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NYC Toll Script & Tokens - TBTA & PANYNJ
 triborough bridge tunnel authority tbta panynj token tokens scrip port new york city new jersey verrazano verrazzano goethals outerbridge bayonne lincoln Holland george washington brooklyn battery throgs neck
bronx whitestone queens midtown henry hudson crossbay cross bay marine parkway gil hodges veterans memorial commutation combination ticket toll tariff fare manhattan staten island roads bridges tariff fares schedules ephemera exonumia collecting collection collector



 www.nyctollscrip.info

TOLL SCRIP & TOKENS

.

FROM THE BRIDGES & TUNNELS IN THE NEW YORK METROPOLITAN AREA
.
BY
PHILIP M. GOLDSTEIN

.

        • Henry Hudson Parkway Authority
          .
        • Marine Parkway Authority
          .
        • New York City Tunnel Authority
          .
        • New York City Parkway Authority
          .
        • Triborough Bridge Authority
          .
        • Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority (TBTA)
          .
        • Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Bridges & Tunnels
  • New York State Bridge and Tunnel Commission /  
       New Jersey Interstate Bridge & Tunnel Commission
    .
  • Port of New York Authority (PNYA)
    .
  • Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ)
  • Miscellaneous Issues
    Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan Bridge, etc.


website updated:

Tuesday - 18 February 2020 - 20:20

website created
27 September 2019


.
Table of Contents
(date under each paragraph link reflects last revision date - red is most recent)
.
Introduction
.
11/27/2019
T
B
T
A
M
T
A
Predecessor Agencies

Triborough Bridge &
Tunnel Authority


MTA Bridges & Tunnels
Scrip / Tickets
Pre-TBTA Individual Agency Issues
"First" Issue
"Second" Issue
"Third" Issue
"Fourth" Issue
"Fifth" Issue
"Sixth" Issue
Tokens
The "Wheel"
The "Big M"
The "List"
The "Residents"


Receipts Internal Documents  & Reference Materials
Historical Toll Fares Current Toll Fares
2/7/202011/22/201912/18/2019
P
N
Y
A
P
A
N
Y
N
J
Port of New York Authority /

Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey
PNYA Scrip / Tickets
1935
1951
1960
1969
1970
Commutation

PANYNJ Scrip / Tickets
"First" Issue
"Second" Issue
"Third" Issue
"Fourth" Issue
"Fifth" Issue / Universal
Commutation

Receipts Historical Toll Fares & Information Current Toll Fares,
Vehicle Class Structure 
2/18/20202/18/20202/10/2020
E
Z
P
a
s
s
M
i
s
c
E-ZPass:
or "the end of collecting toll scrip & tokens
as we know it"
Miscellaneous Issues:
Brooklyn Bridge,
Manhattan Bridge,
Williamsburg Bridge and
Queensboro "Blackwell's Island" Bridge
Special Thanks & Acknowledgments Website Dedicated To
11/25/201912/27/2019
.


All images and content of this website, unless otherwise marked are copyrighted either by the author or their respective owners - © 2019 - Philip M. Goldstein
 The content of this website is not to be reused or reproduced in part or in whole, either in printed or electronic form without the express consent of author.
 Please contact me at: bedt14@aol.com - (936) 396-6103.
.
 It shall be known; that neither this website, the author or any contributors (unless otherwise noted), 
have any affiliation with
any governmental agency or office mentioned herein, including but not limited to:

the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority
the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of New York
the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
the City of New York
the State of New York
or the State of New Jersey

and no such affiliation or representation is suggested or should be implied.




I am willing to pay significantly more than face value to acquire needed examples and issues of scrip, 
including complete, partial books or empty book covers; as well as rolls and packs of tokens to my collection.

How much I will pay depends on several factors:
* whether I have the issue or not (and even if I have issues, I may need extras for trade);
* how many of each example you have;
* the overall condition they are in, and;
* whether they are loose, still attached in either a partial or full book, or if you have book cover only;
* condition of the roll or pack of tokens: intact, partial, and the condition of the wrapper.


Please contact me at  bedt14@aol.com  or by telephone at  (936) 396-6103.




Introduction

   As with most obscure ephemera & exonumia issues, in-depth details regarding the toll scrip and token issues of the New York Metropolitan area were severely lacking.

   While collectors including myself for years have known of and acquired these token & scrip issues; short of club or convention presentations, not much was publicity known nor has documentation has been forthcoming to recording their history to posterity. To this collectors best knowledge and research, this is the first online website regarding these issues, and it was borne out of research.
   

   And while I do collect them, this website strictly covers the bridges and tunnels and will not cover token and script issues for the turnpikes, parkways and thruways. Not yet, anyway.


   For those token issues that are known, I use the widely recognized and respectable Atwood Coffee Catalog for United States & Canadian Transportation Tokens, Seventh Edition (2016), Volume One.
   
   However; the impetus for this website is, as I compiled this information and composed this website, I have encountered token varieties that are not listed. So, I took the liberty to expand upon the Atwood Coffee numbering system with a subletter.

   In regards to modern era New York Metropolitan Area toll fiscal issues, there are two separate and distinct agencies that issued fiscal items for toll use; t
he Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority or "TBTA", which has become the Metropolitan Transportation Authority - Bridges & Tunnels and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey "PANYNJ", which was formerly known as Port of New York Authority. Each of these agencies is covered in their own respective sections on this page.

   Historical era issues pertaining to the East River Bridges from 1883-1911 are in their own section at the bottom of the website.


   In regards to scrip, here is where this website should set the bar for research and reference: while the token issues have been researched and documented throughout the decades, courtesy of the Atwood Coffee catalog and the American Vecturist Association (vecturist: a collector of transportation tokens); toll scrip on the other hand has remained relatively unknown.

   To my knowledge, there are no catalogs, guides or other reference materials. Scrip is sort of like the introverted child, playing by itself in a corner of a room somewhere while its popular sibling, the token; is surrounded by lots of friends and attention. I hope this website corrects that.

   These scrip issues have been seen offered for sale in the fields and categories of:
  • exonumia (numismatic items such as tokens, medals, or scrip, other than coins and paper money), 
  • ephemera (things that exist or are used or enjoyed for only a short time. Items of collectible memorabilia, typically written or printed ones, that were originally expected to have only short-term usefulness or popularity) 
  as well as:
  • obsolete currency,
  • transportation memorabilia, and 
  • automobile memorabilia.
.

.
The Purpose of Scrip and Tokens

   Scrip: "any substitute for legal tender. It is often a form of credit."

   It is pertinent to understand that toll scrip was sold at a discount below the singular one way or round trip fare, and to be purchased in advance. If a toll was 50 cents one way, round trip was obviously 1 dollar. But for someone making the trip 5 days a work week / 20 days a work month, this can get expensive. Depending on the amount of scrip purchased and how long it was valid for, determined the amount of discount the purchaser received.

   So the agencies offered toll scrip at a discount; in that a book of say, thirty 50 cent tickets may have been sold for 35 cents of face value, costing the commuter only $10.50 instead of the regular toll rate of $15.00.

  And, depending on the quantity of scrip purchased and its duration of validity, determined initial cost: 30 scrip for 30 days, 25 scrip for two months, 10 scrip for one year, et al. Usually the "commutation" books of 30 days offered the greatest discount but the shortest time of validity. And to understand the amounts, is why I spent a great deal of time on compiling the historical lists of toll amounts both for the TBTA and the PNYA / PANYNJ. 

   Another factor that must be recognized is the stipulation that the toll collector must detach the scrip from the book each time, not the driver. I do not know for certain how inviolable this rule was, but most scrip book covers mention this and even some of the scrip itself has "DO NOT DETACH" printed on it.


   It also has to be kept in mind that the issuance of the tokens and / or scrip were not to permit or control admittance to the bridges or tunnels; as the subway tokens were used to gain admittance to the subway.

   Tokens and scrip were used to encourage
regular commuters and toll users to prepay their toll and thereby increase their speed in paying the toll at their moment of passage and thereby
reducing congestion and dwell time at the manned toll booths. This reduced dwell time would further be enhanced in later years with the addition of exact change lanes.

   To further encourage the use of the tokens and scrip and in consideration of your allowing the agency to hold your money in advance; token rolls as well as books of scrip, were offered at a discount
to include the toll payment due at that moment of passage.

   In other words and for example; if your rolled up to the toll booth in your car and the cash toll was .50; you could hand the toll clerk a $5 bill, and say "a roll". You would get in return: a roll of 9 tokens, a dollar bill for change, maybe a smile and away you drove.


   And so, in consideration of purchasing that roll of tokens or scrip in advance, and letting that agency hold your money for an indeterminate period of time; your toll fare was discounted 10% to 45 cents. And that passage at the moment of purchase would be discounted as well.

    As result of this research, it is now known the TBTA tokens (the only token issues known) varied in their rate of discount, whereas both the TBTA and PNYA and PANYNJ "good until used" scrip were usually fixed at 10% and commutation scrip was offered at 20% due to expiration dates.

   And for what it is worth, toll scrip is not to be confused with a toll receipt, which was provided to the driver that proof the toll was paid. Toll scrip was used to pay, and toll receipts provided proof you paid, whether you needed the proof for your employer or as an employer to deduct it from your taxes or business expenses.

   If you have any questions, suggestions, additions, contributions or corrections, I more than welcome hearing from you. Especially images of issues not already mentioned here! I am always interested in procuring issues I do not have, so please do not hesitate to contact me either by email at bedt14@aol.com or by telephone at (936) 396-6103.
.

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS


.
Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority / MTA Bridges & Tunnels
.


the Seal of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority
.
   The TBTA is responsible for all borough to borough crossings, that is any bridge or tunnel crossing within the city and state of New York. These crossings include those between:

Brooklyn and Queens:
original name "memorial" name date opened
Marine Parkway Bridge Gil Hodges Bridge July 3, 1937
Cross Bay Bridge Veterans Memorial Bridge June 3, 1939
rebuilt: May 28, 1970
Brooklyn and Manhattan:
Brooklyn Battery Tunnel Hugh L. Carey Tunnel May 25, 1950
Brooklyn and Staten Island:
Verrazano Narrows Bridge upper deck: November 21, 1964
lower deck: June 28, 1969
 Queens and the Bronx:
Triborough Bridge Robert F. Kennedy Bridge July 11, 1936
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge April 29, 1939
Throgs Neck Bridge January 11, 1961
Queens and Manhattan:
Triborough Bridge Robert F. Kennedy Bridge July 11, 1936
Queens Midtown Tunnel November 15, 1940
and finally, between Bronx and Manhattan:
Henry Hudson Parkway Bridge December 12, 1936
(administered by TBA beginning 1941)
.
  Before progressing any further, it should be noted that this website will be using the classic (yet incorrect) spelling of Verrazano, because that is the spelling so used on scrip and token issues.
The correct spelling is with two z's: Verrazzano.

.
Predecessor Agencies

   Originally, the administration for each of the crossings was formed as its own operating entity: Triborough Bridge Authority (1933), the Henry Hudson Parkway Authority (1934), the Marine Parkway Authority (which included the Cross Bay Bridge as well) in 1934, and the New York City Tunnel Authority (Queens Midtown Tunnel) in 1936. Each of these agencies issued its own scrip and passes for express use at their specific crossings and as far as it known, were not reciprocal with other crossings.


   I
t is mentioned in several New York Times articles published prior to the existence of the Triborough Bridge Authority, one article in particular dated January 19, 1938; that Robert Moses campaigned for the creation of a unified parkway administration agency to administer to toll roads within the City of New York; to include the existing Henry Hudson Parkway Authority and the Marine Parkway Authority. Robert Moses was chairman and sole member of those Henry Hudson and Marine Parkway Authorities.

   These two agencies would be
consolidated into the New York City Parkway Authority in 1938; until that agency was eventually merged into the Triborough Bridge Authority in February 1940 (and with that name being retained) with the passage of the "Crews-Nunan" bill. Not so coincidentally, Mr. Moses was also in charge of the Triborough Bridge Authority. At this juncture, the New York City Tunnel Authority (Queens Midtown Tunnel) was not part of this organization and was administered to seperately.

   The Triborough Bridge Authority, upon absorbing the New York City Tunnel Authority in 1946; was renamed the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority
(colloquially called "the TBTA") and remained so until 1994.



.

   Also, while not within the scope of this website; the TBTA administered to several other non-parkway / bridge properties: Jacob Riis Park Parking Field, Brooklyn Battery Garage, East Side Airline Terminal and the New York Coliseum.

   The TBTA name remains in use and still exists; however, in 1994 it became part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Bridges and Tunnels. While it still exists, it conducts business as ("d/b/a") MTA Bridges & Tunnels in keeping with the unified Metropolitan Transportation Authority theme, i.e.: MTA Transit (NYC Subways), MTA LIRR (Long Island Rail Road), MTA MNCR (MetroNorth Commuter Railroad), etc.



TABLE OF CONTENTS. .


Scrip / Tickets
.
    At the time of publishing this website in October 2019; the only paper issues that I had encountered for the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority, were IBM style punch card tickets from the 1963 and an empty booklet cover from about the mid-1980's.
.
   However, it is now known there are earlier and later issues. Mentioned in a New York Times article dated July 16, 1939; are the give-aways of a 50 ticket book to drivers on "landmark" occasions: one millionth auto to cross the bridge, the two millionth, and so on; over particular crossings. In this particular case, the driver of the 4,000,000th car at the Marine Parkway Bridge received a book of 50 toll tickets.

   This same article above also describes the lowering of the toll on the Marine Parkway Bridge from 15 cents to 10 cents upon the opening of the Crossbay Parkway Bridge (which took place June 3, 1939 - just 45 days prior) and the 1,000,000th automobile was expected to cross the bridge the following week!  

   That number doesn't seem impressive by today's standards, and granted a lot of those are round trip crossings by residents of Brooklyn and Queens; but when you consider there were only just over twenty-six million private automobiles registered for the entire United States in 1939, four million autos at only one minor non-interstate crossing in the City of New York does leave one a little impressed.
.
   It is with utmost thanks to Ms. Nellie Hankins, Assistant Archivist for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority - Bridges & Tunnels, that I am proud to share the following with you. I received a reply to my email inquiry and request of 01 October 2019 on 22 October:

"There are TBTA predecessor agency toll tickets in our collection dating back to 1939 (they may have been issued as early as 1936). The early ones were special passes issued for free passage to military vehicles,
vehicles on government business, and employees at Manhattan State Hospital on Randall's Island.


The New York City Tunnel Authority sold toll tickets from the Queens Midtown Tunnel beginning in 1940, and TBTA began selling tickets in 1946. The ones that you sent were the square punchcard variety
that were issued beginning in 1963, although yours are slightly later (c. 1970).


I have attached an image of the tokens with their release dates, as well as order sheets for various denominations of tickets. While there were relatively few types of tokens issued, there were many
types of scrip issued by TBTA and its predecessor agencies. The attached samples and price lists are not exhaustive.


I’m attaching examples of toll tickets to a separate email."


   Without any doubt, Ms. Hankins apparently went all out and spent the last three weeks (or a very good portion of it at least!) searching through the TBTA/MTA archives, because I was sent three emails with more images and pdf's than I know what to do with!

    It should be remembered, that the
Henry Hudson Parkway Authority, Marine Parkway Authority and the Triborough Bridge Authority all operated concurrently. Each crossing in essence was operated as its own authority.

   So, with this new information I can now compile the following list of scrip and token issues and usage dates over the decades.

   Also, the naming of the scrip issues (First, Second, Third, et al) are not official TBTA terminology; but names I have associated with the various designs to more easily identify and categorize the various issues.

Remember, and I cannot stress this strongly enough;
Tickets from earlier issues were redeemable even after a new design issue was released (a new design issue did not render the previous issue void).
Therefore various issues were used concurrently.




Index to Pre-TBTA and TBTA Issues of Scrip & Tokens
.
Individual (Predecessor) Authority Scrip Issues - 1936 to 1946:


"Pre-TBTA" Issues:
Marine Parkway Authority, 

Henry Hudson Parkway Authority,  
New York City Parkway Authority,  
New York City Tunnel Authority  and  
Triborough Bridge Authority
1938 - 1946





Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority Scrip & Token Issues: 1946 - 2012

"First Series" Scrip
(denomination bottom right corner)
1946 to ca. 1950
"Second Series" Scrip
(denomination bottom center)
ca. 1950 to ca. 1963
"Third Series" Scrip
(Univac, Univac / IBM and IBM punch cards)
1963 to ca. 1976
Tokens
(four issues)
June 1976 to 1998
"Fourth Series" Scrip
(large size barcode tickets) 
1976? to June 19, 1986 .

unknown at this time

.
"Fifth Series" Scrip
(small size barcode tickets)
June 19, 1986 to 1994?
"Sixth Series" Scrip
(final issue barcode tickets)
1994? to 2012  








Individual (Predecessor) Authority Scrip Issues - 1936 to 1946:

Henry Hudson Parkway Authority Issues: ca. 1941
Henry Hudson Parkway Authority - ca. 1941 - ?
Toll Permit for Official Business
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
New York City Parkway Authority Issues: 1939 to 1946
Cross Bay Parkway Bridge - Toll Permit for Official Business (book cover) - ca. 1939
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.

New York City Tunnel Authority (Queens Midtown Tunnel) Issues: 1940 to 1946
.
 
Special Ticket for Queens Midtown Tunnel - ca. 1940 to 1946
issued to secretary of the Mayor of New York City (Fiorello H. LaGuardia)
printed by The Jarrett Press.
facsimile signature of Pearson Shortridge, manager
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Triborough Bridge Authority Issues: 1936 to 1946
    
Official Ticket for Bronx Whitestone Bridge only - 1/16/1947
facsimile signature of Paul Loeser, general manager (1934-1943)
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.

"C" Official Ticket for Cross Bay Bridge? City? only
owner: Department of Sanitation?
.

"C" Official Ticket for Cross Bay Bridge? City? only - 1/19/1947
facsimile signature of Paul Loeser, general manager (1934-1943)
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.

Official Ticket - general issue - good for all crossings
owner: Long Island State Parkway Commission

facsimile signature of Paul Loeser, general manager (1934-1943)
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority Scrip & Token Issues: 1946 - 2012
.
.
"First Series" - 1946 to ca. 1950
Garage & Servicing Ticket for Park Department Vehicles
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Class 3 - 35 cent ticket for Motor Truck, 2 axles, 2-5 tons for Triborough Bridge & Bronx Whitestone Bridge
JOHN F. TROMMER, INC. overstamp
John F. Trommer was a brewery in Orange, NJ and only operated under that name from 1946 through 1950.
Prior to that it was known as Orange Brewing, and John F. Trommer of New Jersey.
Following 1950, it was purchased by Leibmann Breweries and eventually became part of Rheingold Breweries.

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
   
Class 1 - 25 cent ticket (Queens Midtown Tunnel added) - 1/11/1952
Department of Sanitation overstamp
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Class 3 - 40 cent ticket (Queens Midtown Tunnel added)
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
"Second Series" - ca. 1950's - 1960's

10 cent ticket - 1/17/1952
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
25 cent ticket - 8/8/1962
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
   
35 cent ticket - 1/30/1952
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
40 cent ticket
"Eat Well Meats"
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
60 cent ticket - 8/8/1962
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.

..

75 cent ticket - stamped 6/30/1962
general issue and with FOR USE BY GEROSA VEHICLES ONLY overstamp
Gerosa was founded 1917, with its origins in the Bronx with trucking and hauling.

It remains a rigging & hoisting firm in New Jersey.
note the backstamp bleed through on left edge above the 'G' in Gerosa - it appears to be the date of 1961

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$1.25 - 8/10/1962
perforated: "U S " (presumably government issue)
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.

.
Special Ticket - 1/18/1962
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
   
Special Ticket for Henry Hudson Bridge - 1952
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Special Ticket for Triborough Bridge - Randall's Island Only - 8/2/1962
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Booklet cover for 20 tickets - $2.00 (.10 cents each) for Minor Crossings - 3/6/1962
Passenger Automobiles at: Henry Hudson, Marine Parkway or Cross Bay Bridges
or
Motor Truck (2 axle) less than 2 tons at: Marine Parkway or Cross Bay Bridges

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Booklet cover for 20 tickets - $20.00 ($1.00 each) for Major Crossings - no date
3 axle Truck, Tractor, Franchise Bus or Passenger Automobile with semi-trailer at Brooklyn Battery Tunnel
or
4 axle Truck, Tractor, Non-Franchise Bus or Passenger Automobile with trailer at: Triborough, Bronx-Whitestone or Throngs Neck Bridges
or Queens Midtown Tunnel


(presumed to be ca. 1952 - 1963 when the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel toll was higher than other crossings upon opening,
and before issue of the Univac style tickets and before the opening of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge.)

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.


"Third Series" The Univac Issues - 1963 to ca. 1976

   
   In 1963, a new style of toll scrip was introduced and circulated: the punch cards.

   Some dedicated searching of the world wide web revealed some information on the the toll ticket machines used by the TBTA; from the "VIP Club", a club of retirees from IBM, Remington Rand, Sperry, Univac, Unisys, and other assorted information technology development firms.

   On page 158 of
"UNIVAC PRODUCTS - ST. PAUL A Handbook of Major Products Designed, Developed, and Manufactured a ST. PAUL 16, MINNESOTA; 1947 to 1959" the following is found:

TOLL TICKET READER AND RECORDER

DESCRIPTION

The Univac Toll Ticket Reader and Recorder provides a detailed record on punched tape of cash and toll ticket transactions at a toll gate.

The Ticket Reader equipment comprises the following units: Classified Push Button Panel, Key Identifier Unit, Ticket Reader Assembly.

The Classification Push Button Panel has keys numbered one through nine for designating classes, with a tenth key for special classifications. This keyboard creates the classification entry into the recorder.

The Ticket Reader Assembly senses information from small punched toll tickets, and transmits this information to the recorder.

The Key Identifier Unit provides means for unlocking the equipment to render it operable, simultaneously entering into it the identifying number of the key used, and retaining the key until the equipment is turned off.

The Toll Punching Recorder was developed initially for use by the Triborough Bridge Authority in New York.
It operates in conjunction with the Classification Push Button Panel and Key Identifier Unit. One Recorder issued for each pair of vehicle lanes.

Portions of the Toll Ticket Reader and Recorder are manufactured by Electronic Signal Co. under license to Remington Rand Univac.

PURPOSE

The equipment was designed primarily as part of a Toll Accounting system and can be used to record classification data on a maximum of 10 different classes of vehicles, and data from toll tickets received in lieu of cash.

In five-hole punched paper tape, the equipment records data from the Ticket Reader Unit and axle counts from a treadle in the roadway. It also records the identification number of the lane and of the collector whose key is inserted in the Identifier Unit. A classification is punched for each vehicle transaction, with an initial record punched when the collector turns the equipment on and a terminal record when he turns it off. These initial and terminal transactions cause a record of the time and the number of axles in each direction as then recorded on the axle counters to be punched in the tape, along with the lane and collector numbers. They also reset the counters. A display of the recorded information on light banks is provided for maintenance purposes.

The Recorder accumulates and displays on electromechanical counters the number of vehicles in each of 10 classes and the number of treadle actuations in each direction. It also displays treadle actuations in each direction which occur when the lane is closed. A printed paper tape record of the information is produced by the equipment, and a punched tape record is made from the counters whenever a lane is closed.
.

.
   Both cards in my collection, the 75¢ and $1.00 denomination; do not reflect a printer, but have Univac and IBM style holes. They carry
a serial number prefix of UD, and both carry a printing code of P25191R: the 75 cent is P25191R.14 and the dollar is P25191R.16.

   Shortly following the internet publication of this website (like, within hours), George S. Cuhaj submitted two examples for inclusion. His two tickets are marked for Univac 25191R.2 (10 cent) and IBM Z38345 (Cross Bay Bridge), so we are now able to conclude the type of machines used for toll collection.

   Note the two different style of punchholes. The Univac style has round punchouts (also known as Hollerith style, after the inventor of punch cards, Herman Hollerith), while the IBM style has rectangular punchouts.
These punch cards allowed automatic tabulation and accounting upon issue and upon redemption.

   There are three distinct types of punch cards known for the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority:
.

   And while commonly thought of as mid-Twentieth Century technology, use of the punched cards
for tabulation dates back as far as 1896.

   I originally thought that the TBTA punch cards may be a circa 1950's issue; h
owever, this was an incorrect presumption on my part. If the information received from Ms. Hankins of the TBTA archives is correct (and we have no reason to suspect it otherwise), the all Univac are the first issued punch cards, first issued in 1963; and the Univac / IBM are from circa 1970. She did not specify when the all IBM card were issued; can we presume afterwards?

   All punch cards are single sided with a beveled bottom right corner and all appear to be uniform in size and thickness: 3 ¼" (width) - 2
13/16" (height) - 0.0075" (thickness). 

.
10 cent ticket - 1963
Univac style

collection of George S. Cuhaj
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
Univac only
Univac
beige card stock, black ink
prefix: UC; black sans-serif
round punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
P-25191R.2
.

.
25 cent ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
blue card stock, black ink
prefix: UK; black sans-serif
round punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
P-R25191R.4
.

.
35 cent ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:


printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
buff card stock, black & orange ink
prefix: UD; black sans-serif
round & rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle,
orange diagonal stripe
P-R25191R.6
.

.
40 cent ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style
 
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
salmon card stock, black ink
prefix: UF; black sans-serif
round & rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
P-R25191R.8
.

.
50 cent ticket - ca. 1970
IBM style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:



printing code:
IBM,
IBM
beige card stock, light green dyed edges; black ink
prefix: UV; black sans-serif
rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
fuchsia overtype: OFFICIAL BUSINESS -
CITY OF NEW YORK
P-R25191R.8
.

.
50 cent ticket - Manhattan State Hospital? - ca. 1970
IBM style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:




printing code:
IBM
Osceola Graphics, Inc
beige card stock; black & green ink
prefix: MA; black sans-serif
round punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
green overprint: RANDALL'S ISLAND ONLY
NO RECEIPT
green vertical stripe on right edge
P-R25191R.10
.

.
60 cent ticket - 1963
Univac style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:
printing code:
Univac only
Univac
peach card stock, black ink
prefix: UB; black sans-serif
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
P25191R.12
.

.
75 cent ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style
 
authors collection
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
light green card stock, black ink
prefix: UD; black sans-serif
round punchholes; note the offset ink transfer on the back.
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
P-25191R.14
.

.
75 cent ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style 
FOR USE ON UNITED PARCEL VEHICLES ONLY MASPETH overstamp
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:


printing code
Univac & IBM
unknown
beige cardstock, black ink
prefix: UF; black sans-serif
round & rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
FOR USE ON UNITED PARCEL VEHICLES ONLY MASPETH overstamp
P-25191R.14
.

.

$1.00 ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style

authors collection
card style
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
beige cardstock, black ink
prefix: UD; black sans-serif
round & rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
P-25191R.16
.

.
$1.00 ticket - 8/30/1979
IBM style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnels archives
card style
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
IBM
IBM
beige cardstock, black ink
prefix: US; black sans-serif
rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle
W51672
.

.
$1.00 ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style

FOR USE ON UNITED PARCEL VEHICLES ONLY MASPETH overstamp
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:



printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
beige card stock, black & orange ink
prefix: UB; black sans-serif
round & rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle,
diagonal orange stripe
FOR USE ON UNITED PARCEL VEHICLES ONLY MASPETH overstamp
P-25191R.18
.

.
$1.50 ticket - ca. 1970
Univac / IBM style

FOR USE BY JOSEPH CORY DELIVERY SERVICE ONLY overstamp
Joseph Cory was a "last mile" delivery service specializing in furniture & appliances. After an item was hauled interstate from one terminal to another terminal, Joseph Cory Delivery would deliver it the "last mile" from that terminal to the customer. Their terminal in the New York City area was originally in Manhattan, then they relocated to Secaucus, NJ.
Cory Co. existed until 2019 at which time it was acquired by J. B. Hunt; interstate trucking.

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:



printing code:
Univac & IBM
unknown
beige card stock, black & red ink
prefix: UB; black sans-serif
round & rectangular punchholes
Good For Passage of Motor Vehicle,
vertical red stripe on right side
overstamp for Joseph Cory Delivery Service
P-25191R.34
.

.

.
Passenger Car or Motorcycle ticket Good for Cross Bay "Veterans Memorial" Bridge - ca. 1970 & 3/28/1979
IBM style
(top) collection of George S. Cuhaj
(bottom) collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:


printing code
IBM only
IBM
peach card stock with dyed ends; black ink
prefix: AA, AB: black sans-serif
large outline "C" on face
FOR PASSENGER CAR OR MOTORCYCLE
GOOD ONLY AT CROSS BAY VETERANS MEMORIAL BRIDGE
IBM Z38345
.

.
Special Ticket - 4/27/1967
Univac style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:
printing code:
Univac only
Univac
light gray card stock; black ink
prefix: UA; black sans-serif
SPECIAL TICKET VALID ON ALL FACILITIES
P-25191R.24
.

.

Special Ticket Valid on All Facilities - ca. 1970
IBM style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting:

printing code:
IBM only
IBM
white card stock; black & gold ink
prefix: U I; small red serif
SPECIAL TICKET VALID ON ALL FACILITIES
gold ink, progressively larger concentric diamonds
IBM E724268
.

.
Special Ticket Valid on All Facilities, Type 2 - 8/7/1979
IBM style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting:

printing code:
IBM only
IBM
light gray card stock; black ink
prefix: UE; black sans-serif
SPECIAL TICKET VALID ON ALL FACILITIES
none
IBM W51676
.

.
Special Ticket for Queens Midtown Tunnel - 11/16/1967
Univac style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:
printing code:
Univac only
Univac
light gray card stock; black ink
prefix: UA; black sans-serif
SPECIAL TICKET FOR ____________
P-25191R.28
.

.
Special Ticket for Triborough Bridge - Manhattan State Hospital Issue? - 1963
Univac style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:

printing code:
Univac only
unknown
light gray card stock; black ink
prefix: UA; black sans-serif
SPECIAL TICKET FOR TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE (outlined T)
FOR RANDALL'S ISLAND ONLY overprint
P-25191R.28
.

.
Garage and Servicing Ticket
For Park Department Vehicles -
111/14/1967
Univac style

collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:



printing code:
Univac only
Univac
light gray card stock; black & blue ink
prefix: UA; black sans-serif;
GARAGE AND SERVICING TICKET OR
PARK DEPARTMENT VEHICLES
FOR RANDALL'S ISLAND ONLY overprint
blue horizontal stripe
P-25191R.31
.

.
Garage and Servicing Ticket
For Park Department Vehicles - 10/15/1981
-
IBM style
T. Vinetti park supervisor overstamp
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:



printing code:
IBM only
IBM
light gray card stock; blue side edges; black ink
prefix: UA; black sans-serif;
GARAGE AND SERVICING TICKET OR
PARK DEPARTMENT VEHICLES
FOR RANDALL'S ISLAND ONLY overprint
blue horizontal stripes on left & right edges
IBM W51679
.

.
   In regards to the following cover for the Cross Bay Bridge / Veterans Memorial Bridge (which is for the ticket above); my internet research has not revealed what year "Veterans Memorial" was added to the name. Knowing this, would definitely give a fair approximation of the issue date. Since the Marine Parkway Bridge is overstamped on the booklet cover, can we conclude this booklet was issued soon after 1937 when the Marine Parkway Bridge was built, until new tickets including the bridge could be printed?

   But, I also took note that this issue has 5 digit zip codes listed for neighborhoods in Rockaway:

11691 - Bayswater
11692 - Arverne
11693 - Rockaway Beach
11694 - Rockaway Park
11695 - Far Rockaway
11697 - Roxbury


   As the US Post Office Department did not institute the 5 digit zip code until July 1, 1963; I think we may have a better approximation of the issue date of these tickets. I also note that they are called "postal zones" and not zip codes. "Postal zone" was the old nomenclature prior to the 5 digit zip code, so by the combination of the old name and the new 5 digit zip code, I would say these were issued very shortly after July 1963. Confirming this issue date is Ms. Hankins reply to my inquiry.

.
.
Book Cover for Passenger Car or Motorcycle ticket
Good for Cross Bay "Veterans Memorial" Bridge
with "ALSO FOR USE AT MARINE PARKWAY BRIDGE" overprint
40 tickets, $10 - Rockaway Resident
(front cover for ticket which may be seen above)

collection of George S. Cuhaj
card style:
printer:
colors:
serial number:
notes:




printing code:
IBM
IBM
peach, black ink - back: none
not on cover

FOR USE AT CROSS BAY VETERANS MEMORIAL BRIDGE ONLY FOR PASSENGER CARS AND MOTORCYCLES OWNED BY PERSONS RESIDING WITHIN POSTAL ZONES #11691
 #11692  #11693  #11694  #11695 and #11697
with added stamp: ALSO FOR USE AT MARINE PARKWAY BRIDGE
IBM Z38346
.




Please note:
The next chronological issue of toll payment to be released following the Univac punch cards is technically the token issues; which entered circulation in 1976.
These tokens are covered in a separate chapter on this website a little further on and following the scrip, and as I wanted to keep all the paper scrip issues together.

.

.
   One of the internal documents that was included in Ms. Hankins' email caught me off guard.

   According to the intra-governmental order dated December 8, 1986 seen at right, you will take note that tokens AND tickets are available at the same time.

   I (erroneously) was under the conclusion the tokens replaced the older Univac scrip, and then the bar code scrip replaced the tokens as the toll tariffs exceeded the highest value token of $1.00, or at least a combination of tokens, i.e.: a 50 cent and $1.00 for a combined value of $1.50.

   But this turns out not to be the case, as this order form clearly lists token and ticket issues available for purchase concurrently.

   This document also conveniently reflects the denominations of scrip tickets available at the end of 1986, as well informs us as to the discount of 10% off the full toll fare, when purchasing books of 20 tickets.

   Another interesting fact in regards to this document; is that while rolls of tokens are not listed on the public order forms as seen in the
Internal Documents & Reference Materials chapter further on in this website, they are listed on the inter-governmental order as seen to the right.

   Tokens were apparently available by special arrangement, in particular for ordering by the government. Note next to Order Number: "Intra Governmental".

   Presumably, either special postal arrangements were made, a courier was used or in dealing with a large quantity of tokens, an armored truck or carrier.

   A quick web search of the address listed for the "U.S. Property & Fiscal Officer, NJ" reveals this address is still valid, and is home to the State of New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs, including Army and Air National Guards.

 
.

.
"Fourth Series" Large Barcode Issues (unseen) - ca. 1976 to June 19, 1986

   According to internal documents of the TBTA (as seen to right) dated 1986, there was a large size (size not noted) barcode issue, that was replaced with a small size barcode issue of 3 3/4" x 2 1/8".

   At this time, no known images exist of this "large barcode" script issue.  

   However, the subsequent issue (which numerically would be the "Fifth" Series) is described and photostatic copies are included in the memo at right..

   Note the design: a double-ended arrow, with the barcode to right comprising the shaft of the arrow.


   Unfortunately, color scans of these issues were not in the MTA Archives, but the colors of each denomination are at least specified in the memo.

   Remember: these are the "Fourth Series" /  smaller size barcode scrip that replaced the large barcode scrip (which again, are unfortunately not even illustrated).

   This memo also mentions the IBM punch card tickets, so we can surmise the following order of issuance (usage overlaps) for TBTA Scrip & Tokens:



Univac / IBM punch cards: 
1963 - 1970

tokens: 
1976 - 1998

large size barcode tickets (none shown) 
1976? to June 19, 1986

small size (fifth series) barcode tickets (b&w copies on bottom of memo to right, hypothetical color tickets next paragraph below): 
June 19, 1986 to ca. 1994

final issue (sixth series) barcode tickets (next chapter): 
1994 to 2012.

.

.
"Fifth Series" Small Barcode Issues - June 19, 1986 to ca. 1994
.
   After reading the above memo outlining the new small barcode issue of scrip; and only having a black & white copy, I was feeling like something was missing. I also was feeling a little creative, so with a little work with Picasa image editor and MS Paint, I have come up with an approximation of what the "Fifth series" small barcode tickets should appear like, based on the colors listed in the above memo:



  According to a study performed by the firm URS for the TBTA: "HISTORY AND PROJECTION OF TRAFFIC, TOLL REVENUES AND EXPENSES and REVIEW OF PHYSICAL CONDITIONS Of the Facilities of TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE AND TUNNEL AUTHORITY - April 29, 2005"; it states on page 14:

"Over the years, various discount programs have been introduced. In March 1987, the Staten Island Carpool Program was initiated. Staten Island residents were offered 30-round trip coupons for vehicles with three or more occupants at a discounted price of $30.00. This program was revised to 24 coupons for $30.00 in July 1989, to 24 coupons for $42.00 in May 2003, and to 24 coupons for $54.00 in March 2005."

   With this information, the first two dates (March 1987 and July 1989) fall into the usage era of the Fifth Series. While the VNB Carpool tickets mentioned for this issue has not yet been seen, it can be presumed to be similar to the approximate design:




.

.


"Sixth Series" (and final?) Issues - ca. 1994 to 9/30/2017
   
   I had been hoping that at some point, an issue of TBTA scrip would appear that would correspond to the empty booklet cover I have in my collection. The ticket stubs in my booklet have backs
of light green security printing consisting of a repeating TBTA seal. Under the glued black binding of front and rear covers, is 06-2109B-560 (A), and on the front of each of the 24 remaining stubs is 06-1X09-B570 and VN-CAR.

   I had therefore concluded this was a commutation booklet for passenger cars for Verrazano Narrows Bridge. But what did the tickets look like???

   As I processed the images contained within the emails from Ms. Hankins to use here, and as I saw this issue was orange color for most of the scrip, I was growing worried I may never find the answer to my quest. That was until I saw the V. N. Carpool ticket. Green! So, I can now confirm visually what tickets went into my booklet: VN-CAR = VN Carpool.
(And it is refreshing to know I was correct - for once! ))

   Visual examination of the tickets in this series, reflect all denominational issues are orange, with the TBTA seal security underprint. In the center of each note, is an unprinted white rectangle which contains the serial number in barcode format. It is presumed the barcode is UV reflective, but this is not confirmed. I also noticed, that the denomination of each note is now carried in two locations on the face: on the bottom approximately left of center, and on the right edge of the note oriented vertically.

   As previously stated, the Verrazano Narrows Carpool ticket is green, the Special ticket is slate gray and the Garage & Servicing Randall's Island ticket is lilac / lavender. But the interesting issue for this series is undoubtedly the New York Militia ticket. It is printed in a desert camouflage style and without the repeating TBTA seal. In research for this website, I located an image of half of a ticket that appeared on the cover of a New York Naval Militia newsletter. I made a request to the New York Naval Militia for a scan of the whole ticket was denied (despite their being no longer in use or valid for redemption). So again, with a little time and effort in MS Paint, I recreated a close approximation of its appearance.


$3.50
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$7.00
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$10.00
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$11.00
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$13.00
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$19.00 w/ booklet cover
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$26.00 w/ booklet cover
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
$33.00
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
Verrazano Narrows Bridge Carpool Ticket - 2/19/2004?
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives

Verrazano Narrows Bridge Carpool Ticket Book Cover
authors collection

  According to a study performed by the firm URS for the TBTA: "HISTORY AND PROJECTION OF TRAFFIC, TOLL REVENUES AND EXPENSES and REVIEW OF PHYSICAL CONDITIONS Of the Facilities of TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE AND TUNNEL AUTHORITY - April 29, 2005"; it states on page 14:

"Over the years, various discount programs have been introduced. In March 1987, the Staten Island Carpool Program was initiated. Staten Island residents were offered 30-round trip coupons for vehicles with three or more occupants at a discounted price of $30.00. This program was revised to 24 coupons for $30.00 in July 1989, to 24 coupons for $42.00 in May 2003, and to 24 coupons for $54.00 in March 2005."

   With this information, the first two (March 1987 and July 1989) VNB carpool tickets mentioned for this issue has not yet been seen but presumed to be similar to the Fifth Series design in the preceding chapter.
The second two tickets for May 2003 and March 2005; are represented by the Sixth Series issue immediately above.
.

.

Special Ticket - 11/26/2003?
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives
.

.
New York State Militia Special Ticket
authors rendering from a partial ticket seen in a NY Naval Militia newsletter
.

.
Garage and Servicing Ticket for Park Department Vehicles for Randall's Island Only - 6/26/2009
collection of MTA Bridges & Tunnel Archives



   As far as it is known, this was the last series of scrip tickets to be printed and issued by the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority; presumably as a result of the expanding success of E-ZPass RFID units.
.
   Beginning on November 20, 2016; "Cashless Tolling" also known as "Tolls By Mail" would be phased in, in increments:

Henry Hudson Bridge November 20, 2016
Brooklyn Battery / Hugh L. Carey Tunnel January 4, 2017
Queens Midtown Tunnel January 10, 2017
Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge April 30, 2017
Cross Bay Veterans Bridges April 30, 2017
Verrazano-Narrows Bridge July 8, 2017
Triborough / Robert F. Kennedy Bridge June 15, 2017
Throgs Neck Bridge September 30, 2017
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge September 30, 2017

   With the final crossing being converted September 30, 2017, there are no more toll collectors to issue change or take scrip; and TBTA / MTA Bridges & Tunnels are now strictly an electronic tolling and billing system.
.

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS



Tokens:
June 29, 1976 - February 3, 1998 (Major & Minor Crossings)
Rockaway and Staten Island Resident Tokens remained for sale only to the respective residents until 2015
and redemption ended April 30 (Rockaway) and September 30, 2017 (Staten Island)
.

.
   The TBTA Tokens are the most common issues out of all of the toll memorabilia. At any given time, you can find several, if not dozens; of individual examples for sale on eBay.   

   As it is stated in the Hearings before the Subcommittee on Surface Transportation of the Committee on Public Works and Transportation; House of Representatives - Ninety-Fifth Congress; (September - October 1977)

"In June, 1976, TBTA introduced exact-toll tokens in an effort to reduce congestion at its seven bridges and tunnels within New York City.
Less than one year later, the TBTA had collected its ten millionth exact-toll token.
.


 
 So, with that little blurb; we now know when the "Wheel" tokens first entered service and circulation. But the planning for the use of the tokens actually goes back as far as at a board meeting taking place in May, 1973. Samples of tokens were handed out at a subsequent board meeting in January, 1976, when they (the board) approved the original commutation rate, which was just free passage with the purchase of 20 tokens. 


   With a little more digging; I happened across this rather lengthy article in the New York Times; which contains quite a bit of information regarding the earliest of token issues: the 50, 75 and 100 and the Toll Collectors strike that occurred shortly after their release:


.

.
   Takeaways from this article reveal the following:

  • "The tokens being sold in bulk, in plastic bags for $20 each, ..."
This helps solve an ambiguity later in token history regarding reference to packaging of tokens.

It is assumed the reporter is referring to the $1.00 tokens (twenty x $1.00 = $20.00). There would be no advantage for the motorist in paying more than face value for twenty 75 cent (worth $15.00) and twenty 50 cent tokens (worth $10.00).

The only discount per se, for purchasing the 20 packs of tokens was a free token 
at the time of purchase of the pack of 20 of either of the denominations.

.
  • "... the authority had 500,000 tokens, minted six months ago by a New England Company."
Six months ago from June 1976 would be December 1975. This would correspond with the 1975 date in the Atwood Coffee catalog for these tokens, which in actuality is now understood as an order date, not an issue date.

It now remains to be learned whether it was 500,000 for all three varieties (166,666 each denomination) or 500,000 of each denomination. Somehow, 166,666 tokens does not seem like to be enough to cover all the crossings in New York City at once. 166,666 tokens = 8,333 packs of 20 token plus loose?
But, as Ms. Hankins points out: "the market share initially was very low, because keep in mind that cash and tickets were still being accepted. By July, 1977 token use was only at 8%."

.
  • "The new tokens, in different demonstrations [sic] for different facilities, ..."
1.00 (white metal) = Verrazano Narrows Bridge
.75   (copper) =           Triborough, Bronx Whitestone and Throgs Neck Bridges and the Brooklyn Battery and Queens Midtown Tunnels
.50   (brass) =              Cross Bay, Marine Parkway & Henry Hudson Bridges

.
  • "... minted six months ago by a New England Company." 
While it remains unknown for certain, Roger Williams Mint was located in Massachusetts and Rhode Island; and Scovill Manufacturing was in Waterbury, Connecticut. Both of these were located in New England, along with other manufacturers. Hopefully in the near future we will be able to determine exactly which manufacturer produced these issues..
.

.
Rolls and Packs:
.
   It has to be kept in mind, that the intent of the tokens were not to permit or control admittance to the bridges or tunnels, as the subway tokens were used to gain admittance to the subway. The TBTA tokens were used to encourage prepayment and speed in paying the toll for regular commuters and toll users by using the exact change lanes, and thereby reducing congestion and dwell time at the manned toll booths.

   To further encourage the use of the tokens (and in allowing the agency to hold your money in advance); token rolls (as well as books of scrip) were offered at a discount,
to include the toll payment due at that moment of passage. In other words, if your rolled up to the toll booth in your car and the cash toll was 50 cents; you could hand the toll clerk a $10 bill, and say "a roll". You would get in return: a roll of 20 tokens, a dollar bill for change, maybe a smile and away you drove.

   And so, in consideration of purchasing that roll of tokens in advance, your toll fare was discounted 10% to 45 cents. And that passage at the moment of purchase would be discounted as well.


   It should be known that the discounted price of token rolls varied over time due to several factors. The base discount for the regular driver was 10% (understood to later be raised to 20%):

  • the full passenger automobile price of the toll at that time,
  • the quantity of tokens in the roll, 
  • the "freebie" (a free token or that trip included)
  • whether resident status accorded you an additional discount (Rockaway or Staten Island Residents), and
  • and naturally, the agreed upon rate of discount as set forth by the administration tariff sheet.

   As a result of these variables, my calculations reflect that over the years the discount varied between 5% up to 44% for the Resident issues.

   Also, it should be noted that the tokens were only available to Class 1 vehicles (2 axle passenger automobiles with no trailers). All other vehicle classes regularly transiting through the tolls were encouraged to use the scrip.

   As research into this subject continues, more and more roll and pack quantities come to light; and to date, we are now aware of rolls of 8, 9, 10, 11, 19 and 20 and packs of 5, 10 and 20; but keep in mind, not all rolls or packs existed at the same time.

    When token packaging first began, in June 1976; the .50, .75 and 1.00 "Wheel" tokens were packaged in plastic bags containing 20 tokens. The only "discount" was a free token given with each package. As a result, the discount was minimal: around 5%.

   I have not found any images of rolls or packs of the "Wheel" style tokens as yet.

   The earliest rolls I now have in my collection, are the brass "Big M" NY630BA M 100 tokens. I was fortunate enough to acquire two different rolls at the same time, each unique on their own. One is red printing and has images of the tokens adorning the wrapper. The other, containing the same tokens, is printed in blue and without the token images.

   At this time, I am unsure of which wrapper was issued first. I would hazard the the more ornate red wrapper was issued first; then simplified. As the NY630BA tokens were issued August 23, 1980; we at least know the earliest date these rolls would have been issued. The question remains, does the blue wrapper denote a change in value and was issued when the cost of the tokens as raised to $1.25? In any case, it is currently thought (by me) the latest these rolls would have been issued is presumably 4/18/1982 when the NY630BD copper plated "List" tokens were released

.....
NY630BA (roll) - "TBTA 20 TOKENS"
Issued August 23, 1980 through April 18, 1982?
(Red wrapper with token images)
Images are approximately actual size.
authors collection
NY630BA (roll) - "TBTA 20 TOKENS"
Issued August 23, 1980? through April 18, 1982?
(Blue wrapper without token images)
Images are approximately actual size.
authors collection

.

.
   Commencing with the next issue of token, NY630BD copper plated "List"; we now see roll quantities of 9 and 19.

   The roll of 9 or 19 may seem like an odd quantity to roll coinage or tokens. Well, there was a reason for this: most daily commuters bought a roll of tokens on payday or on the first day of a work week, and most of those drivers made two one-way trips per day: one to work, another to come home; for the five business days per work week. That equals 10 trips through the toll booth per week or 20 trips per two week period. But, you also had to charge for the trip through the toll booth you were on
at that moment to buy those tokens. If the rolls were 10 and 20, that would equals 11 or 21 tokens, and that would mean coinage into the mix.

   So the rolls of 9 and 19 "and this trip" made things nice and simple for the commuter.


NY630BD (roll) - Major Crossings, "ROLL OF 19 TOKENS $34.00 INCLUDES THIS TRIP"
Issued commensurate with February 7, 1987 toll schedule until July 16, 1989.
Images are approximately actual size.
.

.

   However, the discovery of the roll of 8 leaves us really stymied. To what purpose would 8 serve? One per day, an extra plus "and this trip"? Was it to keep the purchase price of the roll to the nearest nickel or dime? I just don't know at this time and neither does Ms. Hankins.


   Until finding that roll of 8; I had personally only encountered rolls of "9 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP". I would learn; by reviewing one of the order forms of the TBTA for December 1986, it is reflected that one could order rolls of 60 cent tokens for $11.40, and 1.30 tokens for 24.70 each. This equates to rolls of 19 tokens per roll, but this is an inter-governmental order and I didn't think much more about it.

   The packs of of 5 and 10 make sense for the Verrazano Narrows Bridge / Staten Island Resident. Tolls are only collected one way: westbound from Brooklyn. So they would only require 5 tokens per work week or 10 for every two work weeks.

   
Ms. Hankins, the TBTA archivist; has not located any rolls or wrappers saved for posterity in their archives as yet, nor did she have knowledge other than the rolls of 19 (to which I immediately knew was not complete accounting). With my procurement of this roll of 8, she is now adding this data to the archives to reflect its existence and research is ongoing. The packs of 20 are mentioned in a New York Times article.

   Another purchasing variable concerning token sales that has come to light, is in the way of an letter dated January 13, 1992 from
Michael C. Ascher; President, Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority in reply to a letter to the editor, published December 20, 1991 in the New York Times:

"To the Editor:
Customers at New York City's Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority facilities are not limited to purchasing a single roll of nine discounted tokens as Josh Stern writes (letter, Dec. 20).

At any of our facilities, you may buy for $42 two nine-pack rolls of tokens, one loose token and the toll passage you are making.
We began selling tokens in smaller rolls when a survey showed more customers would use them."

.

.
   From this at least, we also now see a multi-roll / loose token combination arrangement: two rolls of 9 (= 18), and one loose token (= 19) (to make up for the second "and this trip" not being taken at that moment, and the trip one is making at that moment, which comes to twenty tokens.


   My calculations? The value of the tokens: $2.10 each; commensurate with the published discounted token roll purchase.

   In yet another article from the New York Times, dated July 16, 1989; it mentions

"Some delays were reported yesterday at the Queens-Midtown Tunnel when more eastbound motorists than usual lined up to buy a roll of nine tokens for $17. The price of a roll rose to $21 today. Drivers were permitted to buy only one roll of tokens. They are good on the three major bridges and two tunnels, where the toll is now $2.50.""
.

.
   So again, while I knew of the "rolls of 9"; and when this "roll of 8" appeared on eBay, I knew I had to bring it home. If my calculations are correct, this $21.00 roll is dated from the institution of July 16, 1989 toll schedule; whereas full toll rate was $2.50; and discount token (with purchase of a roll) was $2.10: ($21.00 ÷ 9 = $2.33 x 10% discount = $2.10). That would mean actual purchase price of the roll would be $18.90: (9 x $2.10 = $18.90)
.


NY630BD (roll) - Major Crossings, "ROLL OF 8 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP" $21.00
Issued commensurate with July 16, 1989 toll schedule until January 31, 1993.
Images are approximately actual size.
authors collection
.

.
   But even as something as simple as that letter to the editor above and its reply raised questions: the letter to the editor was written in December 1991 and the reply January 1992. It mentions "nine-pack rolls of tokens". So where does the roll of "8 tokens and this trip" factor in, as it too was issued during this time period: 1989-1993!?

   And, we now know they were issued as other roll values as well. The following roll, unfortunately with the wrapper split (but still worthy of a loving home!) is seen in the $25.00 roll value. This would have it fall in the January 31, 1993 through March 24, 1996 fare schedule.


NY630BD (roll) - Major Crossings, "ROLL OF 8 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP" $25.00
Issued commensurate from January 31, 1993 through March 24, 1996
Images are approximately actual size.
authors collection
..

.


   At least we can takeaway that the "smaller rolls" came about in response to motorist requests for smaller rolls.

   Another minor observation made from the comparison of the "Roll of 8" and the "Roll of 9": the rolls are of the same length (wrappers are of the same width), but the crimp on one end of "Roll of the 8" is deeper than on the "Roll of 9"; thereby taking up the space of the 9th token.


.

.
   Like the "8 roll" we now know of a "roll of 11". This next roll, seen below; is believed to be the Minor Crossings roll counterpart to the Major Crossings roll above. The images were located on the web, as part of a completed auction value aggregating service from a listing some time ago.


   But again, here we have a roll with a weird quantity amount: "11 tokens and this trip", for a total of twelve trips. This quantity also does not configure to the 5 and 10 trip per commuter week. And again we find ourselves asking: why?

NY630BC (roll) - Minor Crossings, "ROLL OF 11 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP" $10.00
Issued commensurate with July 16, 1989 toll schedule until January 31, 1993.
Images are approximately actual size.
.

.

   The next Major Crossings roll issued chronologically is this example. Again, NY630BD remains the issued token. The wrapper is unbleached kraft paper with light blue ink. Notably, the numeral 9 is underlined (to differentiate it from an upside down 6):   9 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP    $21.00




v
NY630BD (roll) - Major Crossings, "ROLL OF 9 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP" $21.00
Issued commensurate with January 1, 1993 toll schedule until March 23, 1996.
Images are approximately actual size.
authors collection


.
   As I stated previously, I had known of the existence of the roll of "9 tokens and this trip", but did not have one in my collection. This roll below needed a home too; so I purchased it as well. If my calculations are correct, this $30.00 roll is dated from the institution of March 24, 1996 toll schedule; whereas full toll rate was $3.50; and the discount token (with purchase of a roll) was $3.00: $30.00 ÷ 10 = $3.00 x 10% discount = $2.70. That would mean actual purchase price of the roll would be $27.00: 10 x $2.70 = $27.00.

   Wait. $2.70 per token??? That does not make sense as tokens were not discounted to $2.70. They were either discounted to $2.50 (from the $3.00 full rate in 1993 to 1996) or $3.00 (from the $3.50 full rate in 1996 to 1998). And it definitely would not be from full fare $3.50 to discounted $2.50, as that would entail a 28.57% discount, substantially more than the prepaid books of 20% discounted toll scrip!

   So, it led me to start recalculating. Why the difference in discount amount? It is known that the discount for ticket books increased from 10% to 20% circa 1985. While unconfirmed, it stands to reason the discount for a token roll purchase increased as well.

   And, we also know the price of the discount for a token roll varied depending on whether a regular token, a Staten Island resident or a Rockaway resident. So it is therefore concluded at this time the discounts for rolls varied (including fractions of a percent) depending on time frame and use.

   As I computed I noticed the discount varies based on the prices. If a straight 10% discount existed throughout all toll rates over history would require loose change. While $1.00 discounted 10% = 90 cents, a roll of 10 therefore would cost $9.00. Easy enough, a dollar change for a $10 dollar bill. But remember! There were 50 cent tokens, 75 cent tokens as well as $1.00 tokens.

   And as the tolls went up, to $1.25, then $1.50, and so on, the rate of discount was adjusted to keep the token value close enough to the nearest quarter, i.e.: $3.50 cash toll discounted 10% = $3.15. 3.15 x 10 = $31.50. Change would at least have to include two quarters and three one dollar bills, and possibly a five dollar bill if a motorist was handing over two twenties.

   So, there was need for the discount percentage to be adjusted, otherwise multiple coinage and bill denominations would come into play in both paying and handling change.


   My calculations reflect that for this roll (of 9 and this trip) and amount ($30), the corresponding discount would either be 16.67% to reduce the amount from full fare $3.00 per trip to the discounted $2.50 (1993 to 1996); or 14.29% to get it from full fare $3.50 per trip to discounted $3.00 (1996 to 1998). So at a 14.29% discount, the roll of tokens cost an even $30.00

   Therefore, I believe this roll / wrapper / value combination
to be the last roll style issued for sale and should have seen use until February 3, 1998; when token sales for the Major Crossings were officially discontinued. (Resident tokens remained for sale.)

   The tokens themselves would remain redeemable until September 30, 2017.


NY630BD (roll) - Major Crossings, "ROLL OF 9 TOKENS AND THIS TRIP" $30.00 (shown approximately actual size)
Issued commensurate with March 24, 1996 toll schedule through May 18, 1998 (when token sales ceased)
Images are approximately actual size.
authors collection
.

.
   The following is a comparison chart of cash (full fare) tolls, regular discount tokens, and tokens for Staten Island or Rockaway Residents amounts.

Major Crossings...Minor Crossings
date
cash (full toll fare)
(Major / VNB)
tokendiscount %
token for
Staten Island resident
S I Resident
discount %
cash (full toll fare)
tokendiscount %
token
Rockaway Resident
Rockaway
Resident discount
%
June 29, 1976 1.75.715.3 %n/an/a.50.4216 %n/an/a
March 1, 1976 (VN)
June 29, 1976
1.00.955.0 %n/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
May 19, 19801.00??n/an/a
June 2, 1980
 June 16, 1980
.60 (HH)
.75 (CB & MP)
.50?n/a
April 19, 1982
1.251.1012.0 %n/an/a.90.6033 %n/an/a
June 23, 1983 21.25  ~  ~1.0020 %
January 3, 19841.501.30 13.3%1.20 20 %.90.6033 %n/an/a
January 1, 19861.751.5014.3%1.4020 %1.00.66633 %n/an/a
February 7, 19872.001.7014.9%1.6020 % 1.00.66633 %n/an/a
March 15, 1987 32.00  /  4.00 1.7014.9 %1.2520 %n/cn/cn/cn/an/a
July 16, 19892.50  /  5.002.1016 %4.2016 %1.25.83333 %n/an/a
January 31, 19933.50  /  6.002.5028.5 %4.0033 %1.50.83344 %n/an/a
March 24, 1996 43.50  /  7.003.00 14.2 %6.00 14.3 %1.751.2529 %1.0043 %
May 18, 20034.00  /  8.00n/an/a5.60 30 %2.001.3333 %1.1642 %
March 15, 20054.50  /  9.00n/an/a6.4028.9 %2.251.3340.5 %1.3341 %
March 16, 20085.00  /  10.00n/an/a6.7033 %2.501.6733 %1.4044 %
=  Regular discount token sales began June 29, 1976.
=  Staten Island Resident Discount effective on or shortly after this date.
3  =  tolls doubled at Verrazano Narrows Bridge and collected westbound only on and after this date.
4 =  Regular discount token sales ended February 3, 1998. However, token sales for Staten Island & Rockaway Resident appear to have continued until 2015.
      Token redemption ended 
April 30, 2017 Rockaway Residents (Cross Bay & Marine Parkway Bridges) and for Staten Island Residents on September 30, 2017 (Verrazano Narrows Bridge).
      n/a = not applicable,
      n/c = no change

.

.

   This next chart is a compilation of known token rolls and packs and IS NOT complete. Some information may change as new data arrives. For the most part, the data contained is either empirical from examples in my collection ( ), images on the web ( ), from toll receipts ( Θ ) or mentioned in newspaper articles ( ).

.
packaging (roll or pack) & quantity - offer 
Major or Minor
Crossing

token description 
A/C #

(notes / remarks)
discounted purchase amount marked on the roll
[full cash fare in brackets] (value of token in parenthesis and includes the free trip or free token)
date(s) of use.
6/1976 
5/18/1980
6/1976 
5/18/1980
5/19/1980 
4/18/1982
4/19/1982 
1/2/1984
4/19/1982 
1/2/1984
1/3/1984 
12/31/1985
1/1/1986 
7/15/1989
7/16/1989 
1/30/1993
1/31/1993
 3/23/1996
3/24/1996 to
2/3/1998 *
.
Rolls
Roll of 8
and this trip

Major Crossings
copper "List" 
NY630BD
$21  
[2.50] (2.10)
7/16/1989 to 1/30/1993
$25
[3.50] (2.50)
1/31/1993 to 3/24/1996

Roll of 9
and this trip

Major Crossings
copper "List" 
NY630BD
$17
[2.00] (1.70)
2/7/1987 -
7/15/1989
$21
[3.50] (2.50)
1/31/1993 - 3/24/1996
$30  
[3.50] (3.00)
3/24/1996 - 2/3/1998

Roll of 10
and this trip

Major Crossings
copper "List" 
NY630BD
.




.
$21
[2.50] (2.10)
7/16/1989 -
1/30/1993

Roll of 11
and this trip

Minor Crossings

copper "List" 
NY630BC


$10
[1.25] (.833)
7/16/1989 - 1/30/1993
$11 
[1.50] (.833)
12/24/1995

Roll of 19

Major Crossings

(inter-governmental)

.



.
$24.70
[1.75] (1.30)
1986

Roll of 19

Minor Crossings

(inter-governmental)

.



.
$11.40
[1.00] (.60)
1986

Roll of 19 includes this trip

Major Crossings
copper "List" 
NY630BD

$34  Θ
[2.50] (1.70)
2/7/1987 to 7/15/1989

Roll of 19 includes this trip

Major Crossings
w/ Staten Island Discount

copper "List"
NY630BD
.



.
$32  Θ
[2.50] (1.60)
2/7/1987 to 7/15/1989

Roll of 20 includes this trip

Minor Crossings
copper "List" 
NY630BC

.



.
$14  Θ
[1.00] (.666)
2/7/1987 to 7/15/1989

Roll of 20 including 1 free trip

Major Crossings
copper "List" 
NY630BD

.



.
$22
[1.25] (1.10)
from 4/19/1982 to ?

Roll of 20 and free token
brass 'M100' 
NY630BA
red wrapper
(the significance of the red vs. blue
wrapper seen below is not yet known)

$20
[1.00] (.952)
8/23/1980 - 4/18/1982

Roll of 20 and free token
brass 'M100' 
 NY630BA

blue wrapper
(the significance of the blue vs. red wrapper
seen above is not yet known)

$20
[1.00] (.952)
8/23/1980 - 4/18/1982

Roll of 21 and free token

Major Crossings
brass 'M100' 
NY630BA
.



.
$22
[1.00] (.95)
? to 4/19/1982
(replaced with above 20 copper "List" token above)

.
Packs
Pack of 5 - Staten Island Residents Only
brass "Resident" - NY632D
(unknown if "4 and this trip" or 5 actual tokens)


1998 to 9/30/2017

Pack of 10 - Staten Island Residents Only
brass "Resident" - NY632D
(unknown if "9 and this trip" or 10 actual tokens)


1998 to 9/30/2017

Pack of ? - Rockaway Residents Only
brass "Resident" - NY631Y

1998 to 4/30/2017

Pack of 20 - .50 + 1 free w/ purchase
brass plated "Wheel" - NY630AU
$10  Θ
[.50] (.42)
starting 6/1976

Pack of 20 - .75 + 1 free w/ purchase
copper plated "Wheel" - NY630AV
$15  Θ
[.75] (.71)
starting 6/1976

Pack of 20 - 1.00 + 1 free w/ purchase
(white metal plated "Wheel" - NY630AW
$20  Θ
[1.00] (.95)
starting 6/1976

Pack of 20
Major Crossings
$22
[1.10]
4/21/1982
$30
[1.75] (1.40)
1/1/1986- 2/6/1987
$34
[2.00] (1.60)
2/7/1987 - 7/16/1989

Footnotes:
Mail orders of tokens ended 5/14/1982
Major Crossing Token sales ended 2/3/1998
Rockaway and Staten Island Resident Tokens remained for sale only to the respective residents until 4/30 and 9/30/2017
All token redemption ended 9/30/2017
= in authors collection
 = visually confirmed to exist
Θ = listed on toll receipts
₦ = mentioned in newspaper
.

.
Mail Order
.
   Other than purchasing them at the toll booths, token rolls were also available by mail.
To be mailed; the token rolls, due to weight and non-machinability in postal sorting machines; a roll would have either have to have been sent first class mail with a non-machinable surcharge added to the base postage; or parcel post, which is processed at a much slower rate due to irregular sizes & weights than first class.

   No mention is made of additional shipping charges for the token rolls by mail; so we conclude the TBTA absorbed those postage costs and incurred a reduced margin of revenue. Ms. Hankins suggested the "and this trip" was not redeemed through a mail order, so this offset the postage costs incurred by the TBTA.

   
It is mentioned in at least one New York Times article dated April 20, 1982 that:

"Tokens for any of the bridges or tunnels can be purchased at tollbooths or at the authorities administration building on Randall's Island. No credit cards or checks will be accepted. Tokens can also be purchased by mail by sending a check or money order to the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority, Randall's Island, New York, NY 10035."

"A packet  of 20 tokens costs $22.00" reducing the trip cost of each trip to $1.10."
.
   As the time this was published (the day after the toll fare raise of April 19), the full fare for a passenger automobile (with no trailer) was $1.25. $1.25 reduced to $1.10 works out to a 12% discount.

   The use of the word "packet" raised a potential question as well. A packet infers a small enclosed envelope: (the NYCTA offered ten tokens in a clear plastic bag approximately 2 1/2" x 2 1/2" and called a "TimeSaver Pak". But a roll is significantly different from a packet. When someone asks for a packet of coins from a bank, we will be met with a blank stare. Ask for a roll and there are no questions.

   The use of a packet, being flatter and more flexible; would allow it to be processed via automated sorting machines and therefore shipped expeditiously via first class.

  
With the discovery of the June 1976 New York Times article seen at the beginning of this chapter, we now have confirmation of the use of plastic bags for packaging 20 tokens. If anyone out there has an actual token pack (as opposed to a roll) for the TBTA tokens, send an image and we could put this matter to rest.

   While the TBTA order forms for the public as seen in the Internal Documents & Reference Materials chapter later in this website clearly show scrip ticket books available by mail, these forms do not list tokens (with the exception of the inter-governmental order).

   But, we have confirmation via Ms. Hankins that the TBTA did in fact offer tokens by mail. Because such practice was discontinued in 1982! Included in the minutes of a meeting taking place of May 14, 1982 (not 4 weeks after the New York Time article above), the following is recorded:


.

.
Individual Full Fare Token Sales:
.
   If my memory serves me correctly, I also distinctly recall toll collectors selling "the List" tokens individually for full price.

   If your journey was to be round trip and the toll rate was $3.50 at the crossing at that time, you could pull up to the manned full service / receipts toll booth, hand the toll collector $7.00 and request a token as change for the return trip.

   This way; on your return trip you could save a little time, by avoiding the manned toll lanes and use the exact change lanes. With token in hand, you approached the collection basket at a slow roll in your car, rolled down your window and flung your token into the basket without actually stopping and gunned the accelerator.

.

.
Overall Design Characteristics of the Token Issues:
.
   There are four major styles of TBTA token issues: "the Wheel", "the Big M", "the List" and "the Resident". These are informal names that I have assigned to them to identify and discuss them easier.

   The "Wheel" design is the first issue, and released in June 29, 1976. They are seen in three denominations: 50 (brass plated), 75 (copper plated) and 100
(white metal plated) with several subtypes of the 75 cent token being known: thin border rim, thick border rim, small letter, large letter and a solid brass. Some of these variants may not be intentional design changes (with the exception of the solid brass issue), but a result of contracting with different manufacturers over time.

   They all carry the splayed leg '
M' logo of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. As this logo was adopted for use in 1968, the tokens were logically issued after this date. While the Atwood Coffee catalog attributes the earliest issue date as 1975, the newspaper article and internal information from the TBTA confirms June 29, 1976 as the first time the tokens were released for circulation to the public. Therefore, the date listed in the Atwood Coffee may be the manufacturing date. The manufacturer is unknown at this time.    

   There are several common factors among all four series of TBTA tokens:
 
 
1) all TBTA tokens are medallion orientation;  
   The lettering on all tokens of all four issues is of medallion orientation, that being if your hold the token with your fingers at the 12 and 6 o' clock positions (vertical axis), and turn the token; the writing on both sides remains readable. A coin orientation means if you hold the token (or coin) with your fingers at the 9 and 3 o'clock positions (horizontal axis), and turn the coin or token over, both sides remains readable; (but when flipped at 12 and 6 o'clock, one side is upside down).  

2) all known tokens EXCEPT the NY632D (Staten Island Resident), have a reeded edge (that is, grooved like a US dime or quarter, not smooth like a penny or nickel);
      whereas the NY632D (Staten Island Resident) has a smooth rolled edge;  

3) all known tokens have a solid design, that is with no cut outs or punch outs in the design (like the first designs of the NYC Subway tokens with Y cut out);

4) all tokens are lightly magnetic EXCEPT NYC630BK ( M / 75 / TBTA ) and NY630BAa ( M / 100 ).
.
   Tokens illustrated below are shown larger than actual size (unless otherwise noted) for detail but are scaled the same for size comparison.

   Token types known are thus:

First Issue - "the Wheel"
issued 1976 - 1982 (?)

   Both sides (obverse and reverse) of the tokens have same relief (raised) design: M / 50 / TBTA or  M / 75 / TBTA or  M / 100 / TBTA.


Atwood Coffee
number
obverse printing reverse printing issue
date
size (diameter)
weight (g) 1
material edge notes obverse reverse
NY630AU M 
50
TBTA
 M 
50
TBTA
June 1976 25mm

6.2 g
brass plated 
red brass? 
reeded thin border rim,
3.5mm TBTA

Roger Williams Mint

for use at Cross Bay, Marine Parkway and Henry Hudson Bridges
same as obverse
NY630AV M 
75
TBTA
M 
75
TBTA
June 1976 26mm

6.8 g
copper plated reeded thin border rim,
3.5mm TBTA

Roger Williams Mint

for use at Triborough, Bronx Whitestone, Throgs Neck Bridges and Brooklyn Battery, Queens Midtown Tunnels.
same as obverse
NY630AW M 
100
TBTA
M 
100
TBTA
June 1976 27mm

8.2 g
white metal
plated
reeded thin border rim,
4mm TBTA
Roger Williams Mint

for use at Verrazano Narrows Bridge.
same as obverse
NY630AZ v1 M 
75
TBTA
M 
75
TBTA
1979 29mm

9.0 g
copper plated reeded thick border rim,
4mm TBTA
same as obverse
NY630AZ v2 M 
75
TBTA
M 
75
TBTA
1979 29mm

8.7 g
copper plated reeded thick border rim,
thick M
3.5mm TBTA
same as obverse
NY630BK M 
75
TBTA
M 
75
TBTA
ca. 1976 26mm

8.3 g
brass reeded thin border rim,
4mm TBTA
non-magnetic
same as obverse
all tokens above: authors collection
.
   An example of NY630AU in my collection, as well as others seen; appears to be copper or red brass, as it is reddish brown in color and not yellow as brass tokens in this issue are.

   It is postulated, that the different sized tokens for each denomination were designed in this manner for automatic sorting, by passing through progressively larger sorting screens. This aided in the use of automatic sorting and rolling machines. The smallest token (50) would drop first, followed by the next largest, the 75; and finally the 100.
   

   Most of the TBTA tokens above are commonly seen in heavily circulated conditions and are available for purchase via online auction or websites.
Minimally circulated token carry a premium. Unless gold plated, stamped Tiffany & Co and made into cuff links (I'm being facetious), you should not expect to nor should you pay more than a few dollars for each, price commensurate on condition.



Second Issue - "the Big M"
8/23/1980 - ?

   The second issue of TBTA tokens, of which only one denomination is known, the dollar (100). The Atwood Coffee catalog lists an issue date of 1980, and fortunately, the New York Times mentions the release:



   While not stated in the article, this token issue features a new design. On the obverse: the TBTA seal (bridge over tunnel over TBTA letters):

.
 
.
   and a large 
M over the large denomination 100 on the reverse, hence the nickname: the "Big M".  

   It is also with this series that a striped overprinting has first been witnessed, but which is
not listed in the Atwood-Coffee Catalog. The method used in application of the stripes is currently unknown: solvent based spray, anodized or electrostatically applied and heat cured powdercoat? Due to the thin light coating of the stripes, I lean towards a solvent based application for this issue, but this is unconfirmed.

   An interesting discovery is that the issue with black stripes is significantly more magnetic than other tokens from other issues; and the regular issue token (without stripes) of this issue which is not magnetic at all.

   By significantly more magnetic, I mean it really grabs my magnetic screwdriver, whereas the other slightly magnetic issues only lightly attract the tip of the screwdriver. And the pull exerted on my magnet increases the closer it comes to the stripes, as opposed to being a uniform pull around the entire token.

  
It is without any doubt, those stripes themselves have magnetic properties.


Atwood Coffee number obverse printing reverse printing issue date size (diameter)
weight (g)
material edge overprint notes obverse reverse
NY630BAa TBTA seal M
100
August 23, 1980
29mm

8.6 g
brass  reeded no regular issue
non-magnetic
NY630BAb
(unlisted)
TBTA seal M
100
1983? 29mm

8.6 g
brass plated?
reeded yes two parallel 4 mm black stripes
on reverse only
stripes significantly magnetic

(Staten Island resident or anti-counterfeiting?)
all tokens above: authors collection
.
   However a New York Times article 
dated August 17, 1984;"Plague of Pesos Afflicts Token Machines in City"  which publicized the disparaging use of slugs and counterfeits in New York City's token machines:

"The Mexican peso, a coin worth half a cent, has become a $132,000-a-year problem for the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority. The toll machines on the authority's bridges cannot distinguish between the $1.50 tokens they collect and the silver-colored peso. The use of pesos started soon after a new token was introduced with a fare increase in April 1982, authority officials said. Now, about 7,300 pesos are collected from fare machines each month - the equivalent of $11,000 a month in tolls. In an effort to combat the pesos, the authority plans to spend at least $11,600 a month to lease machines designed to distinguish its tokens from slugs, counterfeits and foreign coins."

"The peso, for example, is made from nickel and a sliver of silver, while the authority's tokens are solid brass."

   This article creates a question however: no tokens are known to be marked $1.50. Unless the issue with two black stripes is the $1.50 issue? The unabridged article may be read here (pages A1 and B2): New York Time Digital Archives

   It is also possible that the token with two stripes was created and used to differentiate between regular issue tokens and those that could be purchased by only by Staten Island residents.

   As can be read in the June 23, 1983 issue of the New York Times; New York Governor Mario Cuomo signed legislation the previous day granting residents of Staten Island a 25 cent discount on their toll on the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. This discount was because they had to pay tolls to enter the borough from either New Jersey or Brooklyn, so those residents that worked out of Staten Island, carried an additional financial burden in residing in Staten Island. This legislation and discounted token offered them some minor financial relief, and was only available to those residing in Staten Island. The New York Times article mentions a sticker that had to be applied to their vehicle that entitled them to purchase a pack of 20 special $1 tokens:


"Governor Cuomo today signed legislation giving Staten Islanders a special 25-cent discount on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge toll....

Under the law, residents of Staten Island may get stickers on their cars that will entitle them to buy packages of 20 special $1 tokens. The program is expected to begin by fall. The regular fare in each direction is $1.25."


   The full article can be read here (pages A1 and B6): New York Times Digital Archives. And fortunately, we have an image of that sticker:



   It is believed but unconfirmed; that the striped variety of tokens are those special tokens, so
the question now remains: whether the striped magnetic token was for differentiating between regular and Staten Island Resident issues or it was an anti-counterfeiting measure?

   I did inquire of this in my initial email to Ms. Hankins, who in turn passed along the inquiry to both the present and the retired Directors of Revenue Operations with their responses (and my comments in parenthesis):

“The tokens were brass tokens with metallic stripes which were used to prevent counterfeiting of tokens. The exterior of the tokens were copper plated, but sometimes the copper plate wore off and exposed the stripes.
(They were not copper plated - none of the M100 tokens have ever shown evidence or remains of copper plating. I personally think he may be referring the later issue of tokens with silver stripes as seen in the next series. PMG)

"The retired Director of Revenue Operations also thinks, but is not quite certain, the black stripes occurred on the M-100 token from metal oxidation which caused that type of steel to turn black."

.
   With this; we have unanswered questions pertaining to this issue that remain to be answered.

   In terms of collectability, both the regular issue and the striped variety of this issue are seldom seen, with the striped token being far more rare. The regular issue in average circulated issue is worth $5-10, and the striped issue $15 or more.



 Third Issue - "the List"
1982 - February 3, 1998


   The third issue tokens removed the numerical denomination from the reverse of the token and replaced it with a list of crossings that that token could be used at. There are two sizes: 25mm for the Minor Crossings (Marine, Henry Hudson, Cross Bay) and 29mm for the Major Crossings: (Triborough, Bronx Whitestone, Verrazano Narrows, Brooklyn Battery, Queens Midtown, Throgs Neck).

   Removing the denomination from the token makes logical sense as by this time, the tolls were now being raised on a frequent basis. By removing the denomination, the same token could be sold, regardless of the toll fare in the future, in similar concept to the present US Postal Service "Forever" stamp. Postage can be raised, but the USPS will not have to print new stamps with a different denomination on them, thereby saving money.
   

   And, by having two sizes; the TBTA could accommodate the cost differential between tokens of the major crossings (Triborough Bridge, Bronx Whitestone Bridge, Verrazano Narrows Bridge, Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Queens Midtown Tunnel, Throgs Neck Bridge), and those of the minor crossings (Marine Parkway Bridge, Henry Hudson Parkway Bridge and the Cross Bay Boulevard Bridge) which cost a lower fare.


   The obverse retains the TBTA seal. The large "Major Crossing" issue is now confirmed to have been struck by Roger Williams Mint. It is believed the smaller "Minor Crossing" issue was also, but this is unconfirmed.

White Metal Stripe 

   We also see a variety of these tokens
with a stripe, this time a single 5 millimeter white metal stripe.

   While at first, I thought the stripe was applied over the copper plate, and was to denote Rockaway and Staten Island Resident issues.

   But that "freak" token I have, got me thinking.
The Atwood Coffee defines this issue as copper plated. I would conclude the underlying token material is brass with copper plating, and the brass is showing through as a result of wear. Nothing surprising there, but:

   a) Note how the white metal stripe is almost completely worn off from the sunken areas of the obverse (TBTA seal / copper plated side) with remnants of the stripe on the raised rim and letters. Thinking logically would reflect that the stripe would be better protected in the sunken areas and would remain, with the raised areas more prone to rubbing & wear. Yet the opposite has happened.

   b) In contrast to this, the stripe is sharp and defined on the reverse (list of crossings / brass) side in both raised and sunken areas.

.

   c) Logic would also dictate the plating on both sides be evenly wear to almost the same degree. It would also be logical to conclude that if the copper plating wore off, so would have the white metal stripe. Does the white metal stripe adhere better to brass than copper?



NY630BD - copper obverse and brass reverse?
authors collection
.

.
   So this got me thinking - what if the white stripe was under the copper, and it was the copper plating itself that was wearing off? After finally coming to terms with myself in sacrificing a spare NY630BC (Minor Crossings) token, I conducted a little experiment.

   Following online instructions for removing copper plate with simple household chemicals, I commenced in doing so: one part 3% Hydrogen Peroxide, two parts White Vinegar (Acetic Acid). After 15 minutes the solution started to very lightly form bubbles on the token. After an hour, the solution took on a light blue tint and the copper plate began to dissolve revealing the white metal stripe and the brass token:

prior to soaking in solutionafter 15 minutes in one part 3% Hydrogen Peroxide /
two parts White Vinegar - bubbles!
.
.
.
after 6 hours (and one change of solution)  after 16 hours (and two more changes of solution)


   I changed the solution three times over 16 hours. The end result is clear and revealed that the white metal stripe is embedded into the brass stock, and not applied over the copper plate as I originally thought!
Therefore a strip of white metal is believed to have been inlaid at the time of rolling the brass stock, and prior to die punching the blank planchets.

   When I run my finger over the token, I can even feel a joint or transition between the white metal and the brass, where the white metal stripe is higher than the brass. Breaking out my trusty Herter micrometer (pre-WWII Germany), the thickness of the token at the rim is .069", while the overall thickness on the white metal strip at the rim is .072". This means that the combined thickness of the white metal strip is .003" inches thicker than the token. This equates to .0015" higher per side.

   And the copper plating? Just 5 ten thousandths of an inch at its thinnest (on top of the white metal stripe). This explains why the token wears through first at the stripe on the rim and why the stripe appears before the copper plate is worn off.



all dimensions taken at rim of Minor Crossings NY630BC token

   As for the composition of the white metal, it appears to be a lightly magnetic stainless steel (ferritic, not austenitic), and as it did not etch and remained polished with a high luster throughout the duration of the acid bath.

   So my initial conclusions previously published here were incorrect: a) the stripe was not applied over the copper plate, and therefore b) the stripe could NOT used to identify discount Resident issues, as it would be hidden under the copper plate. Therefore, it is simply an anti-counterfeiting device.

   And yes; while this is all highly technical for just the average collector, this experiment bears out that the white metal stripe variety of tokens aren't a variety at all, just a more worn example of the tokens.

   If one watches the online auction listings closely, you will note many tokens have the the metallic stripe in varying degrees of visibility. This is all due to handling. As the copper plating wore off, more and more of the white metal stripe showing through and visible, (and not the other way around with the stripe wearing off).

   Remember, a lot of these tokens were used in automated toll booths with catch baskets; so regular use of said token included being roughly handled, not to mention the TBTA's automated counting and rolling machines.


   This experiment also explains the existence of that half copper / half brass token in my collection. However it occurred, the copper plate was removed from one side of the token revealing the white metal stripe and the brass.

   As a result of this experiment, we can now conclude that all the "List" tokens have that white metal stripe embedded, therefore eliminating the need for a variety listing in Atwood Coffee or here. Therefore, I have removed the stripe variety NY630BCb and NYC630BDb from the table below.

Atwood Coffee
number
obverse printing reverse printing issue
date
size (diameter)
weight (g)
material edge overprint notes obverse reverse
NY 630 BC TBTA seal MARINE
HENRY HUDSON
CROSS BAY

M
1980 25mm

6.3 g
copper plated reeded no minor crossing
regular issue
NY 630 BD TBTA seal TRIBOROUGH
BRONX WHITESTONE

VERRAZANO NARROWS
BROOKLYN BATTERY

QUEENS MIDTOWN

THROGS NECK

M
1982 29mm

8.2 g
copper plated reeded no major crossing
regular issue

minted by Roger Williams
qty minted: 7,500,000
all tokens above: authors collection
.
Both issues extremely common.

.

.

.



 Fourth Issue - "the Residents"
1994 - 2015(?)

   As stated, the fourth issue of tokens is believed to have been minted to replace the striped tokens, but to have been used along side the general issues tokens of the Third Issue.

   The TBTA issued this series of tokens in 1994, which are now specially minted in relief (raised) markings on the reverse: ROCKAWAY RESIDENT
M around the circumference of the rim, with CROSSBAY AND MARINE PARKWAY in the center, or STATEN ISLAND RESIDENT M around the circumference of the rim, and VERRAZANO NARROWS BRIDGE in the center. The obverse still carries the TBTA Seal in relief.    

   As for cataloging, these two token issues are now listed in the borough specific listings of the Atwood Coffee: Queens - NY631 Queens and Staten Island - NY632, as opposed to all the previous types all listed under New York City - NY630.
   

   It is also known that the Rockaway Resident tokens could only be purchased at Cross Bay Bridge and Marine Parkway Bridge toll booths; likewise the Staten Island Resident tokens only available at the Verrazano Narrows Bridge toll booths and could only be purchased by those residents with the proper pass or sticker in the car window.

   After my initial email, I received a reply from Gibson Olpp; marketing manager for Osborne Coin (successor to Roger Williams Mint).

Made in 1993 for Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority Tokens

5,254,000 -  1.095” Staten Island Token

4,246,300 -  0.895” Rockaway Resident Token

That is as far back as the records go.

.
   So, a little more information never hurts. But, as with most research;
one question answered finds one more needs to be asked: Roger Williams Mint lists manufacturing size in SAE (inches) - Atwood Coffee has them in millimeters.

   From what I am able to gather by reviewing the toll schedules, and following confirmation from Ms. Hankins; the "Resident" tokens were sold and accepted long after the regular issue "List" token were removed from circulation. I, in error; had been under the conclusion all token sales ceased February 3, 1998;, but again, I was incorrect.

   The resident tokens remained for sale to said residents because of the specific language as stated in the New York State statute, which provided those residents of Staten Island and Rockaway a discounted token. After the physical tokens stopped being accepted in 2017, said residents were eligible for "e-Tokens" as so called in the schedules. As they are still called "tokens", the letter of the law is upheld.

   These last two token issues were finally withdrawn from use; first at Cross Bay and Marine Parkway Bridges on April 30, 2017; and by September 30, 2017 at the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. 



Atwood Coffee number obverse printing reverse printing issue date size (diameter)
weight (g)
material edge overprint notes obverse reverse
NY 631 Y TBTA seal ROCKAWAY RESIDENT  M

CROSSBAY AND MARINE PARKWAY BRIDGES
1994 0.895"
(23mm +/-)

6.0 g
brass plated reeded no minor crossing

minted by: Roger Williams
qty minted: 4,246,300
NY 632 D TBTA seal STATEN ISLAND RESIDENT M

VERRAZANO NARROWS BRIDGE
1994 1.095"
(28mm +/-)

8.9 g
brass plated smooth no major crossing

minted by Roger Williams
qty minted: 5,254,000
all tokens above: authors collection
.
Footnotes:
1 = weights by author via OHaus triplebeam Series 700
.

.
   In regards to collectability, the Resident Tokens are more readily seen in much better conditions than that of their previous issue counterparts, as they only issued for approximately 4 years and despite having been circulated for 13 years. However they are a little scarcer in my opinion. Higher grade examples should not cost you more than $10 each.
.

.
Triborough Bridge 50th Anniversary Commemorative Issue   

   While not a true fiscal issue used for paying a toll, George S. Cuhaj offered the following item for inclusion into the topic.

   It is a Commemorative Medallion issued for the 50th Anniversary of the Triborough Bridge. Its dimensions are identical with that of the toll issues, but this token is gilt plated (gold). From references it was only issued to employees of the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority. It was issued in the plastic protective case with spacer ring just as you see..


Triborough Bridge 50th Anniversary Commemorative Medallion - 1986
gilt plated, in protective case,
issued to employees
Roger Williams Mint
(quantity minted unknown, but under 10,000)
collection of George S. Cuhaj
..

.


The End of the Line for the Tokens

   Testing of the E-ZPass RFID toll collection system by the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority began in 1991, as seen in the Staten Island Advance article dated February 26, 1991.

   In just seven short years, as seen in the New York Times, token sales ended on February 3, 1998 with the widespread use of E-ZPass (radio frequency transmitter tag) being instituted. The transcribed article reads as follows:


The bridge and tunnel token is one step closer to becoming a collector's item.

In the latest nod to the ubiquity of the E-Z Pass, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Sunday stopped selling tokens at six of its nine tunnels and bridges in New York City.

The move was not exactly a surprise. Last year, the M.T.A. stopped selling the tokens in bulk at those six crossings -- leaving the $7 round-trip transaction as the only one for which motorists could buy tokens. Four months ago, the authority removed its tokens-only baskets from its tollbooths. And last month, the authority reported that only 2 percent of the estimated 730,000 vehicles that crossed its bridges and tunnels daily used tokens.

Now, anyone who wants to buy a token can do so only at three crossings: on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, where the toll is collected in only one direction, Staten Island residents -- and no one else -- can buy a package of tokens worth 5 or 10 round-trips. Token packages will also be sold for the Cross Bay and Marine Parkway Bridges, in the Rockaways, which are less expensive than the other crossings and use a smaller-sized token.

Those who still have tokens can still use them at any of the crossings. Frank Pascual, a spokesman for M.T.A. Bridges and Tunnels, said, ''We'll take them as long as you have them.'

The authority introduced the E-Z Pass in 1995, saying that it would shave precious minutes off rush-hour commuting time and eliminate the hassle of having to fumble for coins and bills to pay the toll. 

The small E-Z Pass transponders are mounted on windshields and are read electronically at toll gates that automatically deduct the fares from customers' accounts.

Despite some initial missteps, the E-Z Pass proved to be wildly popular. In 1997, the M.T.A. projected that 170,000 transponders would be installed by year's end. The actual figure turned out to be 1.2 million, Mr. Pascual said.


   Reading the article a little more carefully, I have realized that token sales stopped at 6 of 9 crossings, but remained on sale for Staten Island Residents (Verrazano Narrows Bridge) as well as the Rockaway Residents (Cross Bay and Marine Parkway Bridges).

   These tokens are shown for sale as late as the 2015 toll schedule in the pdf file. The exact date of when sales of these tokens ceased is not yet known. It is therefore not known if sales stopped at the cessation of acceptance at the dates below or some time before.

   Eventually, acceptance of the remaining tokens was phased out and ceased as well. This took place on two separate dates, those being: first at Cross Bay and Marine Parkway Bridges on April 30, 2017; and by September 30, 2017 at the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. 

   All toll booths at all crossings have since been removed, and toll collection automated to E-ZPass and Tolls By Mail. The full service / receipts / toll collectors are gone. The exact change lanes with their white plastic catch baskets and moving arms are gone. 

   Have no fear! Those people that still hold tokens can exchange tokens (but why would you?!?!) through a token refund kit from MTA Bridges & Tunnels. 

   On October 1, 2019; I actually called the phone number on the MTA Bridges & Tunnels website for the token refund kit. The nice lady who answered the telephone took my information and asked how many tokens I would be sending in. I told her none, and there was a pregnant pause on the line. I then explained I was a TBTA toll token collector and only wanted the refund kit as part of my token collection. She was quite amused and said that I was the first one that she ever knew to ever do that!

MTA Bridges & Tunnels - Token Refund Kit
authors collection
.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

.
Toll Receipts

   Undoubtedly, the most "disposable" of the memorabilia: the toll receipt. If I could tell you how many were thrown away, and how many I found under the seat of my grandfathers car.  

   I will not hide the fact that I had an affection for traveling, beginning as a young child. And encouraging this, my father would ask for maps, receipts and other goodies at every toll booth during trips; whether it was just across the bridge or down to Florida. I had a pile of them in a box under the seat of the family van. Verrazano, Goethals, New Jersey Turnpike, Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, you name it. All the way down the East Coast from Brooklyn, New York to Miami Beach, Florida, where my grandparents lived; and New York State Thruway, Southern State Parkway, Palisades Parkway, Garden State Parkway, and the New Jersey Turnpike.

   But, like the proverbial box of baseball cards or comic books, they were disposed of during a cleaning session at some point. Mine are probably all decayed under the Fountain Avenue landfill by now. But I have managed to accumulate a few since then.

November 13, 1969 (incorrect)
Verrazano Narrows Bridge - $20.00 token sale
TBTA did not offer tokens until 1976, and packaged in those amounts:
twenty .50 for $10, twenty .75 for $15.00 or twenty 1.00 for $20.00
.
Therefore I postulate the receipt was issued between June 1976 and 1980,
date of the first toll increase after those first token packs were offered.

authors collection
.

.
unknown date
Verrazano Narrows Bridge - $20.00 
authors collection
copyright
2019
Philip M. Goldstein
ca. 1989 - $2.00
This one is particularly interesting as the toll collector used
an actual ticket punch to mark the sale.
authors collection
.

.
August 8, 1976-1980
Crossbay Parkway Bridge - .50
collection of George S. Cuhaj
.

.
August 5, 1978?
Whitestone Bridge - .75
collection of George S. Cuhaj
August 13, 1978
Bronx Whitestone Bridge - $1.00
collection of George S. Cuhaj
.

.
May 20, ca. 1975
Triborough Bridge - .75
collection of George S. Cuhaj
April 28, 1975 - 1980
Throgs Neck Bridge - .75
collection of George S. Cuhaj
.

.
December 5, 1979
Verrazano Narrows Bridge - $1.00
authors collection
.

.
October 22, (1975-1982)
Verrazano Narrows Bridge - $1.00
authors collection
September 3, (1975-82)
Verrazano Narrows Bridge - $1.00
collection of George S. Cuhaj
.

.
September 16, 1992
Queens Midtown Tunnel $2.50
authors collection
September 16, 1992
Queens Midtown Tunnel $2.50
authors collection
.

.
May 17, 1994
Brooklyn Battery Tunnel
- $3.00
authors collection
.

.
October 12, 1995
Verrazano Narrows Bridge - $6.00
authors collection
February 20, 1996
Brooklyn Battery Tunnel - $3.00
authors collection



TABLE OF CONTENTS



Internal Documents & Reference Materials

Marine Parkway Authority - 1937
collection of MTA Archives
.

.
New York City Tunnel Authority - ca. 1940
.

.
New York City Tunnel Authority - 1942
Toll Scrip accounting from November 1940 (opening of Queen Midtown Tunnel) to March 1942
New York City Tunnel Authority - ca. 1942
Toll Schedule, Scrip Issues and Wartime Scrip Book Plan
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - ca. 1966
Toll Book Order Form - Form A-111
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - ca. 1973
Toll Book Order Form - Form A-111
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - June 13, 1973
Memorandum, re: Special Ticket overprinting
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - April 19, 1982
Toll Book Order Form for Commercial Vehicles, handout at toll books
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - April 20, 1983
Toll Book Order Form - Form A-111
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - undated
Toll Book Order Form - expedient for hand out?
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - undated
Toll Book Order Form
.

.
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - June 19, 1986
Memorandum, re: old barcode scrip, new barcode scrip sizes, colors denominations
Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority - December 8, 1986
Intra-governmental order form for Toll Books
.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Historical & Current Toll Fares for the TBTA
All vehicle classes are listed for crossing opening; for subsequent toll hikes, only passenger autos are listed.
See
.pdf file for tolls for additional vehicle classes, Staten Island & Rockaway Resident, Carpool, E-ZPass and E-token toll discount amounts.

Notes:
franchise buses were only allowed on bridges, not tunnels
cars with semi-trailer = trailer with one axle (total three axles)
cars with trailer = trailer with two axles (total four axles)
what I refer to as cars are listed as passenger automobiles

Major Crossings:

Triborough
Bridge

1936
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge
1939
Queens Midtown Tunnel
1940
Brooklyn Battery
Tunnel

1950
Throgs Neck
Bridge

1961
Verrazano Narrows Bridge
upper deck: 1964
lower deck: 1969
passenger autos
trucks < 2 tons
trucks 2-5 tons
trucks > 5 tons
buses
three axles trucks
four axle trucks &  
cars w/ trailer
franchise buses
motorcycles
bicycles
25¢
25¢
35¢
50¢
50¢
60¢
75¢
.
25¢
15¢
10¢
passenger autos
trucks < 2 tons
trucks 2-5 tons
trucks > 5 tons
buses
three axles trucks
four axle trucks &
cars w/ trailer
franchise buses
motorcycles
bicycles
25¢
25¢
35¢
50¢
50¢
60¢
.
75¢
15¢
25¢
10¢
passenger autos
trucks, 2 axle < 2 tons
trucks, 2 axle 2-5 tons
trucks, 2 axle > 5 tons
2 axle bus (non-franchise)
3 axle trucks, tractors,  
non-franchise buses &  
cars w/ semi-trailer:
4 axles trucks, tractors,
non-franchise buses or  
cars with trailers
each additional axle
motorcycles
25¢
25¢
50¢
60¢
50¢
.
.
75¢
.
.
$1.00
35¢
15¢
cars (as proposed 1939)
cars (actual upon open)
trucks, 2 axle < 2 tons
trucks, 2 axle 2-5 tons
trucks, 2 axle > 5 tons
3 axle trucks, tractors,  
non-franchise buses &  
cars w/ semi-trailer
4 axles trucks, tractors, 
non-franchise buses or 
cars with trailers
each additional axle
motorcycle
25¢
35¢
35¢
50¢
75¢
.
.
$1.00
.
.
$1.25
35¢
25¢
passenger autos
trucks 2 axle < 2 tons
trucks 2 axle 2-5 tons
trucks 2 axle > 5 tons
buses > 10 persons
3 axle trucks, tractors, and  
buses or cars with semi-trailer
4 axle trucks, tractors, buses   
or car w/ trailer
each additional axle
franchise buses
motorcycles
25¢
25¢
40¢
60¢
50¢
.
75¢
.
$1.00
35¢
25¢
15¢
passenger autos and  
trucks 2 axle < 2 ton
cars w / trailer
trucks 2 axle 2-5 tons
trucks 2 axle > 5 ton &  
cars with 2 axle trailers
2 axles buses > 10 people
3 axles trucks, tractors,  
or buses
4 axle trucks, tractors  
or buses
5 axle vehicles
each additional axle
motorcycles

.
50¢ 
75¢
75¢
.
$1.00
$1.00
.
$1.25
.
$1.50
$2.00
50¢
50¢
1/5/1972 50¢ 1/5/1972 50¢ 1/5/1972 50¢ 1/5/1972 70¢ 1/5/1972 50¢ 1/5/1972 75¢
3/1/1976 75¢ 3/1/1976 75¢ 3/1/1976 75¢ 3/1/1976 75¢ 3/1/1976 75¢ 3/1/1976 $1.00
5/19/1980 $1.00 5/19/1980 $1.00 5/19/1980 $1.00 5/19/1980 $1.00 5/19/1980 $1.00 5/19/1980 $1.00 - no increase
4/19/1982 $1.25 4/19/1982 $1.25 4/19/1982 $1.25 4/19/1982 $1.25 4/19/1982 $1.25 4/19/1982 $1.25
1/3/1984 $1.50 1/3/1984 $1.50 1/3/1984 $1.50 1/3/1984 $1.50 1/3/1984 $1.50 1/3/1984 $1.50
1/1/1986 $1.75 1/1/1986 $1.75 1/1/1986 $1.75 1/1/1986 $1.75 1/1/1986 $1.75 1/1/1986 $1.75
2/7/1987 $2.00 2/7/1987 $2.00 2/7/1987 $2.00 2/7/1987 $2.00 2/7/1987 $2.00 2/7/1987 $2.00
no change 3/15/1987 $4.00 - tolls now doubled
                 but collected
                 NY bound only
7/16/1989 $2.50 7/16/1989 $2.50 7/16/1989 $2.50 7/16/1989 $2.50 7/16/1989 $2.50 7/16/1989 $5.00
1/31/1993 $3.00 1/31/1993 $3.00 1/31/1993 $3.00 1/31/1993 $3.00 1/31/1993 $3.00 1/31/1993 $6.00
3/24/1996 $3.50 3/24/1996 $3.50 3/24/1996 $3.50 3/24/1996 $3.50 3/24/1996 $3.50 3/24/1996 $7.00
5/18/2003 $4.00 5/18/2003 $4.00 5/18/2003 $4.00 5/18/2003 $4.00 5/18/2003 $4.00 5/18/2003 $8.00
The NY State Supreme Court ruled that the 5/18/2003 toll hike was not valid and ordered the toll rates reverted back to their prior amounts; however the actual tolls at the crossing were not reduced due to the appeals and automatic stay process
6/4/2003 $3.50 6/4/2003 $3.50 6/4/2003 $3.50 6/4/2003 $3.50 6/4/2003 $3.50 6/4/2003 $7.00
The NY State Appellate Court overturned the lower courts' ruling and allowed the TBTA to raise the toll tariffs to the original 5/18/2003 rates. In actuality they were already at that amount.
7/15/2003 $4.00 7/15/2003 $4.00 7/15/2003 $4.00 7/15/2003 $4.00 7/15/2003 $4.00 7/15/2003 $8.00
3/15/2005 $4.50 3/15/2005 $4.50 3/15/2005 $4.50 3/15/2005 $4.50 3/15/2005 $4.50 3/15/2005 $9.00
3/16/2008 $5.00 3/16/2008 $5.00 3/16/2008 $5.00 3/16/2008 $5.00 3/16/2008 $5.00 3/16/2008 $10.00
7/12/2009 $5.50 7/12/2009 $5.50 7/12/2009 $5.50 7/12/2009 $5.50 7/12/2009 $5.50 7/12/2009 $11.00
12/30/2010 $6.50 12/30/2010 $6.50 12/30/2010 $6.50 12/30/2010 $6.50 12/30/2010 $6.50 12/30/2010 $13.00
3/23/2013 $7.50 3/23/2013 $7.50 3/23/2013 $7.50 3/23/2013 $7.50 3/23/2013 $7.50 3/23/2013 $15.00
3/22/2015 $8.00 3/22/2015 $8.00 3/22/2015 $8.00 3/22/2015 $8.00 3/22/2015 $8.00 3/22/2015 $16.00
3/9/2017 $8.50 3/9/2017 $8.50 3/9/2017 $8.50 3/9/2017 $8.50 3/9/2017 $8.50 3/9/2017 $17.00
3/19/2019
to present
$9.50 3/19/2019
to present
$9.50 3/19/2019
to present
$9.50 3/19/2019
to present
$9.50 3/19/2019
to present
$9.50 3/19/2019
to present
$19.00
Triborough Bridge
Bronx-Whitestone Bridge
Queens Midtown Tunnel
Brooklyn Battery Tunnel
Throgs Neck Bridge
Verrazano Narrows Bridge

.

.
Minor Crossings:

Henry Hudson Bridge
1936
Marine Parkway Bridge
7/3/1937

Cross Bay Bridge
1939 (rebuilt 1970)
passenger cars and motorcycles
(Henry Hudson Parkway: cars & motorcycles only - no commercial traffic)
10¢ passenger auto:
trucks axle < 2 ton:
trucks 2 axles 2-5 ton:
trucks 2 axles > 5 tons,  
 & charter buses:
truck, tractor 3 axle, or  
passenger car w/ semi-trailer:
truck, tractor 4 axle  
or passenger car w/ trailer:
franchise bus:
motorcycle:
bicycle:
15¢
25¢
35¢

35¢

40¢

50¢
10¢
10¢
passenger auto:
trucks axle < 2 ton:
trucks 2 axles 2-5 ton:
trucks 2 axles > 5 tons,  
 & charter buses:
truck, tractor 3 axle, or  
passenger car w/ semi-trailer:
truck, tractor 4 axle  
or passenger car w/ trailer:
franchise bus:
motorcycle:
bicycle:
10¢
25¢
35¢

35¢

40¢

50¢
10¢
10¢
1939 10¢ toll on Marine Parkway Bridge reduced
upon Cross Bay Bridge opening
1939 10¢
1970 10¢ 1970 10¢ 
1/5/1972 25¢ 1/5/1972 25¢ 1/5/1972 25¢
3/1/1976 50¢ 3/1/1976 50¢ 3/1/1976 50¢
6/2/1980 60¢ 6/16/1980 75¢ 6/16/1980 75¢
4/19/1982 90¢ 4/19/1982 90¢ 4/19/1982 90¢
1/3/1984 no increase 1/3/1984 no increase 1/3/1984 no increase
2/7/1987 $1.00 2/7/1987 $1.00 2/7/1987 $1.00
7/6/1989 $1.25 7/16/1989 $1.25 7/16/1989 $1.25
1/31/1993 $1.50 1/31/1993 $1.50 1/31/1993 $1.50
3/24/1996 $1.75 3/24/1996 $1.75 3/24/1996 $1.75
5/18/2003 $2.00 5/18/2003 $2.00 5/18/2003 $2.00
3/15/2005 $2.25 3/15/2005 $2.25 3/15/2005 2.25
3/16/2008 $2.75 3/16/2008 $2.50 3/16/2008 $2.50
7/12/2009 $3.00 7/12/2009 $2.75 7/12/2009 2.75
12/30/2010 $4.00 12/30/2010 $3.25  12/30/2010 $3.25
3/3/2013 $5.00 3/3/2013 $3.75  tolls suspended on Marine Parkway and Cross Bay Bridges following Hurricane Sandy from 11/4 to 12/1/2012 3/3/2013 $3.75
3/22/2015 $5.50 3/22/2015 $4.00 3/22/2015 $4.00
3/19/2017 $6.00 3/19/2017 $4.25 3/19/2017 $4.25
3/31/2019
to present
$7.00 3/31/2019
to present
$4.75 3/31/2019
to present
$4.75
Henry Hudson BridgeMarine Parkway BridgeCross Bay Bridge

.


.

Current Toll Fares TBTA / MTA Crossings - Tolls By Mail (Full Price)

.


Just announced: 
Split tolling will return on the Verrazzano Narrows Bridge. 
Legislation passed the House on December 18, 2019 and is expected to be signed by the Senate and the President by end of the week.
Tolls will be $9.50 each direction until next fare raise.



Bronx Whitestone Bridge
Throgs Neck Bridge
Triborough "Robert F. Kennedy" Bridge
Brooklyn Battery "Hugh L. Carey" Tunnel
Queens Midtown Tunnel
Verrazano Narrows Bridge
(toll collected entering
Staten Island / westbound only)

Cross Bay "Veterans Memorial" Bridge
and
Marine Parkway "Gil Hodges" Bridge
Henry Hudson Parkway Bridge
two axles auto
two axles
three axles
four axles
five axles
six axles
seven axles
additional axles
$9.50
$19.00
$31.29
$39.12
$51.41
$59.24
$73.76
$11.18
two axles auto
two axles
three axles
four axles
five axles
six axles
seven axles
additional axles
$19.00
$38.00
$62.58
$78.24
$102.82
$118.48
$147.52
$22.36
two axles auto
two axles
three axles
four axles
five axles
six axles
seven axles
additional axles
$4.75
$9.50
$15.65
$19.56
$25.71
$29.62
$36.88
$5.59
two axles auto only
no trucks allowed
$7.00

for Current E-ZPass and Commuter Discount toll amounts, please refer to the MTA Bridges & Tunnels website at: MTA Bridges & Tunnels - Tolls


PDF file of official toll tables - ca. 1938 to present;
for all vehicles classes; all notations, E-ZPass, Carpool, Franchise Buses, Staten Island and Rockaway Resident, E-Token, Staten Island E-Token and Rockaway E-Token Rates
.

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS





.
Port of New York Authority / Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
.
   
.
   For those tunnels and bridges that are interstate, that is connecting New York and New Jersey; these crossings fall under the jurisdiction of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey:


crossing name date opened
Holland Tunnel November 13, 1927
Goethals Bridge original span: June 29, 1928
new eastbound span: June 10, 2017
new westbound span: May 21, 2018
Outerbridge Crossing June 29, 1928
George Washington Bridge upper deck: October 24, 1931
lower deck:  August 29, 1962
Bayonne Bridge November 15, 1931
deck height raised
northbound lanes opened: February 20, 2017
southbound lanes February 11, 2019,
Lincoln Tunnel
formerly "Midtown Hudson Tunnel"
center tube: December 22, 1937
north tube: February 1, 1945
south tube: May 25, 1957
   
   The Port of New York Authority was originally established on April 30, 1921 via an interstate compact between the states of New York and New Jersey. This compact was enacted by the U.S. Congress. The PNYA 
was the first such agency in the U.S. so created under a provision in the Constitution of the United States permitting interstate compacts.


   However, the first of the vehicular crossings built, the Holland Tunnel; was originally planned by the New York State Bridge & Tunnel Commission. The Holland Tunnel, which opened in 1927; was operated as a joint venture of the New York State Bridge & Tunnel Commission and the New Jersey Interstate Bridge & Tunnel Commission.    

   In 1930, following a disagreement between those two commissions, the Port of New York Authority was contracted to operate the Holland Tunnel from April 21, 1930 through March 1, 1931. At this time, The 
Port of New York Authority would assume all responsibility for operation, repair, and governance. The expanded Port of New York Authority took over operations for as well as planned for the planning and operation of the Goethals Bridge, Outerbridge Crossing, George Washington Bridge, Bayonne Bridge and the Lincoln Tunnel, when each crossing opened. It was also responsible for the operation of many of the shipping terminals, as well as LaGuardia and Idlewild / J. F. K Airports as each opened.

   
The Port of New York Authority would eventually being renamed the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in 1972, to better reflect the bi-state operation. Frankly, New Jersey did not like being left out, the bunch of whiners! Hell, they have been trying to steal the Statue of Liberty from New York for decades! LOL - just kidding Jerseyites!    

   Now, with this short history covered, lets get down to the fiscal issues.

   As far as my personal collection, the earliest piece of toll exonumia; or more accurately a toll receipt (as opposed to scrip) that I own, is for the Holland Tunnel opening day on November 13, 1927. Other than the one in my collection, I have seen one other from opening day (very exorbitantly overpriced), and others from several days later.
Holland Tunnel Toll Receipt - opening day: November 13, 1927
 3
 " (height) - 3" (width) - .008 (thickness)
.

.
   The toll schedule for the Holland Tunnel when opened, was as follows:

Vehicle Type Group # Rate
Motorcycle I 0.25
Passenger Automobile, with a capacity up to 7 passengers,
ambulance or hearse
II 0.50
Bus, (up to and including 29 passenger seating capacity) III 1.00
Truck, up to 2 tons IV 0.50
2 ton+ to 5 ton Truck V 0.75
5 ton+ to 10 ton Truck VI 1.00
Trucks exceeding 10 tons capacity and not exceeding
15 tons Gross Weight and not exceeding 12 tons axle load
VII 2.00
Vehicles admitted by special permit, only VIII Special*
 

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS


Port of New York Authority Scrip

.

.

The First Scrip Issue for New York


   The first known toll scrip to be issued for the interstate crossings in the New York Metropolitan Area, is the TS series of 1935 issued by Port of New York Authority. It is presumed TS stands for "Toll Scrip".

   
In the preparation for creating this website, my research on the web revealed a piece of this scrip to be displayed in the Hoboken Historical Museum, where it is stated,

"While undated, toll scrip was not issued until August 9, 1951."

.
   As best as my research has uncovered, this description is blatantly incorrect. Multiple facts that contradict that statement are known, and are as follows:
  1. The Twenty-Five Cents scrip in my collection, marked Series TS1-1935, clearly lacks Lincoln Tunnel in the list of crossings on the face. This makes sense, as the Lincoln Tunnel did not open until December 22, 1937, and thus with the scrip being issued two years prior in 1935.
    (The next denomination in that series, Fifty Cents, Series TS2-1935, does list the Lincoln Tunnel as do all other subsequent issues of scrip.)

    .
  2. The 25 cent script carries the facsimile signature (in lower right corner) of John E. Ramsey, who held the position of General Manager of the Port of New York Authority, from 1930 through 1942. It was not until 1942 that Austin J. Tobin became executive director, and of whom would hold the position until 1972.
    .
  3. Furthermore, it is within the Port of New York Authority annual reports themselves dated 1932 and 1933, that state tickets and scrip were created in those discussions covering "continuation tickets" and in 1933 with the issuance of toll scrip.
    .
  4. As Austin Tobin commenced holding his position of Executive Director beginning in 1942, and that this date still predates the statement "not issued until August 9, 1951."
    .
  5. And, then there is the New York Time article at right, dated December 31, 1934.
   .
   Also to be considered, is that appointment date (1942) of Austin J. Tobin to executive directorship; many of the notes dated 1935 (and with the exception of the 1951 and 1960 dated scrip) obviously must have printed after 1942 for his name to even be listed in that position on that note!

   So with all things being said, the Hoboken Museums description is erroneous and needs correction. I have sent them numerous emails, but to no response nor any revision on their website has been forthcoming.

   And this is yet another reason why I felt it was necessary to get this website published.

Please note:
   Before we progress further, you will notice I have displayed the issues grouped by denomination, not by issue year (1935, 1951, 1960, etc). I have organized them in this fashion, so as to more easily show the differences of design between issues of the same denomination, instead of the reader having to scroll up and down this page to compare.


   Here is where the scrip history gets interesting and is probably going to be a learning curve for all of us.

   Note the Series TS1 - 1935 on the twenty-five cent; then TS2 - 1935 on the fifty cent, TS3 - 1935 on the seventy five cent, etcetera, etcetera. The Series TS number advances from TS1 to TS2 to TS3 based on the denomination, not the year. The date remains unchanged. 

   BUT! We can plainly see, there is a One and 50/100 Dollar ($1.50) is marked TS5-1951. This piece now confirms additional date issues. In addition to this, a recently acquired TS1 - 25 Cents piece is marked TS1-196o. So we know have three distinct issue dates. As for the new design notes, we know 1969 and 1970 exist, but more about those later.

   If other years exist for the older design of the Port of New York Authority scrip, they remain to be discovered.

   So, it is safe to conclude that the TS code (TS1, TS2, etc) denotes the denomination (and not an actual series year)
:

TS1 = 25¢
TS2 = 50¢
TS3 = 75¢
TS4 = $1.00
TS5 = $1.50
TS7 = $3.00

It is unknown at this time if TS6 exists - but it is believed to, and the denomination should be in the $1.75 to $2.75 range


.
   And so, it is the year that follows the TS number, which in fact denotes the series issue:


1935, 1951, 1960, and 1969, 1970 (newer Statue of Liberty design)
.
.

Printers:

   The printer for most of the series, was none other than the renowned printer of maps and atlases, Rand McNally; as these issues carry their name.
.

.
Intaglio & Offset Lithography

   There are two known printing methods for the Port of New York Authority scrip. The first is known as intaglio printing (pronounced in-TAH-lee-OH - the "g" is silent. And after all these years, I find out I've been pronouncing it wrong! )

   Intaglio printing is accomplished by intricately engraved metal plates usually made of steel, but copper can be used also. As copper is softer, it is not as durable as steel plates, but is suitable for lower quantity runs. The image design and lettering is engraved in reverse or negative on intaglio plates. When run through a printing press, the image when transferred directly to paper, and therefore is now a positive image. The intaglio method is direct transfer from the plate to the paper. It gives the ink on the notes a slight relief (raised) feel, and also results in very crisp designs. Intaglio is also an expensive, time consuming process; taking hundreds of hours per design. And one slip or error, the plate is ruined and needs to be redone.
This is the method of printing used for United States currency (paper money) as well as many other countries throughout the world. The intricacies of the design and the texture or "feel" of the printing make it difficult to counterfeit and the plates are durable for millions of impressions.

   The other printing method known to have been used in printing the scrip, is the offset lithography process. Offset lithography printing is a method of mass-production printing in which the images are etched in negative onto a thin metal plate by
a photographic and chemical process. Once the metal plate is installed on the press; the process utilizes the immiscibility of oil based inks and water based "fountain" solution - the image etched on the plate which will hold the ink, and the unprinted area "unetched", which does not. This is then transferred (offset) to rubber blankets or rollers and once again to the print media (paper). The print media, usually paper, does not come into direct contact with the metal plate as it does in the intaglio process. This lithographic process is much cheaper and less labor intensive for documents and printed matter of mass production but of a disposable or replaceable value. Most of the "quick print" shops that existed and some still do today, are based on this offset process. This was all prior to the advent of cheap color copies and stores that offered mass production printing such as Kinkos, Staples and OfficeMax.
.
   Delving further into the intricacies of the designs of Port of New York Authority scrip, there are many unique features of the TS1 - 1935 25 cent note that bear pointing out, when compared to notes of following series:
  1. Only the Series TS1 - 1935 25 cent note is known to have been printed via the intaglio method. (the 50 cent MAY have been, but this is unconfirmed). 
    .
  2. The first issue is not marked for a printer, however it has been learned that the Rand McNally did offer intaglio printing and since subsequent issues were printed by them, it is highly likely they printed this intaglio issue as well.
    .
  3. The facsimile signature in lower right corner is believed to be that of John E. Ramsey, who held the position of General Manager of the Port of New York Authority, from 1930 through 1942. It was not until 1942 that Austin J. Tobin became executive director, and he held the position from 1942 – 1972. His signature appears on Series TS2 50 cent and all subsequent denomination issues.
    .
  4. The Series TS1-1935 (on right edge of note) has the same color red ink as the serial number. As the serial number (as well as any additional colors (if any) in the design would be printed by numbering machines in a second "pass" of the uncut sheets of notes through another printing press. It therefore appears that both the serial number AND Series TS1-1935 was imprinted after the main printing of the note. (On subsequent issues, the series number and year is the same color as main face printing of the note and therefore the series & year appear to have added to the main design, with only the red serial number being added in a second pass.
    .
  5. Only this TS1-1935 issue is printed on light card stock - measuring .010" thick. (Paper thickness is .005" on all following lithography issues.)


Design Differences on same Series Notes
.
   As my research digs deeper and as a result of my referencing old catalogs and auction listings; it now appears there are THREE distinct designs for the TS series:

Guilloché Back,
Frame Back with Banknote Roman Numerals,
and
Frame Back with Agency (Square Block) Numerals
Frame Back - no numerals



   It was thought the
guilloché back was exclusive to the Series 1935 .25 cent notes; the frame back with Bank Roman numerals on both 1935 and 1951 series, and the frame back with Agency square block numerals on 1935, 1951 and 1960 series notes. With the purchase of two complete books of $1.00 - 1935 and $1.50 - 1951, both of which have guilloche backs, this is obviously no longer the case.


Single Frame w/ Guilloché Back
Double Frame w/
Banknote Roman (serif) Numerals
Single Frame w/ Agency (sans-serif square block) NumeralsSingle Frame only
no Numerals
confirmed denominations:
1935 - .25
1935 - .50
1935 - 1.00
1951 - 1.50
confirmed denominations:
1935 - .50
1935 - .75
1935 - $1.00
1935 - $1.50
confirmed denominations:
1935 - .25
1960 - .25
1935 - .50
1935 - .75
1935 - $1.00
1951 - $1.50
confirmed denominations:
1935 - .50
.
.

   Other details now observed are different geometric security patterns for the signature field. As of January 2020, three different security designs have been observed:
      • the circle, square & diamond design has only been seen on the 25 cent intaglio note
      • the crescent, wedge & line as well as
      • the cross designs appear on various denominations of lithographed notes
   Also take note that with the cross style security field, there is an unprinted area conforming around the signature to help it stand out. This "buffer zone" is not evident on the crescent & line design.
.
.
.



 





   Furthermore, examining the various notes, it appears that:
  • the crescent, wedge and line pattern is associated with those notes bearing a Roman "GOOD UNTIL USED" and Agency numeral back .75;
  • while the cross pattern is associated with the Lucinda "GOOD UNTIL USED" and Banknote Roman numeral back .75
.
 
   So, to recapitulate: the
  • (sans-serif) Optima GOOD UNTIL USED on the face is seen with the (serif) Bank Roman numerals on the back, with cross security pattern
    .
  • (serif) Roman GOOD UNTIL USED on the face is seen with the (sans-serif) Agency numerals on back, and crescent wedge & line security pattern
    .
  • notes without GOOD UNTIL USED have been observed on the following combinations:
    • the intaglio with circle, square & diamond security pattern with guilloche back, 
    • litho with crescent, wedge & line security pattern and guilloche back;
.
   The following is graphic representation of the design differences:
.

.
.

   
Security Underprinting for the Paper

   Other than the intaglio 25 cent in my collection, all other notes are most definitely lithographed. Lithographed notes are printed on paper that now carries a slightly ultraviolet reactive underprinting of 5 parallel lines with PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY. This appears to have been applied to the paper prior to the printing of the main design. This security mark is seen in both vertical and horizontal directions, depending on the issue. I hesitate from calling it a watermark as it is not viewable through the paper, but on it.

   This security underprinting can be seen on both the face and the back of the note; but it is reversed on the face (meaning it appears as if a mirror image on the face). The underprinting is seen with more ease on the back of the note, due to the large unprinted areas. It is almost exclusively seen in horizontal orientation, but vertical formatting is known. I have recreated the security underprint and darkened it for review:
.
Security underprinting for lithographed TS Series 1935, 1951 and 1960 notes:
(as it appears on the face of the note) (as it appears on the back of the note)
.

..
Overstamped / Overtyped / Perforated Issues

   Another interesting variety of, and seen on scrip; are those issues that have been either typed upon or overstamped with an operator name; or in some cases perforated for a specific user. These were in all likelihood; done so an employee of a trucking or bus firm did not use company issued scrip for their personal use in their private automobile.

   Judging from the crudity and different fonts used in the various stamps, it appears that in the cases of trucking and bus companies the company themselves applied their overstamp to each issue, not the issuing agency (TBTA or PANYNJ).

   In the case of military overstamps or perforations, this would also apply so a service member could not use government issued scrip for personal use; but even more so, it is known when tolls were first collected, military vehicles (as well as vehicles of Police and Fire Departments) passed through the toll barriers free on charge. So, the "U. S." perforation seen on issues may have been a way to account internally within the agency for some of those "no charge" issues.

Somehow, I just don't see this happening at the George Washington Bridge! What I want to know, is how many axles that tank constitutes..


    Seriously though, not all vehicles used in military service wore olive drab or navy gray and a lot of regular production black sedans were used by officials in the course of their duties.
And at this time, I am uncertain if the issuing agency did the perforating or the military.
.

.
.The Back Design Differences - My Thoughts:
.
   While I have no evidence to support my next hypothesis at this time; other than my personal experience in typesetting, letterpress and graphic design, I believe the different designs reflect different order / reorder periods: the more ornate guilloche back was the first order, with the Bank Roman following; and the Agency following third. The lime green "modern" issues came fourth followed by subsequent graphic designs noted by date in the printing code.

   My reasoning for this is the evolution of styles of fonts in typography.

   Ornate style banknotes were common place turn of the century, but as newer font styles and legibility became in vogue, they gained favor. The Agency font was popular in the '50s and '60's, while Bank Roman was popular in the '30's and '40's. Use of guilloches on coupons and paper money held over into the first half of the 20th Century from the 19th Century. In comparison, Times Roman was popular for newsprint and mostly remains so, but Helvetica and Arial are most popular now for documentation. A simpler comparison would be why cursive (script) writing no longer receives an emphasis in handwriting skills taught in school.

   This being said; the guilloche back note were the first order for 1935 issue. When those notes and books were close to being used up, a reorder took place perhaps around mid 1940's when the Banknote Roman font numerals were used. Come the 1950's, due to both attrition and growing use of the automobile,
yet another reorder takes place, this time with the Agency font numerals on back. By 1969, the multicolored "modern issues" are designed and printed with that era's emphasis on graphics (the Statue of Liberty, etc).

   We will never know for sure until the opportunity presents itself to review the orders for scrip in either the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey archives (if they were not destroyed in WTC collapse) or with Rand McNally printers proofs and business records.


   Again this is strictly conjecture and only my hypothesis.
So, now with all this technical mumbo jumbo covered, let us look at the different notes, in order of denomination, and date.
.

Index to PNYA and PANYNJ Issues of Scrip:
.
Port of New York Authority (PNYA) Scrip & Commutation Issues - 1935 to 1972:

Port of New York Authority "original design"
TS1, TS2, TS3, TS4, TS5, TS6?, TS7
F-4, H-3, H-4, H-5, P

1935, 1951, 1960, 1969
Port of New York Authority "new design"
TS4, TS5?, TS6?, TS7
H-4,
1969 - 1972

.

Port of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) Scrip & Commutation Issues: 1972 - 2012

"First" Series Scrip
1972 - ca. 1976
"Second" Series Scrip
ca. 1976 - ca. 1986
"Third" Series Scrip
ca. 1986 - ca. 1993
"Fourth" Series Scrip
ca. 1993 - 2012 .
"Universal" Commuter
ca. 1991 - 2012


.


Port of New York Authority Scrip & Commutation Book Issues - Original Design
TS Series 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6?, 7 - 1935, 1951, 1960, 1969


25 cents
PNYA - Series TS1 - 1935 - 25 cents
guilloché back - intaglio
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
.
.
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
J. E. Ramsey, General Manager
unknown - Rand McNally?
purple
purple
no serial number prefix, serial number and series in red ink,
intaglio printing on white light cardstock
at any of the following "Interstate Crossings"
Lincoln Tunnel not listed,
no "GOOD UNTIL USED" 
intaglio, frame w/ guilloché
circles, squares & diamonds
none
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.010" (thickness)
.

.
existence currently undetermined
PNYA - Series TS1 - 1935 - 25 cents
Optima GOOD UNTIL USED; frame back with Banknote Roman numerals - lithograph
.

.
PNYA - Series TS1 - 1960 - 25 cents
frame back, Agency square block numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
.
.
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:
size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally & Company; New York and Chicago
lavender 
blue

prefix and serial number in red ink,
lithographic printing, beige paper
"INTERSTATE CROSSINGS" replaced with
"AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING"
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Agency square block numerals 
crescent, wedge and line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in horizontal format

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.010" (thickness)
.


.
50 cents
PNYA - Series TS2 - 1935 - 50 cents
guilloché back - lithograph?
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
.
.
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally & Company; New York and Chicago
blue 
blue

prefix and serial number in red ink
"Interstate Crossings" removed, "Lincoln Tunnel" added,
series in main body color,
no "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ guilloché 
crescent & line
none

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) (thickness unknown)
.

.
.
PNYA - Series TS2 - 1935 - 50 cents
frame back with Banknote Roman numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
.
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:
size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
face: blue
back: blue

prefix and serial number in red ink, 
series in face main body color
Optima (sans-serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Bankers Roman font numerals

cross
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in vertical format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA - Series TS2 - 1935 - 50 cents
frame back, Agency square block numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally & Company, New York and Chicago
face: blue
back: blue
 
prefix and serial number in red ink, series in main body color,
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Agency font numerals
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in horizontal format

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA - Series TS2 - 1935 - 50 cents
overstamp on back: "Associated Transport, Inc"
(Associated Transport was a trucking firm)
collection of George S. Cuhaj
same as regular issue above
.

.
PNYA - Series TS2 - 1935 - 50 cents
overprint on face "FOR USE OF U.S. NAVY VEHICLE ONLY"
empty frame - no .50 denomination of back of note
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally & Company, New York and Chicago
face: blue
back: blue
 
prefix and serial number in red ink, series in main body color,
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame only - no numerals
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in horizontal format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.


.
75 cents
existence currently undetermined
PNYA - Series TS3 - 1935 (75 cents)
frame back with guilloche - intaglio or lithograph 
.

.
PNYA - Series TS3 - 1935 - 75 cents
frame back, Banknote Roman numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
.
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
face: green 
back: blue

prefix and serial number in red ink, 
series in face main body color
Optima (sans-serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Bankers Roman font numerals

cross
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in vertical format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
With the acquisition of the above note, it was also observed to have a different security field.
The upper note - Banknote Roman numeral font back has a cross style security field,
while the note with the Agency numeral font back (below) has a crescent, wedge & line security field.
It also appears the signature field on the above note is slightly narrower.
Also noted was a slightly different facsimile signature of Austin J. Tobin (note the A and T).
                                    crescent, wedge and line security field   cross security field                                          
.

.
PNYA - Series TS3 - 1935 - 75 cents
frame back, Agency square block sans-serif numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
.
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
green 
blue

prefix and serial number in red ink
serial number in red, series in face main body color,
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Agency font numerals

crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in horizontal format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.


.
$1.00
PNYA - Series TS4 - 1935 - $1.00
guilloché back, lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
orange-red 
orange-red
prefix and serial number in red ink,
No "GOOD UNTIL USED" printing on left edge
frame w/ ornate guilloché on back
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in horizontal format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - unknown
.

.
same design as 75 cent and $1.50 note
with
sans-serif "GOOD UNTIL USED" and
crosses security field for signature area

PNYA - Series TS4 - 1935 - $1.00
frame back, Banknote Roman serif numerals - lithograph
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
unknown
orange-red 
blue
prefix and serial number in red ink,
Optima (sans-serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Bankers Roman numerals
unknown - believed to be crosses
unknown
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - unknown
.

.
PNYA - Series TS4 - 1935 - $1.00
frame back, Agency square block sans-serif numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:

notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
orange-red 
blue
prefix and serial number in red ink
series in face main body color,
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
frame w/ Agency square block numbers
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in horizontal format
size:  3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA - Series TS4 - 1935 - $1.00
perforated: "U S " (presumably government issue)
frame back, Agency square block sans-serif numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:

notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
orange-red 
blue
prefix and serial number in red ink
series in face main body color
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"

square block numbers on back
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority in vertical format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.


.
$1.50

PNYA - Series TS5 - 1951 - $1.50 dollar
guilloché back - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
maroon
maroon
no prefix, serial number in red ink
no "GOOD UNTIL USED" 
guilloché back
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority horizontal format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - unknown
.

.
same design as 75 & 1.00 cent note
with
sans-serif "GOOD UNTIL USED" and

crosses security field for signature area
PNYA - Series TS5 - 1935 - $1.50 dollar
frame back w/ Banknote Roman serif numerals - lithograph?
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:
notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
unknown
orange-red
blue
prefix and serial number in red ink
Optima (sans-serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"
Bank Roman numerals on back.
unknown - believed to be crosses
unknown
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - unknown
.

.
PNYA - Series TS5 - 1951 - $1.50
frame back, Agency square block sans-serif numerals - lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes, face:

notes, back:
security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
Rand McNally
maroon 
blue
prefix and serial number in red ink
series in face main body color,
Roman (serif) "GOOD UNTIL USED"

square block numbers on back
crescent, wedge & line
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority horizontal format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.


.
Port of New York Authority "original design" - Commutation Books & Passes

   In addition to the TS Series 1-2-3-4-5 scrip above, we know of other series issues at this time: F-4, H-3, H-4, H-5, and P.  

   For some issues, scrip was available in books of 10 scrip valid for one year or books of 20 scrip (or more) valid for two years or 30 days. Where commuter tickets differ from toll scrip, is toll scrip was good until used (no expiration date) whereas commutation scrip had an expiration date. In short, a commutation book contains a supply of scrip, usually only good for a set period of time, and offered at a discount below the singular one way or round trip toll. This made it convenient for the commuter who drove to work on average 20 business day per month and who was almost certainly going to use all the scrip in that period of time.

   The Series H-3, H-4 and to some degree the H-5 are understood to be Commutation Scrip for Passenger Automobiles.


   At the current time, it appears H-3 was good for 2 years, H-4 was good for 30 days and H-5 was good for 1 year.
Those issues with longevity over 30 days was good for delivery drivers who may not need the benefit or quantity of a monthly commuter scrip. 

   Series F-4 is an issue for Motor Trucks, 2 axles, up to and including 2 ton capacity, good for two years.
It has punch boxes for the twelve months and years 1934 and 1935 (much like a railroad conductors ticket). This issue was printed by International Ticket Company, Newark, NJ. Strangely, this issue is only good for Goethals, Outerbridge and Bayonne Bridges. As the Verrazano was not yet to be built for 30 more years, this issue may very well be considered the first Staten Island issue. Also, if I am deducing correctly, the red outline numeral 5 denotes this is from a $5 book of scrip.

   I came to this conclusion by looking at the 
Series H-4 (1965) 40 trip / $10 - 30 day commutation and the Series H-5 1969 # of trips unknown / $10, both of which have a red outlined 10. The question remains how many scrip were in the book. Also of particular note to the F-4 series, is the different security underprinting: wavy lines with National Security Ticket logo, in vertical orientation.

   It is presumed but unconfirmed, that the F series books were available for all truck classes: two axles up to 2 ton; two axle 2-5 tons; two axle, over 5 tons; three axle and four axle; but at this time we can only confirm the F-4.


   Series P is an Employees Personal Pass. Non-transferable, and must show proper photo identification. 
Printed by Rand McNally.



.
PNYA Series F-4 - 1934/1935
Motor Truck, 2 Axles, up to and including 2 tons
- Staten Island Crossings only
lithography
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:
.
security underprinting:
size:
none
International Ticket Co, Newark, NJ
black
none
none
coupon number in red, book value? class number? in red outline,
12 months, two year punch tabs along bottom

wavy lines with National Security Ticket logo, vertical  format
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA Series H-3 - 1942/1943
26 trip / $6 - 2 year commutation - Staten Island Crossings only
lithograph
(collection of MTA Archives)
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:

.

security underprinting:
size:
none
International Ticket Co, Newark, NJ
black
none
red ink,
class number, coupon number in red outline
12 months, two year punch tabs along bottom, 31 day punch tabs on right
blank back,
wavy lines with National Security Ticket logo, vertical  format
unknown
.

.
PNYA Series H-4 (1965)
40 trip / $10 - 30 day commutation - Hudson River Crossings only
lithograph
George S. Cuhaj collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:

.

security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark

size:
Austin J. Tobin
Rand McNally & Company, New York & Chicago
green
none
no prefix, red ink
30 day commutation - 40 trips, $10
coupon number in red, serial number with no prefix in red,

blank back,
crosshatch
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority horizontal format

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA Series H-4 (1965)
40 trip / $10 - 30 day commutation - all crossings 
lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number
notes:
.


security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark

size:
Austin J. Tobin
Rand McNally
black
blue frame only
prefix and serial number in red ink on notes, prefix black ink of cover
30 day commutation - 40 trips, $10
coupon number in red, book value in red outline, unprinted area for serial number, empty frame on back
book cover white

crosshatch
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority horizontal format

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.

booklet cover only

booklet cover only
PNYA Series H-5 - 1967
25 trip / $10 
lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:
.

security underprinting:
size:
Austin J. Tobin
unknown
black
blue
prefix in cover color, serial number and year in red ink
25 trips, $10
coupon number in red, serial number with prefix in red
book cover blue
unknown

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA Series H-5 - 1969 
# of trips unknown (25?) / $10 
lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:


security underprinting, signature field:
security printing, paper / watermark

size
Austin J. Tobin
Rand McNally
dark blue 
blue frame only
prefix and serial number in red ink
coupon number, serial number with prefix and book denomination in red,
empty frame on back
book cover blue - good until December 31, 1961

crosshatch
alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority horizontal format

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA Employee's Personal Pass (1964) 
lithograph
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:

security underprinting:

size:
PA form:
Austin J. Tobin
Rand McNally

dark blue 
no printing
prefix in black, serial number in red ink
coupon number in red, blank back
black
form number on face cover:

alternating 5 lines with Port of New York Authority horizontal format

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
PA-378 / 10-64

.

.
.TABLE OF CONTENTS


PNYA Scrip & Commutations Books - the "new design" 
.
   In 1969, PNYA toll scrip was redesigned and released, presumably to reflect a more modern image and to incorporate new security and accounting features.

   This new design veered away from the "stock certificate" look with ornate border of the original design; and now carried an overexposed (for lack of a better term) styled silhouette image of the head of the Statue of Liberty on the left side. The main body of the note is printed in lime green with light blue security underprinting "PORT ON NEW YORK AUTHORITY". A large 
11/16
" 1.00 or 3.00 in blue is also carried on the face for easier denominational identification. The font is now an easier to read sans-serif Helvetica style.    

   In keeping with its predecessors, these issues retained the TS code to denote denominations: TS4 ($1.00) and a new TS7 for $3.00.
It is unknown at this time, if a TS6 issue in either 2.00 or 2.25 denominations, and if the printing of TS5 ($1.50) was included in the new design, and if higher denominations than $3.00 were printed. It is presumed so.

   On the TS4-1969 (1.00 denomination), a 3/4" wide unprinted white area on the left side of the scrip was reserved for the serial number and the Series number: 04 = TS4, 07 = TS7, etc.
.

.
Optical Character Recognition

   On this new design of scrip, both the series and serial number are now printed in Optical Character Recognition - A font (shortened to OCR-A) and in black ink.


   "Many of the typefaces used today are derived from medieval calligraphy, only slightly modified by the limitations of early printing technologies (wood blocks and movable type). To imitate fine penmanship, vertical strokes are thick compared to horizontal strokes, and NW-SE diagonals are thicker than NE-SW diagonals. 

   Therefore curved strokes may vary in width according to their local orientation. In contrast, typefaces specifically designed for accurate OCR, such as OCR-A and OCR-B fonts, have uniform stroke widths and exaggerated distinctions between similar symbols such as Ο and 0 or 1 and l:

1234567890
OCR-A font

   OCR-A wasn’t the first font to tackle these machine-scanning issues, but it was a major step forward in that it was a complete alphabet that was readable by both machines and humans. Previously, the most well-known use for such technology involved something you’re probably familiar with if you’ve cashed a check sometime in the last 60 years: Magnetic Ink Character Recognition, or MICR:"


MICR E13-B font - used in North America

   OCR-A, which you might have seen on a piece of junk mail or two over the years, expanded on the basic idea of MICR by creating a character set that could be detected by either a computer or a set of eyes. The problem was, however, that it was a better fit for computers and had a strongly stylized design, which some found not so appealing."

Typography - History of Optical Character Recognition"; Tedium by Ernie Smith, March 22, 2017:


   
.
   
While Optical Character Recognition programming is common today on modern computers and image scanner programs, its history can be traced back to being first developed in 1912 by Emanuel Goldberg, as an aid for reading for the visually impaired.

   By 1966, OCR programs evolved to the degree to be adopted for widespread use by the US Post Office for letter sorting.
The actual font (OCR-A) was developed from MICR font by none other than Adrian Frutiger, who is a world renowned designer of typeface designer).

   As for the OCR-A font itself, (which can be read by that article above), the font was a further developmental step from, and similar to the MICR E13B font your routing number and account number are printed in, which can be seen on the bottom of your checks from your local bank.

   As for the technical aspects of MICR, each character is magnetically readable due to the composition of the ink and the unique shape or "magnetic fingerprint" each numeral has and not by the optical appearance, although by incorporating the magnetic signal into an optically recognizable Arabic numeral; aids in readability.


   The trial of MICR E13B font was shown to the American Bankers Association in July 1956, which adopted it in 1958 as the MICR standard for negotiable documents in the United States. The ABA adopted MICR as its standard because machines could read MICR accurately, and MICR could be printed using existing technology. In addition, MICR remained machine readable, even when overstamped, marked, and minor mutilation. The first checks using MICR were printed by the end of 1959. Although compliance with MICR standards was voluntary in the United States, it had been almost universally adopted in the United States by 1963.


   And as we have seen; this new PNYA issue of scrip was released in 1969. It should be noted:

  • MICR readers don’t "see" the characters optically; only the amount of magnetic signal present in a vertical line at any given point; and
  • the odd print styles of MICR fonts are designed to give each character a distinctive signal shape.
    whereas:
  • OCR-A readers are strictly optical.
   .
   
With the evolution of computer programming and optics, the "mechanical" appearance of the OCR-A font has evolved to being usable with most sans-serif fonts.

   Another interesting feature accompanying the OCR-A font and seen on this new design, is the 1/2" 90 degree right angle device. I
ts actual purpose currently unconfirmed, but I believe it to be for optical reader for serial number printing area; as it is only seen on this design issue of scrip utilizing the OCR-A characters. This "angle device" appears regardless of whether the serial number is printed on the left or right hand side of the notes; nor is this "angle device" seen on any previous or subsequent issues with other types of serial numbering. It is therefore possible it is a "check digit" or "check character" for the OCR readers.

   Returning to new design of the scrip, a change is seen on the TS7-1970 (3.00 denomination), with the unprinted area is on the right, yet with same OCR-A font for series and serial number.

   On the back of the note,
in bronze ink; a simple large 11/16" block style 1.00 graces the note; as well as the Port of New York Authority seal repeating as a security underprinting.

   A variety encountered, is TS4 - 1969 scrip perforated with the letters "US" (I only have the "US" perforated variety, I need an unperforated regular issue). It is believed, but as yet unconfirmed that these were issues to US governmental agencies and / or the military. This US perforation is seen in a earlier issue of scrip at well: Series TS4 - 1935:


PNYA "new design" Toll Scrip - 1969-1972
PNYA Series TS4 - 1969 - $1.00 
perforated "U S " (presumably government issue)
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
.

security underprinting, face:

security underprinting, back:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
bronze

black serial number and series number in black OCR-A font in
unprinted margin on left,

sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating "PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
repeating emblem / seal of Port of New York Authority and
"PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA Series TS7 - 1970 - $3.00
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
.

security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
gold security underprint with large numeral
s
serial number and series number in black OCR-A font
unprinted margin on right,

sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating "PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
repeating emblem / seal of Port of New York Authority and
"PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PNYA Series TS7 - 1970 - $3.00
overstamp "FOR USE / TRANSCON LINES / ONLY"
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:

.

security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
gold security underprint with large numerals

serial number and series number in black OCR-A font
unprinted margin on right,
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.

blue overstamp: FOR USE TRANSCON LINES ONLY"
repeating "PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
repeating emblem / seal of Port of New York Authority and
"PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
Transcon was originally founded 1946 in California as a local shipper. With the opening of the Eisenhower Interstate System across the United States, Transcon grew rapidly into the long distance / over the road trucking field through acquisitions starting in 1950. /The company enjoyed immense success 1980 following ICC deregulation. By 1990 Transcon was losing about $5 million a month, and sold to Growth Financial Corporation in April 1990 for a token $12. A detailed history of Transcon Lines may be read here: Transcon History - US1  Industries.

Is is presumed Transcon purchased toll scrip in bulk, (possibly, but not likely at a small discount); and either they or the Port New York Authority overstamped their script for their use only when redeeming at the Port Authority crossings to prevent unauthorized use.
.
..

.
PNYA "new design" Commutation Books - 1969-1972
PNYA Series H-4 - February 1972
30 day, 20 ticket, $10
lithograph
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
.
notes:
.

security underprinting:
size:
Austin J. Tobin
unknown
green with white head of Statue of Liberty

security underprinting
coupon: OCR-A
cover: prefix 1, large sans-serif serial number
25 trips, $10
coupon number in red, serial number with prefix in red
book cover green
PNYA seal on back of ticket

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.

PNYA "new design" - Employee's Personal Pass
PNYA Employees Personal Pass - ca. 1969 to 1972
Note this design carries the same design (silhouette view of Liberty Island and NY harbor)
as the 
PANYNJ First Issue Series H-5 Commutation Book Cover - 1977
OCR-A font serial number
PA 378-69

collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
Austin J. Tobin, Executive Director
unknown

red 
silhouette view of Liberty Island and NY harbor, numerals red
bronze 

serial number in black OCR-A font, in unprinted margin on right,

sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.

repeating "PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
repeating emblem / seal of Port of New York Authority
and
"PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY"
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Scrip



   It is here where I would appreciate all assistance and input. Scrip examples and information are severely lacking. In some cases, I only have a booklet cover and the stubs inside, but no images of the actual scrip. So, it goes without further elaboration: images and information are greatly appreciated. Your extras for sale are even more so! .   

   Please do not hesitate to contact me either by email at bedt14@aol.com or by telephone at (936) 396-6103.


Please note:
   In consideration of the removal of a series number or issue years from this and subsequent designs, the following scrip issue designs are divided into tentative First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth issues for either Scrip or Commutation Books at this time. This series system is based on changes in general appearance, use of PANYNJ logos and dates of use as either written on the inside front cover, or in the printing codes on the stubs. If information is received from official PANYNJ sources or collectors, that an official series name or number exists, the nomenclature on this website may change.


.
PANYNJ Scrip - First? Issue - ca. 1972 - Series of 1969
.   
   In 1972, the Port of New York Authority was renamed to better reflect its status and partnership concerning the two states, that being of New York AND New Jersey. As a result, new printings of all scrip and commutation books were changed to carry the agency's new identity: The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.


   As such, the lettering and underprinting of the scrip was changed to reflect the new agency name. The color of the back of the scrip was changed to green; and now, the underprinting was a smaller repeating version of the Statue of Liberty (replacing the PNYA seal) as well as the small words "Port Authority of New York and New Jersey" of face and back.


PANYNJ First? Issue - Series TS4 - 1969 - $1.00
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black OCR-A font, in unprinted margin on right,
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.
.
   Until now, all notes seen had fit neatly into either the final 1969 and 1970 Series of PNYA scrip above or the issues of PANYNJ below.

   But the appearance of the $1.00 scrip directly above now presents a quandary. It clearly says Port of New York and New Jersey, and front and back designs match those in those series illustrated below. However, it still retains the designation Series TS4 - 1969 in the upper left, and it has an OCR-A series number (04), serial number and 90 degree registration angle as with the final Port of New York Authority series from the previous designs, as seen on notes in the chapter prior to this.
   
   However the unprinted area for the serial number is on the right
which conforms to following PANYNJ issues (instead of left as with those previous PNYA issues).

   It is unknown if there are other denominations conforming to the above design, or if only the $1.00 note appeared like this, with the $1.50 and higher denominations falling into below designs , which would in actuality make them part of the First Issue. Until more information surfaces or other notes appear, I will keep the designs separated by issue.

   Therefore, the appearance of this above note now has to be designated PANYNJ First Issue, and those issue numbers of notes listed below have been advanced by one (First becoming Second, Second becoming Third, etc).

   All subsequent PANYNJ issues 
appear to forgo the use of the Series TS designation. Denominations in my collection are $2.25, $3.00 and $6.00. Serial numbers remain in the unprinted area on right, but are now in a larger easier to read sans-serif number font.    

   The serial number is no longer in OCR-A font, and appears to a standard sans-serif numbering font (but still can be optically recognized) applied via automatic letterpress numbering crash numbering machines.

   There is one variety worth noting: on the $6.00 issue, there is seen a serial number without prefix, and one with a double zero (00) prefix. The purpose or meaning of this 00 prefix is unknown at this time.

   Also, on notes higher than 9,999,999, the numeral 1 for the 10 million designation appears to have been printed in a separate process from the rest of the serial number; perhaps even at the time of the application of the black ink process for the main design. Also seen is a double zero, 00 prefix.

   This size of the scrip remains as with all previous issues:
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)




PANYNJ First? Issue - Employees Personal Passes
PANYNJ First? Issue - Employee's Personal Pass (unknown year - post 1972) - Variety 1 (red 12)
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors:

serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
.
size:
PA form:
none
unknown
face: red silhouette view of Liberty Island and NY harbor
back: gold security underprinting

black ink sans-serif font in unprinted margin on right
red sans-serif number "12" in upper left corner of face.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
repeating Statue of Liberty and
PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
378-69
.

.
PANYNJ First? Issue - Employee's Personal Pass (unknown year - post 1972) - Variety 2 (black 12)
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
.
size:
PA form:
none
unknown
red silhouette view of Liberty Island and NY harbor
light gold security underprinting
black ink sans-serif font in unprinted margin on right
black sans-serif number "12" in upper left corner of face.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" 
repeating Statue of Liberty and
PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
378-69
.



PANYNJ Scrip - Second? Issue - ca. 1976?
.
   With this design, the "TS Series" and year and the OCR-A serial number font no longer used.

PANYNJ Second? Issue - $1.50
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black sans-serif in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
PANYNJ Second? Issue - $2.00
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
.

security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black sans-serif in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.

1 prefix (greater than 10,000,000) out of register
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"  repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - $2.00
with overstamp for Domenico Bus Service
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
.

security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black sans-serif in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
1 prefix, overstamp for Domenico Bus Service
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"  repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - $2.25
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
notes:
.
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black sans-serif in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
repeating
emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - $3.00
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

.
size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black sans-serif in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
repeating
emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - $6.00
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
 lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

black sans-serif in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.

PANYNJ Second? Issue - $6.00
with 00 serial number prefix
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:

notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
medium green security underprint with large numerals

00 prefix (preprinted?) - unusual font for serial number
black ink sans-serif font in unprinted margin on right
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS



.



PANYNJ Scrip - Third Issue - ca. 1986

   With this series, and by reviewing the scrip examples in my collection; we can see the next set of design changes. The overall design of the note remains unchanged save for the following few details:
  • the unprinted white area for the serial number is now removed and the face design extended to the border. 
  • the serial number is now simply overprinted on the design at the lower left corner and appears to be in a magenta colored ink.
  • the newest logo of the PANYNJ: is inserted at at the top right of the face
  • and the vignette of the Statue of Liberty now includes more of her shoulder area to accommodate an unprinted white area for the serial number.

   It is unknown at this time what other denominations exist, but several more are likely.

PANYNJ Third? Issue - $4.50
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
green, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
olive

black ink in lower left corner
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.

S. C. 86 on upper left corner of face; 86 = date?
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"  repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on back

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
PANYNJ Third? Issue - $4.50
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
beige, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
olive

magenta ink in lower left corner
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.

repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"  repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on back

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Third? Issue - $7.50
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back
serial number
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
lavender, white head of Statue of Liberty, blue numerals
olive

magenta ink in lower left corner
sans-serif denomination numbers on face and back.

repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"  repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on back

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.


PANYNJ Scrip - Fourth? Issue - ca. 1993

   Quite frankly, I do not know if this issue is the last issue printed before becoming obsolete what with the advent of E-ZPass, or if in fact another series is lurking about undocumented. I hope time will tell.    

   At the expense of sounding like a broken record, you are cordially invited to share images of your collection or information, additions or corrections
. Please contact me by email at bedt14@aol.com or by telephone at (936) 396-6103.

   
And yet we can observe another design change!  The new "seagull" logo of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is included at top right.   

   The unprinted area at the bottom for the serial number is removed and the design expanded to cover the entire face of the note. The serial number, now enlarged to 7/32" for easier legibility and in a serif font.


.
PANYNJ Fourth? Issue - 1993 - $4.00 scrip
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:

.
size:
printing code:
PA form:
none
unknown
lime green, white head of statue of Liberty solid blue numerals
unprinted plain white

enlarged serial number in Courier style serif font on bottom,
seagull logo
repeating
"THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" in blue on face only. Ultraviolet barcode on right edge
4 1/4" (width) - 2 3/16" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
06-0004-1200
PA-S-4-2/93
PA3516A 2/93
.

.
(PANYNJ PANYNJ Fourth? Issue - 1993 - $8.00 scrip
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
.

size:
printing code:
PA form:
none
unknown
pink, white head of statue of Liberty solid blue numerals
unprinted plain white

enlarged serial number in Courier style serif font on bottom,
seagull logo
repeating
"THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" in blue on face only. Ultraviolet barcode on right edge
4 1/4" (width) - 2 3/16" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
06-008-1200
PA-S-8-2/93
PA3516A 2/93
.

.


PANYNJ Commutation Tickets & Books - Second? Issue

   As with the earlier commutation books, these were books of tickets with no denomination; but were only valid for a limited amount of time, whereas the denominational scrip issues were good until used.

   H-4 books were valid for 30 days, and contained 20 tickets. H-5 Books were good for a year, but only contained 12 tickets.

PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-4 - October 1973
30 day, 20 ticket, $10
large font serial number with 003 serial number prefix
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors:

serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
size:
none
unknown
face: purple, white head of Statue of Liberty
back: purple

003 prefix, black ink

unknown
unknown
3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-4 - June 1975
30 day, 20 ticket, $10
small condensed sans-serif font serial number - no prefix
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
.
size:
none
unknown
purple, white head of Statue of Liberty
purple

black ink sans-serif condensed font in unprinted margin on right
(serial number on left on cover)
repeating PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on face, repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on back

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-4 - February 1977
30 day, 20 ticket, $20.00

roman font serial number 
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
size:
none
unknown
red, white head of Statue of Liberty
red

black ink, roman font



3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.

PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-4 October 1979
30 day, 20 ticket, $20.00

sans-serif font serial number 
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
red, white head of Statue of Liberty
red

black ink, sans-serif font

repeating 
PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on face repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" on back

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-4 - March 29 / April 29, 1980
30 day, 20 ticket, $20.00

roman font serial number on book cover, sans-serif serial number on tickets
This issue raises at least one question. With the serial number cover on the book different from the tickets, were there two separately contracted printing firms?
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:

size:
none
unknown
blue, white head of Statue of Liberty
blue

black ink, roman font on cover, black ink sans-serif font on tickets

repeating 
PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"
repeating emblem of Statue of Liberty and
"PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY"

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-5 - 1976
12 ticket, $9.60, 1 year?

large font serial number with 002 serial number prefix
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:

serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
size:
none
unknown
purple silhouette view of Liberty Island and NY harbor
back: unknown

002 prefix, black ink sans-serif font

white binding
unknown



3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series H-5 - 1977
12 ticket, $9.60, 1 year?

large font serial number with 002 serial number prefix

authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:

serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
size:
none
Osceola Graphics
purple silhouette view of Liberty Island and NY harbor)
unknown

002 prefix, black ink, sans-serif font

white binding
.
.
unknown

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
.
Carpool Commutation Books

   As learned from a Federal Highway Administration report on "Valuation of Priority Treatment for High Occupancy Vehicles, Final Report - January 1981", the Carpool Ticket book was introduced in 1975; the following is now known;

TOLL PRICING
New York City, NY

Project Description:

Reduced tolls for 3+ carpools during peak periods were instituted on six river crossings from New Jersey to New York. The carpool tolls were introduced in April 1975 at the same time tolls were increased for other modes. The carpool rate is half the rate of a standard commuter ticket. 

Project Location:

The six (6) river crossings are the Outerbridge Crossing, Goethals Bridge, Bayonne Bridge, George Washington Bridge, and the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels.

Project Characteristics:

On April 10, 1975, the toll schedule for the NY-NJ river crossings was increased by 50 percent for all classes of vehicles except buses. At the same time, an existing 50 percent commuter discount ticket and a 20 percent two-year discount ticket were abolished. A special weekday transferable carpool ticket was made available for 3+ carpools. This carpool ticket, good for six months, represented a 66 2/3 percent discount over the new cash fare and equivalent to the price of a commuter ticket before the toll increase. 

On April 21, 1975, the twenty trip, thirty-day commuter discount ticket was reinstated, except at a 33 1/3 percent discount level rather than at the previous 50 percent level. This toll schedule took effect on May 5, 1975, and is summarized as follows:

Prior to 5/5/75  Effective 5/5/75
Automobile: cash price $1.00 $1.50
Thirty day Commuter Ticket .50 $1.00
Two-Year Ticket .80 n/a
Carpool Ticket n/a .50
Bus: $2.00 $2.00 
Trucks: $1.00-$4.00 $1.50-$6.00

Project Impacts:

   Carpool ticket use increased from 400 during the first week of the project to almost 4000 one month later as existing commuters and carpools became familiar with the new ticket. This represents approximately 2 percent of all peak period vehicular crossings and 5 percent of all person crossings.

   However, the carpool discount had a minimal effect on the actual formation of new 3+ carpools. Negligible changes in vehicular occupancies supports this finding. An examination of commuter travel modes in the NYC area helps to explain this situation. Of the total morning peak period travelers (195,000 total crossing the river), 65 percent use mass transit, and over 90 percent of these trips are destined to the Central Business District. On the other hand, less than 40 percent of total peak period automobile trips are destined to the Central Business District. Thus, about 85 percent of the trans-Hudson person trips to the Central Business District in the peak period are by transit and only 15 percent by auto. For Central Business District work trips-only the auto percentage is even lower. This must be placed into the perspective that the average one-way trans-Hudson auto commuter trip is over 30 miles.

.

.
PANYNJ Second? Issue - Series CP - Carpool Automobile - June / December 1980
6 month, 60 ticket, $30
collection of George S. Cuhaj
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
notes:
security underprinting, face:
security underprinting, back:
size:
unknown
unknown
face: green, white head of Statue of Liberty
unknown
unknown

unknown

3 ¾" (width) - 2 ⅛" (height) - (thickness unknown)







Commutation Tickets & Books - Third Issue and "Universal Commuter" - ca. 1990


PANYNJ Third? Issue - 1990
30 day, 20 tickets, $40.00 (cover only)
If my understanding is correct, these scrip were cheaper ($40 for 20 tickets - or $2 value each scrip)
BUT were only valid for 30 days.
authors collection
.

.
(under white light) (under ultraviolet light)
unprinted white
PANYNJ "Universal" Issue - 1991
20 ticket, $72.00, commuter book / $4.00 scrip
20 tickets for $72 ($3.60 value each scrip) but were valid indefinitely
authors collection
facsimile signature:
printer:
colors, face:
colors, back:
serial number:
.
notes:
security underprinting, face:
.
security underprinting, back:

size:
printing codes:
PA form:
.
none
unknown
lavender, blue numerals -
unprinted plain white

OCR-A font in black, lower left of tickets, covers are sans-serif bottom right corner
sans-serif outline shaded denomination number on face.

repeating "THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY" in blue on face only. Ultra violet barcode bottom right corner
none
3 15/16" (width) + 3/8" stub - 2 3/16" (height) - 0.005" (thickness)
? 3-B890
? C-93
PA 3521 - 10/91
.

.

   According to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey website, acceptance of Port Authority Scrip & Universal Tickets for toll payments at PANYNJ tunnels and bridges ended on June 30, 2012.


   While they offer a refund program and you
may return your Port Authority Scrip and Universal tickets to the PANYNJ for a full refund of the price paid, keeping in mind the monetary value of these tickets is 10 percent less than their face value; i.e.: a ticket with a $4 face value is redeemed at $3.60.

However! I am willing to significantly pay more than face value to add needed examples and issues,
including complete, partial books or empty book covers to my collection.

How much I will pay depends on several factors:
* whether I have the issue or not (and even if I have issues, I may need extras for trade)
* how many of each example you have
* the overall condition they are in, and
* whether they are loose, still attached in either a partial or full book, or if you have book cover only.

Contact me to find out:  bedt14@aol.com  or by telephone at  (936) 396-6103.


.

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

.
Serial Number Prefixes & Designs Observed for PNYA & PANYNJ Scrip & Commutation Books
.
   The following is a chart of observed or lack of prefix letters, with serif, sans-serif or lack of "GOOD UNTIL USED"; and security field designs;
for the TS1 - 5, 1935-1969 as well as other Series of Port of New York Authority Toll Scrip.

If you have an issue with a letter prefix not listed, you are invited to contact me to add it here
: bedt14@aol.com or  (936) 396-6103.
.
Scrip
denom series year notes n/p A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y    Z printer

.25

TS1 1935 intaglio, guilloché back, no s/n prefix
does not have Lincoln Tunnel
no GOOD UNTIL USED
diamond, circle & square security field
light card stock
n/p - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -    - unknown
.
 
.25

TS11935litho, plain back w/ Banknote Roman numerals: .25
has Lincoln Tunnel,
security field ?
presumed to exist, not yet observed
. .. ...... ...... ... ...
 
.25

TS1 1935 litho, plain back w/ Agency numerals: .25
has Lincoln Tunnel,
crescent, wedge & line security field
presumed to exist, not yet observed
.
 
.25

TS11960litho, frame back w/ Agency numerals: .25
has Lincoln Tunnel,
Roman GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field
 A                        Rand McNally
.

.50

TS2 1935 litho, guilloché back
no GOOD UNTIL USED
F936462 w/ WAR DEPT VEHICLES overtype
F
Rand McNally
.

.50

TS21935litho, guilloché back
no GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field
B
Rand McNally
.
.50TS21935litho, frame back w/ Banknote Roman numerals: .50
Optima GOOD UNTIL USED
cross security field
  H   Rand McNally
.
.50TS21935litho, frame back w/ Agency numerals: .50
Roman GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field
F478379 has Associated Transport o/p
  
CD 
  
K
MN    STU W   Rand McNally
.
.50 TS2 1935 litho, blank frame back 
Roman GOOD UNTIL USED
L206345 w/ typed "FOR USE OF NAVY VEHICLE ONLY"
    L       Rand McNally
.
.75

TS3

1935litho, guilloché back
security field ?
presumed to exist, not yet observed                          
.
.75

TS3

1935litho, frame back w/ Banknote Roman numerals: .75
Optima GOOD UNTIL USED
cross security field
 A                        Rand McNally
.
.75

TS3

1935 litho, frame back w/ Agency numerals: .75
Roman GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field
                                                Y   Rand McNally
.

1.00

TS41935litho, guilloché back: 1 DOLLAR
no GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field

LRand McNally
.

1.00

TS4 1935 litho, frame back w/ Banknote Roman numerals: 1.00
Optima GOOD UNTIL USED
security field ?
A Rand McNally
.

1.00

TS4 1935 litho, frame back w/ Agency numerals:  I.00
Roman GOOD UNTIL USED
*R898182 perfed "US"
A           G       K       O P   R*       V         Rand McNally
.

1.00

TS4 1969 Statue of Liberty design,
MICR E13-B font for series s/n on left side
n/p                                                     unknown
.

1.50

TS51951litho, guilloché back: 1 50/100 DOLLARS
no GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field
n/pRand McNally
.

1.50

TS5 1951 litho, frame back w/ Banknote Roman numerals: 1.50
Optima GOOD UNTIL USED
security field ? 
X Rand McNally
.

1.50

TS5 1951 litho, frame back w/ square numerals: I.00
Roman GOOD UNTIL USED
crescent, wedge & line security field
                                          U   W       Rand McNally
.
1.75?
2.00?
2.25? 2.50?
TS61969?
1970?
presumed to exist, not yet observed
.
3.00 TS7 1970 Statue of Liberty design,
"check" style font for series and s/n on right side
overprinting seen for Transcon trucking line
n/p unknown
..
Commutation Tickets & Books
H3 1942/
1943
Passenger Auto
good until December 31, 1943
Goethals, Outerbridge or Bayonne Bridges only
s/n 122500
.
H4 1960 Passenger Auto
good until August 20, 1960
s/n C 233167 (empty cover - gsc)
.
H41972Passenger Auto
good until February 17, 1972
s/n 1 828604 (gsc)
.
H5 1969 Passenger Auto
good until December 31, 1969
s/n D 569020 - coupon #7
D Rand McNally
.
H5 1976 Passenger Auto
good until December 31, 1976
s/n 002 057443
unknown
.
H5 1977 Passenger Auto
good until December 31, 1977
s/n 002 221704
unknown
.
F-4 1934/
1935
Motor Truck (2 axles) up to 2 tons
no serial number - coupon #23
Goethals, Outerbridge or Bayonne Bridges only
Int'l Ticket Co
..
P 1964? Employees Personal Pass
P 89098 - coupon #24
form PA-378 10/64
P Rand McNally
 n/p = no prefix
 bold italics
= in my collection

 



authors collection

Known Types of Books - Scrip & Commutation - 1935 to ?



Scrip - PNYA
.
seriesissue datesused forface value
per ticket
actual valuebook qty
"# of trips"
good forbook purchase price
TS2 1935all vehicles 50¢ 45¢ 25 until used$11.25
TS3 1935all vehicles 75¢ 67.5¢ 25 until used$16.88 (?)
TS41935all vehicles$1.0090¢24?until used
TS4 1935all vehicles $1.00 90¢ 25 until used$22.50
TS41969all vehicles$1.00until used
TS5 1951all vehicles $1.50 $1.35 25 until used$33.75
TS7 1970all vehicles $3.00 $2.70 unk until usedunknown
.
Scrip - PANYNJ
.
seriesissue datesused forface value
per ticket
actual valuebook qty
"# of trips"
good forbook purchase price
no date $1.50 unk until used
no date $2.00 unk until used
no date $2.25 unk until used
no date $3.00 unk until used
no date $6.00 unk until used
no date $4.50 unk until used
no date $7.50 unk until used
.
.
Commutation Tickets & Books - PNYA
.
series issue datesused for face value
per ticket
actual value book qty
"# of trips"
good forbook purchase price

1928Passenger Automobile Staten Island Bridges only25¢26?$8.00
1932Passenger Automobile Staten Island Bridges only23¢2630 days$6.00
1928Passenger Automobile Staten Island Bridges only25¢6030 days$15.00 (eliminated 1932)
1929Motor Truck, with driver & helper, less than 2 tons45¢10030 days$45.00 (reduced to $40 in 1932)
1932Motor Truck, with driver & helper, less than 2 tons40¢5030 days$40.00
1929Motor Truck, with driver & helper, 2 to 5 tons60¢10030 days$60.00
1929Motor Truck, with driver & helper, over 5 tons75¢10030 days$75.00
1929Tractor with Trailer, driver with helper75¢10030 days$75.00
F-41934 / 1935Motor Truck, 2 axles, less than 2 tons
2 years
1930Passenger Auto? 35¢ 12 7 days$4.20
1930Passenger Auto? 40¢ 12 14 days$4.80
H-3 1942/1943Passenger Automobile 26 2 years?$6.00
H-4 1951, 1965, 1967Passenger Automobile
20¢ 40 30 days$10.00
H-51969Passenger Automobile
40¢252 Years?$10.00
1969-1972Employees Personal Passn/an/aunkunknownn/a
.
Commutation Tickets & Books - PANYNJ
.
seriesissue datesused forface value
per ticket
actual valuebook qty
"# of trips"
good forbook purchase price
H-41972Passenger Automobile2030 days$10.00
H-4 1973Passenger Automobile 20 30 days$10.00
H-4 1975Passenger Automobile 20 30 days$10.00
H-4 1977Passenger Automobile 20 30 days$20.00
H-5 1976Passenger Automobile 12 Dec 31, 1976$9.60
H-5 1977Passenger Automobile 12 Dec 31, 1977$9.60
CP 1980Carpool Automobile 60 6 months$30.00
1990Passenger Vehicle 20 30 days$40.00
1991Universal Commuter $4 20 until used$72.00
post 1972Employees Personal Pass (red number 12) n/a unk unkn/a
ca. 1977Employees Personal Pass (black number 12) n/a unk unkn/a

Combination Tickets?
.

.
   Another extremely interesting item furnished for this page by George S. Cuhaj, is this intaglio printers plate and printers proof for a pass for the bridge & tunnel crossings for the Port of New York Authority.

   It is not known specifically what such a pass would be used for other than perhaps for city or state government or PNYA agency officials and to the best of his recollection, George does not recall encountering an issued pass conforming to this design.



Port of New York Authority - Pass For Toll Crossings
Rand McNally intaglio plate block with printers proof

collection of George S. Cuhaj
.

.

TABLE OF CONTENTS


PANYNJ Toll Receipts

   As with the TBTA toll receipts, they were the most disposable. Who kept them?    

   I have only one PANYNJ Toll Receipt in my collection.


circa 1976- Bayonne Bridge - $1.50
While normally any extraneous writing on an issue would be distracting, I decided to look up the telephone number. It is to the Goethals Bridge Administration Office!
authors collection
.

.
TABLE OF CONTENTS


Historical Toll Fares and Information Time Line for PANYNJ Crossings
.
   Toll fares and information throughout the years. As I researched the PNYA and PANYNJ Annual Report, I came across mentions of scrip, commutation books and continuation tickets. So I compiled them in a chronological order and published them here.

   The toll fare structure of the Port of New York Authority was cumbersome (and has kind of returned to that way, what with Peak / Off Peak / Overnight Truck Tolls for both cash amounts and E-ZPass discounts)

   The structures were revised numerous times to reflect the opening of additional crossings, public request and traffic flow. Only in later years after 1970, did it actually get raised to compensate for increased costs of operation.

   Fortunately, and most conveniently, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has expended the effort and made digital scans of their of annual reports dating back to their inception in 1921, and available online for free (always a plus!).

   It was surprising to learn that the PNYA not only charged per vehicle but for additional passengers as well. Oh, how that would NOT go over well in this day & age! So in short, while a car & driver was charged 50 cents, each additional passenger was charged a nickel. So a car, driver and passenger paid a toll of 55 cents. Families were big back then, so I just imagine the scene at a toll booth on a Sunday morning with a family enroute to the Jersey shore for the day:

toll collector:
father / husband:
mother / wife: 
father (thinking): 
toll collector:  
father:  
mother in law:
father: 
toll collector:
"Good morning sir."
"Good morning to you. Let's see, theres me; the missus, her mother, (man thinking to himself "why did the old bag have to come!?!?!") and three kids.
Junior! Sit up so the man can see you!"
"Four kids, sorry." ("Damn that just cost me a nickel.")
"That'll be 80 cents please." (husband rifling through pocket - chink rattle clink jingle),
"Oh damn I dropped a dime, hang on let me get it."
"Herbert! Watch your language in front of the children!"
"Yes mother..." (indistinct muttering under breath) "There ya go, 80 cents.
"Thank you sir, have a nice day. Drive safely please."

   (And with any luck, his toll fare on the way home was 75 cents when he buried his mother-in-law at the beach!) LOL

   A forgotten but interesting insight to the age; were the tolls collected for animals ridden, led or herded. Can you just picture 50 head of cattle enroute to the meat packing district in Manhattan being herded through the Holland Tunnel? And yet we complain now when we are stuck in non-moving traffic in the tunnel behind a sanitation truck! Been there done that, and with no air conditioning!

   Another forgotten detail: when first opened, automobiles and trucks could pull up to a toll booth on either drivers side or the passenger side of the vehicle! That means a drivers helper or passenger could pay the toll. This arrangement was phased out in the late 1940's, as not all vehicles has passengers, and traffic would back up at the drivers side toll booths.

   Dates are of the annual report, and were published at the conclusion of the operating year.

1928
Toll Fare Structure


toll group description amount
I motorcycles, bicycles, horse & rider 25¢
II passenger automobiles, ambulances, hearses 50¢
extra riders in vehicle 5¢
III horse drawn vehicle & rider 50¢
IV motor truck with driver & helper, less than 2 tons 60¢
V motor truck with driver & helper, 2 tons to 4 1/2 tons 75¢
VI motor truck with driver & helper, 5 tons and over $1.00
VII bus $1.00
VIII tractor-trailer $1.00
Special
IX tractor only 75¢
extra trailer 50¢
special vehicle (not defined in the annual report) $2.00
pedestrian 5¢
No tolls are collected for Army, Navy, Police Department or Fire Department vehicles.
   
   It was proposed and instituted in 1928, that a commutation rates for passenger vehicles be instituted:


12 trips good for one week: $4.20 (35¢ per trip) or
12 trips good for two weeks: $4.80 (40¢ per trip)
.

.
1929
Truck Commutation Rates

   As listed in the annual report for this year, commutation rates for motor trucks was instituted:
  • motor truck with driver & helper, less than 2 tons, 2 axles: 100 trips for $45
  • motor truck with driver & helper, 2 tons to 5 tons, 2 axles: 100 trips for $60
  • motor truck with driver & helper, 5 tons & over, 2 axles: 100 trips for $75
  • tractor trailer with driver & helper, 3 axles: $100 trips for $75
.
.
1932
Toll Fare Schedule Revised, Combination Tickets Offered

   This year, it is mentioned that the institution of combination tickets, (that is, in other words; discounted continuous trips using both the Holland Tunnel and the Bayonne Bridge) was enacted on April 1, 1932. Combination rates in effect with the Holland Tunnel and Arthur Kill Bridges were reduced, commensurate with the reduction in single trip rates.  In order to encourage a more extensive demand for commutation rates applicable on the three Staten Island Bridges, the 26-trip passenger commutation coupon book was reduced from $8.00 to $6.00 giving the commuter the benefit of a twenty-three cent one-way toll compared with twenty-five cents applicable on competing ferries.

   The 60-trip passenger commutation coupon book, which formerly sold at $15.00 was eliminated. Commutation rates on small trucks were reduced from forty-five cents to forty cents per trip, and all commutation truck tickets were issued for sale on the basis of a minimum of 50 trips per month instead of 100 trips per month. The results obtained from these reductions and changes have been encouraging.

   
   On April 1, 1932, the original toll schedule was revised downward in order to partially offset reduced competing ferry rates. The changes involved the elimination of a higher rate for sedans, and places all passenger automobiles on a flat rate of fifty cents on all crossings At the same time, trucks of capacity up to and including two tons were reduced from sixty cents to fifty cents.

 
single trip continuous trip (2 hour limit) Bayonne Bridge
& Holland Tunnel
continuous trip (2 hour limit) Bayonne Bridge
& Outerbridge or Goethals
passenger automobile, station wagon, hearse, ambulance, tractor without trailer, or extra trailers:  50¢ 75¢ 75¢
horse drawn vehicle 50¢ not permitted
75¢
passenger automobile with 2 wheel trailer 70¢ 1.35 1.35
motorcycle,
bicycle or animals per head
25¢ 35¢
not permitted
35¢
truck less than 2 tons, 2 axles 50¢ 75¢ 75¢
truck 2 to 5 tons, 2 axles 75¢ $1.00 $1.25
truck more than 5 tons, 2 axles $1.00 $1.25 $1.50
tractor & semi-trailer, 6 wheel truck, 3 axles $1.10 $1.50 $1.75
tractor-trailer or truck and trailer with 4 axles $1.50  $2.50 $2.75
bus, 2 axles $1.00 $1.40 $1.50
bus, 3 axles $1.10 $1.50 $1.60
pedestrians .05 ... ...

   Also, on November 15, 1931, the toll for passengers in automobiles was abolished.
.

.
1933
Truck Commutation Books

   On November 1, a truck commutation book was discontinued and another to replace it was instituted: the 25 ticket book good for 6 months replaced the 50 ticket book good for 1 month issue. These tickets were good on all Staten Island Bridges. I believe this 25 ticket issue is represented in Series F-4 1934/1935 by the example in my collection:
   

authors collection
.
..

On November 1st, modification was made in motor truck commutation with the hope of increasing revenues and benefiting the public. Tickets comprising fifty coupons formerly offered for sale were good only for the calendar month in which purchased. These were discontinued and in place thereof tickets comprising twenty-five coupons were made available good for six months after the month in which purchased. These tickets are also good over all Staten Island bridges the same as formerly.
.

.
1934
Prepaid Tickets, Scrip Issues

   This years annual report mentions the following: use of the prepaid tickets was discontinued as of 12/31/1934.

   As a substitute for them, a form of toll scrip in lots of 25 tickets in denominations of 25
¢, 50¢, 75¢ and $1.00 was issued. This scrip was acceptable either singly or can be combined to pay the amount totaling the toll fare required ($1.00 scrip + 50¢ scrip = good for $1.50 toll). This scrip was now applicable for all crossings.

   As such, the existing toll fare structure was now revised to be in multiples of 25
¢ so that amounts of less that 25 cent were not necessary eliminating the need for nickels and quarters (with exception for the 5 cent pedestrian fare).
class description axles amount
1 passenger automobiles, 2 axles and horse drawn vehicles (on bridge only) 2 axles 50¢
2 motorcycles 25¢
3 bus $1.00
4 motor truck with driver & helper, less than 2 tons 2 axles 50¢
5 motor truck with driver & helper, 2 tons to 5 tons 2 axles 75¢
6 motor truck with driver & helper, 5 tons and over 2 axles $1.00
7 tractor & semi-trailer, less than 5 tons 3 axles $1.00
8 tractor & semi-trailer, more than 5 tons 3 axles $1.25
9 tractor & semi-trailer, 4 axles $1.50
10 bicycles, and animals (per head) 25¢
pedestrians 5¢
No tolls are collected for Army, Navy, Police Department or Fire Department vehicles.
.

.
1935
Pedestrian Toll Reduced

   Pedestrian toll on George Washington Bridge reduced from 10 cent to 5 cents.
.

.
1937
Revision to Toll Fare Structure

   
More revisions to the basic toll fare structure took place this year, in reflection of the opening of the first tube of the Lincoln Tunnel:

class description axles amount
1 passenger automobiles, 2 axles and horse drawn vehicles (on bridge only) 2 axles 50¢
2 motorcycles; animals ridden, led or herded 25¢
3 bus $1.00
4 truck, less than 2 tons 2 axles 50¢
5 truck, 2 tons to 5 tons 2 axles 75¢
6 truck, 5 tons and over 2 axles $1.00
7 tractor & semi-trailer, less than 5 tons 3 axles 75¢
8 tractor & semi-trailer, more than 5 tons or bus 3 axles $1.25
9 tractor & semi-trailer or trailer 4 axles $1.50
10 pedestrian with no bicycles 5¢
No tolls are collected for Army, Navy, Police Department or Fire Department vehicles.
.

.
1944
Female Toll Collectors During WW 2

   The Port Authority continued the practice, established in 1943, of hiring women toll collectors to replace the men that were called away for military service for World War 2.
.

.
1951
Commutation Tickets Expanded


   Effective September 1, passenger car tolls for frequent users who cannot take advantage of our commutation tickets were reduced 20 per cent, from 50 cents to 40 cents, through the availability of twenty-five-trip transferable $10 books of tickets, good for two years in addition to the year in which they are sold.

   Toll scrip, usable by any type of vehicle in lieu of cash fare, can be bought at a 10 per cent discount in quantities of twenty-five. The regular price of this scrip is 25 cents, 50 cents, 75 cents, $1.00 and $1.50 each.

   Commutation rates have been in effect on the Port Authority's three Staten Island Bridges for more than twenty years. Commuters may buy twenty-six-trip tickets for $6.00, or at a rate of 23 cents a trip. You will recall that our passenger vehicle commutation toll ticket for regular users on our Hudson River crossings was introduced on June 15, 1950.

   The $10 ''H-4" ticket, which is good for thirty days and provides for forty trips, was used by 32.2 per cent of all passenger cars on weekdays during a test period in December. The use of this ticket permits the commuter to make five round trips a week across the Hudson at a 25-cent rate. As you will kindly note, our experience with commutation and other reduced-rate tickets is discussed in detail in the report that follows.


   The passenger vehicle commutation toll ticket for regular users of our Hudson River crossings was available for the full twelve months of 1951, having been introduced on June 15, 1950. The $10 'H-4'' ticket, which is good for thirty days and provides for forty trips, was used by 32.2 per cent of all our trans-Hudson passenger vehicles on weekdays during a test period in December. The use of this ticket permits a commuter to make five round trips a week across the Hudson at a rate of 25 rents a trip. It was used by 20.1 per cent of all passenger cars including those on weekdays.

   Saturdays, Sundays and holidays in 1951, as compared with 17.5 per cent in the six and one-half months during which it was available in 1950. During the year, 32.8 per cent of the weekday passenger car trips at the George Washington Bridge, 26.9 per cent at the Lincoln Tunnel and 20.7 per cent at the Holland Tunnel, or 27.5 per cent at the three Hudson River crossings, were using commutation tickets. A total of 9,850,249 passenger car trips were made with commutation tickets in 1951. Commutation rates have been in effect on the Port Authority's three Staten Island Bridges for more than twenty years.   

   Commuters may buy twenty-six-trip tickets for $6.00, or at a rate of 23 cents a trip. During 1951, 33.5 per cent of the passenger cars using the Staten Island Bridges took advantage of this low rate. A combination rate of 75 cents a through-trip for the crossing of two of the Staten Island Bridges, or a combination trip by way of a Staten Island Bridge and a Hudson River crossing also has been in effect for several years.



.

.

Toll Cuts Are Mode for Regular Passenger Car, Bus and Truck Trips

   The Port Authority Commissioners on June 14, 1951 authorized the second toll cut in less than fifteen months. Effective September 1, passenger car tolls for frequent users who cannot take advantage of the commutation tickets were reduced 20 per cent, from 50 cents to 40 cents, through the availability of twenty-five-trip, transferable $10 books of tickets good for two years in addition to the year in which they are sold.

   Toll scrip, usable by any type of vehicle in lieu of cash fare, can be bought at a 10 per cent discount in quantities of twenty-five. Scrip is sold in 25 cents, 50cents, 75 cents, $1.00 and $1.50 denominations.
.

.
1954
Commutation Books

   Commutation Books are now offered for sale at gasoline & service stations, banks and other select locations to reduce dwell times and congestion at toll booths. As a result, the 30 day expiration date of commutation books extended to 35 days to encourage purchase at these locations.  Also, a 40 trip Commutation Book for Staten Island Crossings is introduced.
.

.
1957
Automatic Toll Collection Equipment Tested

   Trial of automatic toll collection equipment began at the George Washington Bridge on August 6th as part of the continuing effort to provide more convenient service for patrons, to improve traffic handling capabilities and to reduce operating costs. Designed for passenger-car patrons with exact change, the installation totals four machines, two in the New Jersey-bound lanes and two in the New York-bound lanes. Tests are expected to continue into 1958 at which time an evaluation will be made of the installation to determine its possible permanent utilization at the George Washington Bridge and other facilities.
.

.
1958
Automatic Tolls Collection

   The Port Authority's tunnels and bridges personnel have two main objectives: to provide the most convenient and expeditious service for patrons and to reduce operating costs. To further these objectives, research and trial on the feasibility of automatic tolls collection continued throughout the year.

   The machines for automatic service to passenger car patrons with exact change, which were installed in four lanes at the George Washington Bridge main plaza in August 1957, have been constantly improved. Two additional automatic lanes have been installed on the crossing's Palisades Interstate Parkway plaza. Thus, six lanes at the George Washington Bridge are now equipped for automatic service to passenger car patrons.

   Experience to date indicates that automatic service for passenger cars is feasible but can be utilized only to a limited degree because of approach traffic patterns and the high percentage of reduced-rate and commutation tickets during peak hours. Studies are now being made of means for handling ticket traffic automatically in the same lanes with exact-change traffic. Solution of this problem will permit more widespread use of automatic service.

.

.
1963
Female Toll Collector Program

   The civilian toll collector program was considerably accelerated during 1963 as Police Officers were replaced by women toll collectors at all tolls plazas of the George Washington Bridge. The staff of 90 women who started at the Lincoln Tunnel in October, 1962, was expanded to a total of 270 women operating both the Lincoln Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge tolls plazas by the end of 1963.

   This expansion was necessary to free Port Authority police manpower for increased traffic and patrol duties. By mid-year the toll collector program was a full year ahead of plan. The program had been launched in 1962 with an intensive six-month period of preparation which included a mass recruitment program, uniform selection and procurement, and the establishment of a tolls training center. With the success of the program at the Lincoln Tunnel immediately apparent, recruitment began late in 1962 for a similar program at the George Washington Bridge.

   Operations began at the main tolls plaza in April, 1963, the lower level tolls plaza in August and finally at the Palisades Interstate Parkway plaza in October. The introduction of women toll collectors at the Holland Tunnel is scheduled for early 1964.
.

.
1966
Female Toll Collector Program Expanded


   The women toll collector program which began in 1962 at the Lincoln Tunnel is now in effect at the three Hudson River crossings. The changeover to women toll collectors permits reassignment of police officers to specialized police duties. It is expected that civilian personnel will be utilized at the Staten Island Bridges starting in 1966.
.

.
1970
One Way Toll Collection

   On August 12, 1970 the Port Authority joined with the New York State Thruway Authority and the New York State Bridge Authority in starting a one-way toll collection system on 12 Hudson River and interstate New York-New Jersey crossings. This new procedure has sped up the flow of traffic and eased congestion. Operators of all vehicles now pay the toll on their eastbound trip, and thereby eliminate the need to stop to pay a toll on the westbound trip.

   The new collection system did not represent a change in existing rates, because surveys had demonstrated that virtually all vehicles using the 12 facilities made round trip crossings. In addition to providing greater comfort and convenience for the traveler, the procedure has improved the economy and efficiency of bridge and tunnel operations.

   The region-wide system includes 
all the 12 interstate and Hudson River crossings over a 130-mile distance, as follows: The George Washington Bridge, the Lincoln Tunnel, Holland Tunnel, Bayonne Bridge, Goethals Bridge and the Outerbridge Crossing, all operated by the Port Authority; the Tappan Zee Bridge, operated by the New York State Thruway Authority; and the Rip Van Winkle Bridge, Kingston - Rhinecliff Bridge, Mid-Hudson Bridge, Newburgh - Beacon Bridge and Bear Mountain Bridge, all operated by the New York State Bridge Authority.
.

.
1971
One-Way Toll Collection
   
   The one-way toll collection system, begun in 1970, with tolls collected only in the eastbound direction at all six Port Authority vehicular crossings, continued to please the public. This change permitted elimination of unnecessary toll booths at the George Washington Bridge, the Lincoln Tunnel and the Holland Tunnel. Work at the Bayonne and Goethals Bridges will be completed in 1972. At the Outerbridge Crossing certain toll lanes have been closed pending complete
plaza reconstruction.
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1975
Toll Fare Increase

   To finance the bus terminal construction and to prepare to finance other mass transportation projects, as well as to weight the individual traveler's choice in favor of public transportation, the Port Authority made an historical revision to one of its key revenue sources.

   On May 5, for the first time in 48 years, the tolls on its tunnels and bridges were increased by approximately 50 percent for all except buses and those who form carpools.

   At year-end, a proceeding was pending before the Federal Highway Administrator to determine the reasonableness and justness of the new toll schedule under applicable federal law.
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1976
Toll Fare Increase Decision To Court


   The Federal Highway Administrator ordered a hearing, held in New York City in November, to inquire whether the Port Authority's May 5, 1975 bridge toll increase is "reasonable and just". At year-end a determination by the Administrative Law Judge who presided, and who must issue a recommended decision to the Federal Highway Administrator, was still pending.

   The increase in Port Authority vehicular tolls, the first in almost 50 years, was instituted to further federal and state energy, environmental and transportation policies and to provide the Port Authority with revenues needed to finance mass transportation projects.
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1977
Note L - Toll Increases

   In May, 1975, the Port Authority revised its toll schedules for its six interstate vehicular crossings resulting in additional tolls of about $40,000,000 for the year 1977. Litigation instituted in 1977 challenging the decision of the Federal Highway Administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation which upheld the toll increase is presently pending. On February 2, 1978, plaintiffs' complaint was dismissed against the Federal Highway Administrator and the Secretary of Transportation and on March 16, 1978, the suit against the Port Authority was also dismissed.

   Plaintiffs sought to invalidate the toll increase and in the interim to enjoin the Port Authority from disbursing funds received pursuant to the toll increase and to impound such revenues in a trust fund administered by the court to be used to reduce tolls in the event the court finds the toll increase invalid. The plaintiffs have indicated their intention to appeal the court's decision.

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1978
Toll Fare Increase Appellate Court Decision Upheld

   Litigation challenging the toll increase was dismissed by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in 1978, a decision which was affirmed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in January 1979. According to an announcement made by plaintiff automobile clubs, no further appeal is to be taken from the court's decision.
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1983
Toll Fare Increase

   The tunnels and
bridges tolls schedules were revised and adjusted effective January 1, 1984. Tolls were increased for automobile users who do not purchase commuter discount books, to $2.00 from the prior one-way toll of $1.50, and for commercial vehicles (other than buses) and trucks. (See Note K-2.) The bridge tolls increase is presently under review by an investigative team appointed by the Federal Highway Administrator after he received three complaints about the bridge tolls increase.
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1987
Toll Fare Increase

   Effective April 12, 1987 the tolls schedules were increased for the six tunnel and bridge facilities effective April 12, 1987. The significant revisions included an increase in passenger automobile tolls from $2.00 to $3.00, bus tolls from $2.00 to $3.00 and truck tolls from $1.50 per axle to $3.00 per axle.
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1989
Toll Registration System

  The first phase of a new $9.3 million Toll Registration System that will be installed at all tunnels and bridges by 1991 began operation during the year at the Bayonne Bridge. The system simplifies the processing procedure and reduces the time required to collect and record toll and vehicle data.

   An Automatic Vehicle Identification System (AVI) was installed in July to provide speedier and more efficient processing of
toll transactions for buses using the Lincoln Tunnel's exclusive bus lane "XBL". Through this innovation, bus companies are billed monthly based on the recorded trips their buses make. The system helps reduce toll transaction time, congestion, fuel consumption and air pollution. Currently, 23 bus carriers are participating in the program, with some 1,500 buses using AVI equipment at the Lincoln Tunnel on a typical weekday morning
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1990
Exact Fare Lanes Instituted & Electronic Toll Collection System Test

   At the Goethals and George Washington Bridges and Outerbridge Crossing, exact fare toll lanes were established to expedite passenger car traffic flow during peak periods. Due to positive feedback from motorists, exact toll lanes will be established at the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels in 1991. • To increase the availability of commuter ticket books, satellite ticket sales outlets were opened at the Goethals and George Washington Bridges in October. In November, commuter ticket book sales outlets were also established at the Holland and Lincoln Tunnel Administration Buildings. The outlets supplement the mail sales system introduced in 1989 by addressing the special needs of some customers.


   An Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) system test was initiated at the Goethals Bridge for cars, trucks and buses in an effort to provide customers with convenient alternatives to conventional toll payment and to improve the region's mobility and environment. Plans are under way to introduce the system at all Port Authority bridges and tunnels, while working with other toll agencies to establish a compatible regional ETC system.

   Electronic Toll Collection, in use on the Exclusive Bus Lane (XBL) of the Lincoln Tunnel since 1987, reached 95 percent subscription of all commuter buses. In December the XBL also marked its 20th anniversary as the nation's first dedicated contra-flow bus lane. To date, more than six million buses and 244 million passengers have used the lane to cut their morning commuting time by 10 to 25 minutes. The region's transportation agencies joined in marking the anniversary of the XBL, a pioneering innovation that has been widely replicated to offer commuters a quicker, more reliable transit alternative in many U.S. metropolitan areas.

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1991
Testing of Electronic Toll Collection, Toll Fare Increase

   In 1991, testing of an Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) system at the Goethals Bridge was completed, including specifications for common tags and readers, which will allow for the introduction of a universal one-tag ETC system for the New York-New Jersey-Pennsylvania area. ETC will provide motorists with a convenient alternative to conventional toll payment and improve regional mobility and the environment by speeding the flow of traffic.

   Effective April 7, 1991, passenger automobile tolls at the Port Authority's six Hudson River vehicular crossings were increased from $3.00 to $4.00 and truck tolls from $3.00 per axle to $4.00 per axle.
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1992
Use of part-time toll collectors instituted, Electronic Toll Collection Progress

   Considerable progress was made in the planned implementation of a regional electronic toll collection (ETC) system by toll agencies in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. By permitting vehicles to use a single identification tag at facilities operated by participating agencies in these three states, ETC will provide motorists with a convenient alternative to conventional toll payment and improve regional mobility and the environment by speeding traffic flow.

   The interagency group selected 'E-Z Pass" as the name for the compatible ETC system expected to be phased in throughout the region over the next few years. The tristate, seven-agency group collectively serves 37 percent of all toll traffic in the U.S. and registers more than 1.4 billion toll trips annually - which would make theirs the largest application of ETC technology in the nation.
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1995
Improved Traffic Flow, Electronic Toll Collection

   At busy bridge and tunnel toll plazas, more exact fare toll lanes help speed the traffic flow and cut commutation time for travelers.
   
   Also continued to put new technologies to work to add capacity across the system and to advance E-ZPass electronic toll collection for the region. E-ZPass will help improve traffic flow and enhance customer service by simplifying toll payment. First E-ZPass implementation is planned for in third quarter 1997 at the three Staten Island crossings:
the Bayonne Bridge, Goethals Bridge and Outerbridge Crossing - to serve the growing market already created by the E-ZPass electronic toll collection system in operation at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge.

   Current plans call for the implementation of electronic toll collection at all Port Authority vehicular crossings by the end of 1998.
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1996
Number of Exact Toll Lanes Increased

    The number of exact toll lanes was expanded from 15 to 21 during morning and evening rush hours at the George Washington Bridge, Holland Tunnel, Bayonne Bridge and Outerbridge Crossing to improve traffic flow. Additionally, an exact toll lane for trucks at the George Washington Bridge was established.
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1997
E-Z Pass Installed

   Travel on Port Authority tunnels and bridges got a little easier in 1997, thanks to E-ZPass. The electronic toll collection system was installed at the Bayonne Bridge on June 29, followed later in the summer by the Goethals Bridge, Outerbridge Crossing and George Washington Bridge. Holland and Lincoln tunnel commuters welcomed E-ZPass in October. Each opening was accomplished without any measurable service disruptions. Customers eagerly enrolled in E-ZPass throughout the phased implementation, and by year-end, electronic toll collection users on weekdays averaged 38 percent.
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2001
Toll Fare Increases, Peak / Off Peak Toll Structure Institution, and...

   On January 25, 2001, the Board of Commissioners authorized bridge and tunnel toll increases, which will become effective on March 25, 2001. These increases are presently expected to provide funds, when combined with other Port Authority revenues, to carry out a proposed $9 billion five-year capital program pertaining to the Port Authority's bridges and tunnels, PATH and other facilities. The Port Authority last raised bridge and tunnel tolls in 1991.

   It also approved the institution of the "Time of Day Pricing Initiative" toll rate structure, a/k/a Peak / Off Peak / Truck Overnight Tolling, in both pricing structures: cash and E-ZPass, and for all vehicle classes. This Peak / Off Peak toll structure took effect March 25.


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In memoriam to the 84 employees of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey lost on September 11, 2001. 

   Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the subsequent collapses of the World Trade Center buildings; all bridges and tunnels (PANYNJ, TBTA and the free crossings on the East River), all airports and all mass transit systems in the New York City Metropolitan area were shut down.


   The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was the operator of the World Trade Center buildings and site, and had their headquarters occupying multiple floors in 1 World Trade Center (the North Tower). With the North Tower's collapse at 10:28 am, the PANYNJ lost its "nerve center" containing a significant amount of its corporate and logistical support structure.
An estimated 1,400 Port Authority employees worked in the World Trade Center.
 Eighty-four employees, including thirty-seven Port Authority Police Officers; the Port Authority Executive Director, Neil D. Levin; and Port Authority Police Superintendent Fred V. Morrone, died in the collapse. Also destroyed were its vaults containing decades of documents, records, reports and historical memorabilia. 

   With the exception of the Holland Tunnel, all of the Port Authority’s bridges and tunnels had fully re-opened by the morning of September 13, 2001. In addition, the E-ZPass electronic
toll collection system had resumed operations, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal had re-opened and bus carriers had resumed service. The Holland Tunnel would remain closed to all vehicles except emergency service and law enforcement vehicles until October 15, 2001. Even after it reopened, the Holland Tunnel remained off limits to commercial vehicles.

   In addition, a single-occupancy vehicle prohibition (which was instituted by the Port Authority on September 28, 2001, in cooperation with the City of New York) remains applicable to eastbound traffic through the Holland Tunnel and Lincoln Tunnel on weekdays between 6 A.M. and 10 A.M. Commercial vehicles using the George Washington Bridge are currently restricted to using the upper level.

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2002
Single Occupancy Vehicle Ban Lifted

   While traffic volumes nearly recovered, the distribution of traffic among the crossings changed significantly as a result of operating restrictions and shifting economic conditions in New York City. The Holland Tunnel operated through the year with restrictions, including a weekday 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. single-occupant auto ban to New York, and a ban of large trucks into New York City and all trucks into New Jersey.

   At the Lincoln Tunnel, the weekday morning single-occupant auto ban introduced following September 11 was lifted in April 2002.
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2003
E-Z Pass Lanes

   For improved customer service, we introduced three new 25-mph E-ZPass lanes
toll lanes at the Outerbridge Crossing that allow motorists to pass through at more efficient speeds.

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2007
Electronic Toll Collection

   In 2007, the agency proposed an innovative approach to address congestion generated by toll-collection activities at the bridge and tunnel crossings – elimination of the tollbooths by replacing them with an all-electronic toll-collection system.

   The agency authorized initial planning to determine the feasibility of such a system that would replace traditional tollbooths with electronic scanners and cameras in overhead gantries and would enable customers to pay tolls through E-ZPass or other methods. The all-electronic toll system would help smooth choke points at bridges and tunnels, reduce traveler delays, and provide benefits to regional air quality. The study will examine the potential to achieve these benefits and effectively operate alternate toll-collection systems.

   It is also expected to determine In 2007, the Port Authority renewed plans to redevelop other benefits of electronic toll-collection, such as the recording its midtown Manhattan bus terminal in conjunction with an and transmission of real-time traffic information at and through these key transportation facilities.

   While the proposal is still in the early stages of planning, it has the potential to transform the way that toll revenues are collected and help mitigate the negative impacts of congestion.
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2008
Toll Fare Increase

   At the beginning of 2008, the Board of Commissioners approved the tunnels and bridges toll increase and a PATH fare increase. The final action was substantially modified from the original proposal as a result of public participation in the hearing process. The increases went into effect in March 2008.
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2011
NY-NJ Staten Island Bridges Plan

   Among the key service initiatives undertaken in 2011 was an adjustment in the New York-New Jersey Staten Island Bridges Plan. The Port Authority plan now provides savings of up to 50 percent for E-ZPass users and up to 60 percent off the cash toll for motorists who make up to 10 trips in a 30-day period when using the Bayonne and Goethals bridges and the Outerbridge Crossing. The previous plan required 20 trips in a 35-day period. For regular commuters, this can translate into more than $1,000 per year in savings.

   The toll and fare schedules for the Port Authority's six vehicular crossings were revised effective September 18, 2011. The toll for automobiles paying with cash was increased from $8.00 to $12.00, with further increases of $1.00 scheduled in December 2012, 2014 and 2015;

   The cash toll for truck classes 2-6 was increased from $8.00 to $13.00 per axle, with further increases of $2.00 per axle scheduled in December each year from 2012 through 2015;

   The cash toll for buses carrying 10 or more people was increased from $6.00 to $20.00, with further increases of $1.00 scheduled in December each year from 2012 through 2015.

   Discounts are available for vehicles using the E-ZPass electronic toll collection system and certain designated user programs.

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2012
Toll Fares Increase

   Toll and fare schedules for the Port Authority’s six vehicular crossings were revised effective September 18, 2011.

   The toll for automobiles paying with cash was increased from $8.00 to $12.00 in 2011 and to $13.00 in December 2012, with further increases of $1.00 scheduled in December 2014 and 2015;

   The cash toll for truck classes 2-6 was increased from $8.00 to $13.00 per axle in 2011 and to $15.00 per axle in December 2012, with further increases of $2.00 per axle scheduled in December each year from 2013 through 2015;

   The cash toll for buses carrying 10 or more people was increased from $6.00 to $20.00 in 2011 and to $21.00 in December 2012, with further increases of $1.00 scheduled in December each year from 2013 through 2015.

   Discounts are available for vehicles using the E-ZPass electronic toll collection system and certain designated user programs.


2013
Toll Fares Increase Per 2011 Plan

2014
Toll Fares Increase Per 2011 Plan

2015
Toll Fares Increase Per 2011 Plan

2019
Toll Fares Increase Per 2011 Plan
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Goethals Goes Cashless


   As of September 4, the Goethals Bridge is fully cashless. All three Staten Island Crossings are now cashless. Toll Collectors remain at Holland and Lincoln Tunnels and the George Washington Bridge.
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2020
Toll Fares Increase

   New toll rates to go into effect January 5, 2020. Cash tolls will increase to $16 from $15.


Holland Tunnel
1927

George Washington Bridge
1931

Goethals
1928 (rebuilt 2017) 

Outerbridge
1928 

Bayonne
1931

Lincoln Tunnel
(Midtown Hudson Tunnel)
1937


1927

50¢

(bi-directional
toll collection)

1931–1970

50¢

(bi-directional
toll collection)

1928

50¢ 
35¢ commutation

(bi-directional
toll collection)

1937

50¢

(bi-directional
toll collection)

 

 

 

 

9/1/1929

< 2 ton - 60¢
> 2 ton - 5 ton 75¢
> 5 ton - $1.00
pedestrians - 5¢

 

 

8/1970

$1.00 

eastbound (to NY) only
toll collection started

8/1970

$1.00 

eastbound (to NY) only
toll collection started 


 8/1970

$1.00

eastbound (to NY) only toll collection started


8/1970

$1.00

eastbound (to NY) only toll collection started

5/5/1975

$1.50

5/5/1975

$1.50

5/5/1975

$1.50

5/5/1975 

 $1.50?

4/12/1987

$3.00
bus $3.00
trucks per axle $3.00

4/12/1987

$3.00
bus $3.00
trucks per axle $3.00

4/12/1987

$3.00
bus $3.00
trucks per axle $3.00

4/12/1987

$3.00
bus $3.00
trucks per axle $3.00

4/7/1991

$4.00
trucks per axle $4.00

4/7/1991

$4.00
trucks per axle $4.00

4/7/1991

$4.00
trucks per axle $4.00

4/7/1991

$4.00
trucks per axle $4.00

3/25/2001

$6.00

3/25/2001

$6.00

3/25/2001

$6.00

3/25/2001

$6.00

3/2/2008

$8.00
trucks per axles $8.00

3/2/2008

$8.00

3/2/2008

$8.00

3/2/2008

$8.00

9/18/2011

$12.00
bus $20.00
trucks per axles $13.00

9/18/2011

$12.00
bus $20.00
trucks per axles $13.00

9/18/2011

$12.00
bus $20.00
trucks per axles $13.00

9/18/2011

$12.00
bus $20.00
trucks per axles $13.00

12/2012

$13.00
bus $21.00
trucks per axle $15.00

12/2012

$13.00
bus $21.00
trucks per axle $15.00

12/2012

$13.00
bus $21.00
trucks per axle $15.00

12/2012

$13.00
bus $21.00
trucks per axle $15.00

12/2013    
  bus $22.00
  trucks per axle $17.00
12/2013    
  bus $22.00
  trucks per axle $17.00
12/2013    
  bus $22.00
  trucks per axle $17.00
12/2013    
  bus $22.00
  trucks per axle $17.00

12/2014

$14.00
bus $23.00
truck per axle $19.00

12/2014

$14.00
bus $22.00
truck per axle $19.00

12/2014

$14.00
bus $22.00
truck per axle $19.00

12/2014

$14.00
bus $22.00
truck per axle $19.00

12/6/2015 to present

$15.00 
bus $24.00
truck per axles $21.00

12/6/2015 – present

$15.00 
bus $23.00
truck per axles $21.00

12/6/2015
- present

$15.00
bus $23.00
truck per axles $21.00

12/6/2015 - present

$15.00 
bus $23.00
truck per axles $21.00

1/5/2020   $16.00 cash
  $13.75 E-ZPass Peak
  $11.75  E-ZPass Off-Peak
  bus $25.00
  truck per axle $22.00
1/5/2020   $16.00 cash
  $13.75 E-ZPass Peak
  $11.75  E-ZPass Off-Peak
  bus $25.00
  truck per axle $22.00
1/5/2020   $16.00 cash
  $13.75 E-ZPass Peak
  $11.75  E-ZPass Off-Peak
  bus $25.00
  truck per axle $22.00
1/5/2020   $16.00 cash
  $13.75 E-ZPass Peak
  $11.75  E-ZPass Off-Peak
  bus $25.00
  truck per axle $22.00


see Current Toll chart below
for other vehicle classes
see Current Toll chart below
for other vehicle classes
see Current Toll chart below
for other vehicle classes
see Current Toll chart below
for other vehicle classes

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TABLE OF CONTENTS



Current PANYNJ Crossings - Toll & Vehicle Class Structure
For non-discounted cashless toll only - all crossings same. See PANYNJ website for carpool plan, low emission & resident plans.