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Page 7: Toll Issues from the State of New Jersey
copyright © 2020 ~ Philip M. Goldstein ~ www.nyctollscrip.info

Toll Scrip, Tokens and Ephemera of the States of New York and New Jersey


by Philip M. Goldstein

Page 1Page 2Page 3Page 4Page 5Page 6You are on Page 7
Introduction &
Conclusion

Page Index
Private and
Early City of New York
Toll Bridges, Plank Roads
& Turnpikes
Pre-TBTA AgenciesTriborough Bridge &
Tunnel Authority

MTA Bridges & Tunnels
Port of New York Authority

Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey
State of New York
updated 10/26/2020


State of New Jersey



New Jersey Turnpike AuthorityGarden State ParkwayNew Jersey Expressway Authority /
Atlantic City Expressway
(South Jersey Transportation Authority)


Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission
Delaware River Port Authority
.
County Operated Bridges
Private Bridges / Operators






New Jersey Turnpike

   The New Jersey Turnpike Authority, like the New York State Thruway, was built as a limited access closed ticket highway. But this Agency now overseas the Garden State Parkway as well, which will be discussed in a later chapter.

   The road that is now the New Jersey Turnpike was first planned by the New Jersey State Highway Department as two untolled freeways in 1938. Route 100 was the route from New Brunswick to the George Washington Bridge, plus a spur to the Holland Tunnel (now the Newark Bay Extension of the Turnpike). Route 300 was the southern part of the turnpike from the Delaware Memorial Bridge to New Brunswick. However, the State Highway Department did not have the funds to complete the two freeways, and very little of the road was built under its auspices.

   In 1948, the New Jersey Turnpike Authority was created to build the road, and the two freeways were built as a single toll road. 

   The task of building the turnpike was not an easy one. One major problem was the construction in the city of Elizabeth, where either 450 homes or 32 businesses would be destroyed, depending on the chosen route. The engineers decided to go through the residential area, since they considered it the grittiest and the closest route to both Newark Airport and the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal seaport.

   When construction finally got to Newark, there was the new challenge of deciding to build either over or under the Pulaski Skyway. If construction went above the skyway, the costs would be much higher. If they went under, the costs would be lower, but the roadway would be very close to the Passaic River, making it harder for ships to pass through. The turnpike was ultimately built to pass under. 

   While continuing up to the New Jersey Meadowlands, the crossings were harder because of the fertile marsh land of silt and mud. Near the shallow mud, the mud was filled with crushed stone, and the roadway was built above the water table. In the deeper mud, caissons were sunk down to a firm stratum and filled with sand, then both the caissons and the surrounding areas were covered with blankets of sand. Gradually, the water was brought up, and drained into adjacent meadows. Then, construction of the two major bridges over the Passaic and Hackensack Rivers was completed. The bridges were built to give motorists a clear view of the New York City skyline, but with high retaining walls to create the illusion of not being on a river crossing.

  With the turnpike completed, traffic began to increase, which prompted the NJTA's first widening project. In 1955, the authority proposed to widen the turnpike from four lanes to six lanes (three in each direction) between Exit 4 in Mount Laurel Township and Exit 10 in Woodbridge Township, and from four lanes to an eight-lane, dual-dual setup (2-2-2-2, two express lanes and two local lanes in each direction) between Exit 10 and Exit 14 in Newark.

   In 1966, the Turnpike was widened between Exit 10 and Exit 14 under a new expansion plan. This abolished the express-local roadway plan and created the car and truck-buses lane configuration (3-3-3-3). This project also included closing the old Exit 10 at Woodbridge and replacing it with a new Exit 10 in Edison Township; Exit 11 was also rebuilt to provide complete access to the Garden State Parkway. The dual-dual setup was widened south to Exit 9 in East Brunswick Township in 1973, and again extended farther south in 1990 to Exit 8A in Monroe Township.

   The NJ Turnpike is also infamously noted for one of the worst multi-car pileups in modern highway motoring. Between October 23 and 24, 1973, a series of roadway accidents occurred in the town of Kearny. The first collision occurred at 11:20 p.m. EDT on the 23rd. Further accidents continued to occur until 2:45 a.m. the next day as cars plowed into the unseen accident ahead of them. 

   All told, sixty-six vehicles were involved, and nine people died as a result. Thirty-nine suffered non-fatal injuries. The primary cause of the accident was related to a fire consisting of burning garbage, aggravated by foggy conditions. This produced an area of extremely poor visibility. 

   Electrically powered neon road signs were installed at intervals, along with neon speed limit signs, that could display road conditions as well as temporarily lowered speed limits in advance of hazardous situations (to which have recently been removed due to age and lack of replacement parts):

   

   The Turnpike, being a major north-south thoroughfare as well as connecting New Jersey with Pennsylvania in the south and New York to the east and north, as well as being part of the Eisenhower Interstate System (I-95), it undergoes constant upgrading and reconstruction projects. 

   As with the New York State Thruway, entry cards are used to access the highway, which must be relinquished upon exiting, along with the applicable fare. 

   Unlike the NYS Thruway however, toll scrip is known to have been issued for the NJ Turnpike and appear frequently on eBay. Dates reflect that series of scrip appear to have been issued yearly, as seen by the dates an a perforated edge reveal it was issued in books. It is not yet known what year was the first year of issue, nor the last or is commutation issues were issued. 

   Multiple printers are known for various issues: Rand McNally, Globe as well as National Ticket and known years of issue are witnessed below in the tabulation.

   While I have a few examples, I am only now getting into the in-depth research and tabulation of these issues. Information is certainly welcome - bedt14@aol.com





New Jersey Turnpike Authority Scrip
5 cent (blue) - January 1, 1965
Rand McNally

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
5 cent (blue) - January 2, 1968
Globe Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
5 cent (blue) - January 1, 1970
Rand McNally

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
5 cent (orange) - January 1, 1976
National Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
10 cent (black) - January 2, 1968
Globe Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
10 cent (black) - January 1, 1969
Rand McNally

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
10 cent (black) - January 1, 1970
Rand McNally

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
10 cent (black) - January 1, 1974
Globe Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
10 cent (black) - January 1, 1975
National Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
25 cent (red) - January 1, 1967
Globe Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
50 cent (purple) - January 1, 1983
unknown printer

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
$1.00 (green) - January 2, 1968
Globe Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
$1.00 (green) - January 2, 1968
Rand McNally

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
$1.00 (green) - January 1, 1974
Globe Ticket

collection of Philip M. Goldstein


NJTA Toll Scrip Issues Observed


1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985
.5
1955*
McNally









1965
McNally


1968
Globe

1970
McNally

1972
Globe
     

1976
National







.10
1955*
McNally












1968
Globe
1969
McNally
1970
McNally



1974
Globe
1975
National








.25
1955*
McNally











1967
Globe

1969
McNally
1970
McNally








1981
Globe



1985*
unmarked
.50


























1983
unknown


$1.00













1968
Globe
1969
McNally




1974
Globe









* = with Gov't Vehicles or Department of the Army overstamp.



NJTA Entry Card - Exit 4 / Camden / Philadelphia - Class 3 - 3 Axles 
Eastern Greyhound Lines
unknown date - marked 1951 through 1983

 616289 - Business Supplies Corp of America
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
Entry Card  - Exit 1 /
 Delaware Memorial Bridge - Class 1 (automobile)
unknown date
NECS / RTN-8350R3

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
Entry Card - Exit 4 /
Camden / Philadelphia - Class 1 (automobile) 
unknown date
NECS / RTN-8353R3

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
Entry Card - Exit 16W / Sports Plex / Secaucus -
Class 1 (automobile)
 unknown date

collection of Philip M. Goldstein


Entry Card - Exit 18W / Geo Washington Bridge -
Class 1 (automobile)
unknown date
NECS / RTN-8374R3

collection of Philip M. Goldstein


Entry Card - Exit 1 /
Delaware Memorial Bridge - Class 1 (automobile)
unknown date
CDI-151

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
Entry Card - Exit 18E / George Washington Bridge
Class 1
ca. 1976
IBM & Univac style holes - NECC / RTN 8373

collection of Douglas W. Jones
Entry Card - Exit 15W / Newark - The Oranges
Class 2 
 unknown date
IBM style holes -
NECC / RTN 8395
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
Entry Card - Exit 18E / George Washington Bridge
Class unknown
unknown date
Univac style holes - JP39752 BSC

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 10 / Edison / Metuchen - Class 1 
 unknown date

IBM Z45795
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 11 / Garden State Parkway - Class 1 
 unknown date

MTL
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 4 / Camden / Philadelphia - Class 1 
ca. January 1994?
MAG 1-94

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 8A / Jamesburg / Cranbury - Class 1 
 unknown date

MTL
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 16E / Lincoln Tunnel / NJ3 / Secaucus - Class 1 
 unknown date

EDM
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 13 / Elizabeth / Verrazano Narrows Bridge - Class 1 
unknown date
EDM

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 14C / Holland Tunnel - Class 1 
 unknown date

(Type 1 - all black ink on back, half tone NJTP logo)
EDM
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 14 / i-78 / Newark Airport - Class 1 
 unknown date

 (Type 2 - slightly bolder font, solid NJTP logo, black and red ink on back)
863624C
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 14C / Holland Tunnel - Class 1 
 unknown date

 (Type 2 - slightly bolder font, solid NJTP logo, black and red ink on back)
860757F
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 15W / I-280 - Newark - Class 1 
 unknown date

 (Type 2 - slightly bolder font, solid NJTP logo, black and red ink on back)
863625A
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
NJTA Entry Card - Exit 16W / NJ3 / Secaucus - Class 1 
 unknown date
 (Type 2 - slightly bolder font, solid NJTP logo, black and red ink on back)
863625D
collection of Philip M. Goldstein


New Jersey Turnpike Authority Trip Authorization Cards
Trip Authorization Cards for Account Holders - unknown date
Eastern Greyhound above
Hudson Transit below
If I understand this issue correctly, these were the equivalent of account passes for each company. When their vehicle exited the Turnpike,
the driver would turn over one of these cards along with the entry ticket, and the appropriate business account debited for the toll.

This allowed the bus to enter & exit numerous times along its journey
IBM punch system with magnetic stripe on back
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.

New Jersey Turnpike Authority Receipts
$1.50 - August 18, 1975
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
$1.75 - no date
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
$1.15 - no date
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
$1.30- August 8, 1982
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
Entry 10 to Exit 8A - .25 - 10/10/1984
(silvered thermal paper - dot matrix printing)

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
13 to 11 (words "Entry" & "Exit" removed)  - .35 - 3/8/1986
(silvered thermal paper - dot matrix printing)

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.
15W to 13  - .85 - 1/10/2000
collection of Philip M. Goldstein





BACK TO TOP OF PAGE / INDEX




Current New Jersey Turnpike Toll Schedules


   Because of the extensive nature of the New Jersey Turnpike Toll Schedules for cash, E-ZPass, peak and off-peak rates and for each of the toll classes: passenger autos, commercial trucks and buses, I am going to refrain from displaying all of them here. I will however provide a link to the NJTA website for each toll schedule as a convenience:

Class 1 - Passenger Car, 2 axles
Class 2 - 2 axle trucks
Class 3 - 3 axles trucks
Class 4 - 4 axle trucks
Class 5 - 5 axles trucks
Class 6 - 6 axle trucks
Class B2 - 2 axle buses
Class B3 - 3 axle buses





BACK TO TOP OF PAGE / INDEX








Garden State Parkway


   The Garden State Parkway is another limited access highway that runs throughout New Jersey, but unlike the New Jersey Turnpike it is open tolled, and as a parkway; it is restricted only to passenger cars and passenger buses and vehicles under 10,000 pounds g.v.w. (gross vehicle weight) for its portion north of Interchange 105 - NJ State Route 18 / Eatontown.

   South of this interchanges, commercial vehicles and trucks over 10,000 pounds g.v.w. are permitted.

   Most of the Garden State Parkway was originally planned in 1946 as a bypass of pre-1953 Route 4; which as planned was to run from Cape May in the south to the George Washington Bridge at the north, by way of Paterson.

   Also known as the Route 4 Parkway, construction began in 1947 in Union County. Due to a lack of funds however, only eleven miles of it were completed by 1950. This segment, between exits 129 and 140, can be distinguished by the stone facing on the overpasses. The solution was for the State of New Jersey to establish the New Jersey Highway Authority (NJHA) in 1952 to oversee construction and operation as a self-liquidating toll road from Cape May to the New York State line.

   The landscape architect and engineer in charge of the newly named Garden State Parkway was Gilmore David Clarke (of the engineering firm Parsons Brinckerhoff). Mr. Clarke had worked with Robert Moses on the parkway systems around New York City, and which explains some aesthetic similarities to other Moses' highway projects. Clarke's design prototypes for the parkway combined the example of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, a model of efficiency with parallels in the German Autobahn routes of the 1930s, with the Merritt Parkway model that stressed a planted "green belt" for beauty. Both design models featured wide planted medians to prevent head-on collisions and mask the glare of oncoming headlights.

   The Garden State Parkway was designed to have a natural "feel". Many trees were planted, and the only signs were those for exits - there were no distracting billboards. Most of the signs were constructed from wood, or a dark-brown metal, instead of the chrome bars used on most other highways. The guardrails were also made from wood and dark metal. Most early overpasses were stone, but were later changed to concrete, with green rails and retro etchings, popular around the 1950s and 1960s. The parkway was designed to curve gently throughout its length so that drivers would remain alert and not fall asleep at the wheel.


   The final portion of the parkway to open was from Paramus to the New York state line near Montvale. It was originally proposed, as part of a northern extension of Route 101, a highway that was intended to run from Kearny to Hackensack. The extension, Route S101, would have continued northward from Hackensack to the state line via Paramus.

   Route 101 was never built, and only the Paramus–Montvale segment saw any later construction. This segment of the parkway opened in 1957 along with the Garden State Parkway Connector of the New York State Thruway.

   New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey announced a proposal to consolidate the operating organizations of the Garden State Parkway and the New Jersey Turnpike into one agency, the New Jersey Turnpike Authority (NJTA).
This officially took place on July 9, 2003.

   The Garden State Parkway uses an open system of tolling where tolls are collected at somewhat regular intervals along its length and at certain entrances and exits. This contrasts with the New Jersey Turnpike, which uses a closed system where a motorist receives a ticket with the toll rates at the highway's entrance, and turns in the ticket along with the toll upon exiting at toll gates.

  The Garden State Parkway also has the distinction of being the first toll road to collect tolls automatically. The Toll Plaza in Union, NJ; was the location of the first ever automated toll collection device. There is a plaque installed by the Garden State Parkway commemorating this event, complete with the first quarter ever collected by an automated toll machine.

.

Coupons (Scrip) & Tokens

   The toll coupons for the Garden State Parkway are not quite as well known as the tokens, and usage dates are currently being researched. It appears the coupons were used prior to the tokens. The partial book of coupon I have in my collection and of which is seen below; contained 40 coupons for and cost $10.00. This of course works out to be .25 cent per coupon. Fortunately, the back of the book is stamped when it was sold March or May 15, 1965 and thus predates the first token issues in 1981.

   With some bit of irony, they bear the facsimile signature of D. Louis Tonti, who was the executive director of New Jersey Highway Authority. In 1971 he was indicted, and in 1973 he plead guilty, convicted and sentenced a three year prison term as well as fined $10,000 for conspiring to extort $120,000 from business concerns between 1965 and 1971 when he left the NJHA. 

   So, that pretty much tells us the coupons bearing his signature, did not bear his signature after 1971! 

   It appears the Garden State Parkway relied mostly on the tokens, which were available for purchase at full-service toll plaza lanes. 

   The first design of car tokens (Atwood Coffee NJ570A - seen below) which are 23mm in diameter, brass plated (they are slightly attracted to a magnet) and have following design features: outline of State of New Jersey and Garden State Parkway Car Token on one side; New Jersey Highway Authority around GSP on the other side which also carries the date 1952. 

   Contrary to the uninformed; they were not minted or used in 1952. 

  1952 is the date the New Jersey Highway Department was organized. Sort of like the Bicentennial Quarters everyone hoarded back in the 70's. While they carried the date 1776 - 1976, at least their true mintage date was obviously 1976 and no one believed they were from 1776!

   These brass plated tokens were minted in 1980 and released for circulation in 1981, almost three decades after the formation of the NJHA and the opening of the Garden State Parkway. They were offered for sale at a price of $10 for a roll of 40 tokens; as the toll was 25 cents at the time. But, because of the lack of discount, there was no incentive for their use and most drivers continued to use quarters. These tokens are somewhat more difficult to find in better grades, but a quick search of eBay reveals at least 2 or 3 available for sale at any given moment.  

   The bus version of this token, NJ570B, slightly larger at 26mm in diameter; were issued March 6, 1985.

   In 1989 the toll was increased to .35 cents, and new tokens were minted. These are the white metal tokens with brass bullseye center (NJ570C, NJ570D and NJ570E) seen below. These tokens are also slightly attracted to a magnet.

   Rolls of these tokens were priced at 30 tokens for $10 or 33.333 cents per token, a savings of just under 2 cents. With this slight discount and the convenience of using a single coin instead of two or more (a quarter and a dime or a combination of dimes and nickels or quarters and nickels), the tokens gained in popularity. There were also larger bus tokens, primarily for use by Atlantic City-bound buses. 

   There is a minor variety on the car tokens: those with a miniscule "OC" on them and those without. OC denotes Osborn Coinage, a token manufacturer. 

without "OC"
Atwood Coffee NJ570C
with "OC"
Atwood Coffee NJ570E

   As E-ZPass gained acceptance and its use more widespread, the tokens were phased out of use. Token sales were officially discontinued on January 1, 2002, and on January 1, 2009; they were no longer accepted at the tolls. 

   Approximately 53 million tokens were struck between 1981 and 2001. An estimated 20 million tokens were in the possession of New Jersey Highway Authority officials before the last roll was sold, and that more than half of the remaining 33 million have been collected and removed from circulation since January 2002.

   In a New York Time article dated July 20, 2008, it is estimated there are at least 16 million tokens worth an estimated $5,000,000 still in circulation, six years after the last roll was sold. 

   As the following two articles are pertinent to the token history, I have included them here.


courtesy of New York Times Digital archives

.


courtesy of American City & County digital archives

   

   Despite all the tokens collected and turned in for scrap; all varieties of the bullseye token are extremely common. There are hundreds of loose tokens available, individually and in large quantity lots, as well as some partial and intact rolls on eBay and other online shopping venues for sale every day.

   While I did not normally collect them, it has become very helpful to review the maps on eBay that were distributed by the various parkway agencies; as some issues carried up to date toll schedules for the year issued.

   Taking this 1967 example at right, we not only have the tolls for the parkway, but it gives us a clear description of the types of prepaid coupons that was available to the Garden State Parkway motorist.

   It also gives us insight as to the value of the scrip - no discount, just a prepaid coupon to purchase in advance for convenience.

   The map was paired a Burlington County Bridge Commission brochure of similar type with toll information.

   In my opinion, well worth the $6 (including shipping) for this information!

   So now we know, there were three different denominations of prepaid toll tickets and they were good until used:
  • .25 cent - 40 tickets for $10.00
  • .15 cent - 50 tickets for $7.50
  • .10 cent - 100 tickets for $10.00
   And, I am fortunate to own a partial book of the .25 tickets, which can be seen below:

Garden State Parkway Toll Coupons (Scrip)
Booklet of 40 coupons for $10.00 (25 cents each) - March or May 1965
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
25 cent coupon - ca. 1965
facsimile signature of D. Louis Tonti.

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.

Garden State Parkway Tokens
roll wrapper of car tokens (NJ570A?)
Wrapper also doubles as receipt for purchase of the roll.

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
.
roll wrapper of tokens (NJ570E?)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
.
complete roll of bus tokens (NJ570D) - ca. 1990
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
complete roll of bus tokens (NJ570C & NY570E) - ca. 1988
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Garden State Parkway Car Token - 1981
NJ570A - 23mm brass (plated - slightly magnetic)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Garden State Parkway Bus Token - 3/6/1985
NJ570B - 26mm brass (plated - slightly magnetic)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Garden State Parkway Car Token - ca. 1988
NJ570C - 23mm white metal with 8mm brass center 

(slightly magnetic)
no mintmark
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Garden State Parkway Bus Token - ca. 1990
NJ570D - 26mm white metal with 9mm brass center
(slightly magnetic)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Garden State Parkway Car Token - ca. ?
NJ570E - 23mm white metal with 8mm brass center
(slightly magnetic)
with "OC" Osborn Coinage mintmark
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein



Garden State Parkway Receipts
 10 cents - 1981?
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

 Bergen Spare 7 - 25 cents - 10/27/1984
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

Raritan North 7 - 25 cents - 4/27/1985
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

Saddlebrook 3 - 25 cents - 10/27/1984
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

.25 Asbury - 10/24/1986
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
 .25 - Asbury Park - 9/18/1979
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

.25 - Bergen - 10/25/1986
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.25 - Raritan North - 5/9/1984
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

 .25 - 8/21/ ?
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.

Current Garden State Parkway Toll Schedule






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New Jersey Expressway Authority


   Plans for a road connecting Camden and Atlantic City can be traced back to the 1930s, but was never built. Plans for the highway resurfaced in the 1950s when a group of officials led by State Senator Frank S. Farley, who pushed for highway to help the Atlantic City area economy. The New Jersey Expressway Authority was created in 1962, and was tasked with building the expressway. Between 1962 and 1965 the Atlantic City Expressway took shape and when completed, had a total cost of $48.2 million.

   In 1991, the South Jersey Transportation Authority assumed control of the road from the New Jersey Expressway Authority.

   Passenger vehicles currently must pay a $3.00 toll at the Egg Harbor Toll Plaza, which is located east of the Farley Service Plaza, and another toll of 75 cents toll near Pleasantville. Both mainline toll plazas have Express E-ZPass lanes through the center of the plaza. Tolls are also collected at several entrances and exits. Additionally, a 75 cent toll for cars is charged at the eastbound exits and westbound entrances at Exits 5, 28, and 33 and the westbound exits and eastbound entrances at Exits 9 and 12; in addition, a 40 cent toll for cars is charged at the eastbound Exits and westbound entrances at Exits 38 and 41. A $3.00 E-ZPass Only toll is charged for the westbound exit and eastbound entrance at Exit 17.

   Since 2014, eastbound tolls have been waived at the Egg Harbor Toll Plaza between 5:00 and 6:00 pm on Friday before Memorial Day to promote the unofficial beginning of the summer tourist season at the Jersey Shore. 

New Jersey Expressway Authority / Atlantic City Expressway Scrip
Prepaid Scrip - 25 cents for one bus (Class 6) - unknown date
with expedient overstamp for Class 5, 9 and 10 trucks with stamp
Good at Pleasantville Toll Plaza Only

WorthPoint / Google search
.

.
Prepaid Scrip - $1.00 for one bus or truck, Bus - Class 6, Truck - Class 5-9-10  - unknown date
Good at Egg Harbor Toll Plaza 
WorthPoint / Google search
.

.
Prepaid Scrip - 25 cents for all vehicles - unknown date
Good at Pleasantville & Mays Landing Toll Plazas - unknown date
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
..

.

Prepaid Scrip - 50 cents for 2 axle bus only - unknown date
Pleasantville Plaza only

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

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New Jersey Expressway Authority / Atlantic City Expressway Tokens
.
Atlantic City Expressway - One Fare - 1970
NJ710A - 26mm brass
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein

.

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Atlantic City Expressway - One Fare - Exact Change Lanes Only at Pleasantville Plaza - 1970
NJ710B - 26mm brass
Franklin Mint
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein

.

.
Atlantic City Expressway - ca. 1968
29mm - white metal
(same design on obverse and reverse)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)

collection of Philip M. Goldstein
 Atlantic City Expressway - ca. 1969
29mm - white metal with blue anodized center
(same design on obverse and reverse)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein






Current South Jersey Transportation Authority / Atlantic City Expressway Toll Schedule







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Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission


   The Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission (DRJTBC) is a bistate public agency that maintains and operates crossings connecting the U.S. states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey which cross the Delaware River.

   There is some discrepancy over when the DRJTBC first began. Wikipedia states on the Delaware River Port Authority webpage:

   "I
n 1919, Pennsylvania and New Jersey legislatures approved the creation of the Delaware River Bridge Joint Commission. The first meeting of this Joint Commission was held on December 12, 1919, with commissioners from both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. On July 1, 1926, the first bridge opened before a crowd of over 25,000 people. It was named the "Delaware River Bridge," and following the ceremony, over 100,000 people participated in the inaugural walk. United States President Calvin Coolidge came the next day to dedicate the bridge."

   However, the DRJTBC website states:

   "The Commission is one of the nation's oldest bi-state transportation companies. Its jurisdiction includes the site of the nation's first interstate bridge - the former Trenton Bridge, and a series of other crossings that were originally constructed in the 1800's as privately owned toll bridges. traffic in the Commission's first full year of operation in 1935 was slightly more than 20 million vehicles.

   The watershed event that gave rise for a reconstituted toll agency in 1925, when the Northhampton Street Bridge linking Easton, PA and Phillipsburg, NJ required major repairs.

   The legislative process to convert the predecessor commission into a toll agency began in 1931, but it was not completed until late 1934."


   The jurisdiction of the DRJTBC stretches roughly 140 miles along the Delaware River, from the New York / New Jersey State Line south to Philadelphia/Bucks County, PA. The DRJTBC currently operates eight toll bridges and twelve free bridges (two of which are pedestrian-only crossings) of which are subsidized utilizing the tolls of the eight tolled spans.

   Effective 1987, the DRJTBC has not received any state or federal tax revenues and relies solely on the toll collections of the eight toll spans for its financing. In 2019, more than 138 million cars and trucks used the DRJTBC's network of Delaware River bridge crossings.

   The DRJTBC was established on December 18, 1934 under legislation enacted in the two states of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The federal compact for the DRJTBC was first approved by Congress in 1935. This compact has been modified several times (on July 8, 1947, July 17, 1951, July 16, 1953, and March 19, 1986).

   In 1984 and 1985, the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey entered into the current version of the interstate compact, known as the "1984 agreement." This new compact was a substantial change to previous compacts, as the DRJTBC no longer would receive tax dollars to maintain the commissions' free (toll-supported) bridges, known as tax-supported bridges until that 1984 agreement.

   This meant that the DRJTBC accepted full financial responsibility for their toll-free bridges. Later revisions to the compact were also enacted so that the DRJTBC could construct the Interstate 78 Bridge over the Delaware River and subsequently operate it as a tolled crossing.

   A board of 10 commissioners govern the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, with five coming from each state respectively. In New Jersey, members are nominated by the New Jersey Governor and confirmed by the State Senate for three-year terms, while in Pennsylvania, five members are appointed by the Pennsylvania Governor and serve at his pleasure. The positions are unpaid. The commission meet on a monthly basis to review reports, provide oversight and set policies carried out by the Executive Director and professional staff.

   The eight toll bridges (from north to south) consist of the:

crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Milford - Montague BridgeUS 206steel deck trussDecember 30, 1953
Delaware Water Gap BridgeInterstate 80steel plate beamDecember 16, 1953
Portland - Columbia BridgeRoute 94 steel plate girderDecember 1, 1953
Easton - Phillipsburg BridgeUS 22modified steel Pennsylvania (Petit) truss bridgeJanuary 14, 1938
Interstate 78 BridgeInterstate 78concrete girderNovember 21, 1989
New Hope - Lambertville BridgeUS 202steel plate girderJuly 22, 1971
Scudder Falls BridgeInterstate 295steel plate girderJune 22, 1961 (original span)
July 10, 2019 (new span)
Trenton - Morrisville BridgeUS 1steel girderDecember 1, 1952
.

.


Toll Rates:

   This article was located online as SouthJersey.com website, but unfortunately it is not dated:


"Motorists who stocked up on tokens after hearing about steep toll increases scheduled for seven upper Delaware River bridges will be out of luck. The agency that runs the bridges won't accept the tokens once the fare hikes take effect, at the same time the E-ZPass electronic toll collection system is installed. That should happen sometime later this year, although exactly when hasn't been determined. Meanwhile, the agency has placed restrictions on token sales. The commission collects tolls on bridges that carry Routes 78 and 80 and Routes 1, 202, 22, 46 and 206 over the Delaware River. The amount varies from bridge to bridge. The commission also uses toll revenue to operate 13 free bridges over the river.

At $4 for a roll of 40, the tokens offer significant savings for drivers using them. A bridge charging a 50-cent cash toll now accepts two tokens instead, saving the driver 30 cents.

"People made the assumption that tokens would still be accepted as a form of payment," said Linda Spalinski, a spokeswoman for the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. "There was a huge run on tokens. People were hoarding them and we were in danger of running out."

Restrictions on token sales began about a month ago, and toll collectors have been handing out notices stating that sales are limited to one roll of 40 tokens per customer. Hours of sale also are limited to 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, and tokens also are no longer sold Saturdays and Sundays.

The situation is similar to the one that developed as the Garden State Parkway prepared to raise tolls in 1989. Then, too, motorists hoarded the tokens, and the New Jersey Highway Authority, which runs the toll road, had to ration sales of the discs.

The Parkway tokens have since been discontinued as well.

The bridge commission says the toll increases, which will raise the commission's annual revenues from $32 million to more than $100 million, are needed to pay for a $526 million capital improvement program, start a 37-officer bridge police force and create a $280 million reserve fund in case of terrorist attacks.

Increases will vary at various bridges and for different types of vehicles. For example, the toll for cars will double to $1 at the Interstate 78 bridge; at the Interstate 80 bridge, it will rise to $1.25 from $1. E-ZPass users will get a discount, but the new tolls will still be higher than what they pay now using cash or tokens.

Rodney Rufe will miss the tokens on his daily commute from Mt. Bethel, Pa., to North Warren Regional High School in Blairstown, where he is the principal.

Once in a while, Rufe said, one of the toll collectors would yell, "Hey, you're pretty late from work today."

"The tokens made it very personal," he told The Star-Ledger of Newark for Thursday's editions. "You may not know (the toll collector's) name but you know he's the guy that's there everyday. It's not going to be personal at all with the E-ZPass."

What we do know now is at $4 for a roll of 40, the tokens offer significant savings for drivers using them. A bridge charging a 50-cent cash toll now accepts two tokens instead, saving the driver 30 cents."



Historical Toll Rates
.

8/31/19559/1/1955 1<11/30/200212/1/2002 (westbound only)possible 2003 rollback?1/2004
cars.10.05.25, .50, $1.002.75 all bridges
$1.00$1.252
trucks$4.00$11.25$5 more
.
1
Toll rates reduced due to flood damaged free Easton - Phillipsburg Bridge.
2 NYT article mentions these tolls "depending on bridge" but doesn't state which bridge
.

.

   Current toll rates are as follows. It appears that the toll collected for the Scudder Falls Bridge has been kept higher than at the other seven other tolled crossings for some time. Why this is, is not known at this time.


.

.



Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission - Scrip

DRJTBC 40 trip Commutation Book - $1.00 - unknown date
Globe Ticket Company
tickets: 2" x 4"
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
DRJTBC Scrip - Three Axle Truck over 7 ½ tons - .40 - unknown date
Globe Ticket Company
2" x 4"
 WorthPoint / Google search
.

.
DRJTBC Scrip - Four Axle Truck over 7 ½ tons - .50 - unknown date
Globe Ticket Company
2" x 4"
WorthPoint / Google search
.

.
DRJTBC Scrip - Senior Citizen discount ticket - ca. 2000's
2" x 3 13/16"
collection of Philip M. Goldstein

..

.
Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission - Tokens

Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission - Bridge Token - 1970
PA263A - 20mm brass
Franklin Mint

(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission - Bridge Token - 1976
PA263A - 20mm brass
MEM emblem
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission - Bridge Token - 1976?
PA263C - 20mm brass
(no mintmark)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission - Bridge Token - 1995
PA263D - 20mm brass
(Commuter Token twice on reverse)
 (no mintmark)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein


.

   The following is a receipt issued by the DRJTBC:

Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission Receipt - Delaware Water Gap - July 16, 1995 - 5:49 AM
2 ¾" x 4 ¼"

collection of Philip M. Goldstein



   While the next item is not a true fiscal issue (used in paying the toll of crossing the bridge), it is a Commemorative Medallion issued upon the opening dedication of the "new" New Hope - Lambertville Toll Bridge. From what I was able to ascertain, the proof medallion were struck by the Franklin Mint for the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission for the dedication. This medallion is also known to have been struck in .925 pure silver.

Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission
 New Hope - Lambertville Bridge Opening - July 22, 1971
Opening Dedication Commemorative Medallion
proof struck copper - 1.50" diameter
(also struck in .925 silver)
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein











Delaware River Port Authority


   The Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA), officially the "Delaware River Port Authority of Pennsylvania and New Jersey," is a bi-state agency created by a Congressionally approved interstate compact between the governments of Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

   DRPA is principally charged to maintain and develop transportation links between the two states with four bridges, a ferry, and a mass transit rail line across the Delaware River. The four bridges under its jurisdiction are the:


crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Ben Franklin BridgeInterstate 676 / US 30suspensionJanuary 1, 1926
Betsy Ross BridgeRoute 90steel continuous trussApril 30, 1976
Commodore John Barry BridgeUS 322 / CR 536steel cantileverFebruary 1, 1974
Walt Whitman BridgeInterstate 76suspensionMay 16, 1967

   From Wikipedia: 

   "On July 17, 1951 United States President Harry S. Truman signed a bill, which created the Delaware River Port Authority. In 1953, construction started on a new bridge to connect South Philadelphia and Gloucester City. In 1955, the existing bridge was renamed Benjamin Franklin Bridge while the name Walt Whitman Bridge was approved for the new bridge which would open in 1957. By 1966, two more bridges were approved; the Commodore Barry Bridge (opened February 1, 1974) and the Betsy Ross Bridge (opened April 30, 1976). In 1974 and 1990, the Ben Franklin Bridge and the Walt Whitman Bridge carried their one-billionth vehicle, respectively.

   The Delaware River Port Authority is governed by 16 commissioners; eight commissioners each represent New Jersey and Pennsylvania. All eight New Jersey commissioners are appointed by the Governor of New Jersey, and six Pennsylvania commissioners are appointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Treasurer and the Pennsylvania Auditor General serve as ex officio commissioners. These two officers are elected officials.

Tolling

Historical Toll Rates
.
<5/19536/19532/1/19684/1/19721/1/197311/1/197412/2/197512/1/1977unknown dateca. 1986<1/1/20001/2/2000
Passenger Automobile.20.25.50.60.50.60.55no tolls .75.90$2.00$3.00
Commuter Rate.35.40 collected 
Carpool Rate (3+ persons)n/a.2510 pm - 6 am 
40 Trip Commutation Book$7.50on Betsy Ross
Passenger Automobile and Trailer.40 Bridge.
Passenger Bus.50Unknown
Motorcycle.15what date
Horse or Horse Drawn Vehicle (Ben Franklin Bridge only).30this 
Truck: 7,000 pounds gross weight .25policy
7,001 to 19,000 pounds gross weight.50was
19,001 to 30,000 pounds gross weight.75repealed.
30,001 to 36,000 pounds gross weight$1.00
36,001 to 40,000 pounds gross weight $1.50
Trucks in excess of 40,000 pounds gross weight,
when permitted, for the the first 40,000 pounds
$1.50
For each additional 2,000 pounds, or fraction thereof,
of such gross weight in excess of 40,000 pounds
.25
Truck and Trailer
of a combined gross weight not exceeding 19,000,
regardless of axle count
.50
Tractor and Trailer to 60,000 pounds gross weight with:
2 axles
$1.00
3 axles$1.20
4 axles$1.60
5 axles$2.00
Trucktractor or Truck Chassis -
7,000 pounds vehicle weight
.25
7,001 to 19,000 pounds vehicle weight.50
19,001 to 30,000 pounds vehicle weight.75
Special Permit (60,001 pounds and upward
Permit Fee Required
$10.00
In addition to the first 36,000 pounds1.00
For each additional 2,000 pounds, or fraction thereof in excess of 36,000 pounds.25

1 - Court ordered roll back

Current Toll Rate - Effective 7/1/2011
Passenger vehicles, including motorcycles & small trucks
7,000 lbs. and less gross vehicle weight (Class 1 & 2)
$5.00
Extra axles for autos (each)$3.75
Buses - per axle $3.75
2-axle$7.50
3-axle$11.25
Trucks, mobile homes and recreation vehicles-
gross vehicle weight 7,001 lbs. and up per axle
$7.50
2 axles$15.00
3 axles$22.50
4 axles$30.00
5 axles$37.50
6 axles$45.00
Extra axles for trucks (each)$7.50


   Tolling is changed from bi-directional to westbound only October 1, 1992.



Delaware River Port Authority - Scrip
Truck - $2.50 - unknown date
Globe Ticket Company

WorthPoint / Google search
.

.
Tractor & Trailer - 3 axles - $1.20 - post 1963
(Executive Director Paul McMurray)
Globe Ticket Company

WorthPoint / Google search
.

.
Tractor & Trailer - 4 Axles - $1.60 - post 1963
(Executive Director Paul McMurray)
Globe Ticket Company
WorthPoint / Google search
.

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Tractor & Trailer - 5 Axles - $2.00 - post 1963
(Executive Director Paul McMurray)
Globe Ticket Company

WorthPoint / Google search


Delaware River Port Authority - Tokens
Walt Whitman Bridge - 1971
NJ115H - 25mm - brass
Franklin Mint
(shown larger than actual size for detail - same design on obverse / reverse)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein
.

.
Delaware River Port Authority - 1973
NJ115I - 27mm - white metal
(shown larger than actual size for detail - same design on obverse / reverse)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein





BACK TO TOP OF PAGE / INDEX






.
Delaware River & Bay Authority

Delaware River Memorial Bridge



   The Delaware Memorial Bridge is actually a pair of twin suspension bridges crossing the Delaware River. These bridges carry Interstate 295 and US Route 40 between Newcastle, Delaware; and Pennsville, New Jersey. The bridges were designed with engineer Othmar Ammann consulting.

   With the opening of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in Philadelphia, residents of the States of Delaware and New Jersey began to advocate for a crossing of the Delaware River in the vicinity of Wilmington, Delaware. Commercial pressures mounted as well, as a ferry service instituted in 1926 as an interim measure, and this ran near the spans current location. Those advocating for the bridge faced strong opposition from the Philadelphia Port Authorities. Their claim was that the bridge hinder to navigation to vessels. Likewise, the US Navy and Coast Guard also showed concern that the bridge could be vulnerable to an enemy attack, and if collapsed into the river, it could render the Philadelphia Navy Yard unusable for an extended period of time.

   With vehicular traffic increased rapidly, the advantages of a bridge became evident. Construction was finally authorized by the highway departments of Delaware and New Jersey in 1945. Originally, a two lane highway tunnel was also considered, but the costs for a four lane bridge was found to be equivalent in price and therefore the four-lane bridge design was chosen. Congress approved the bridge project on July 13, 1946, and its construction began on February 1, 1949.

   The entire project cost $44,000,000 dollars, and construction took two years to complete the 175 feet high span with the towers reaching 440 feet above water level. The first span opened to traffic on August 16, 1951, and at the time was the sixth-longest main suspension span in the world. The Governor of Delaware, Elbert N. Carvel, and the Governor of New Jersey, Alfred E. Driscoll, dedicated the bridge to the deceased war veterans incurred from World War II from each state.

   The crossing quickly proved to be a popular travel route when the New Jersey Turnpike connection was completed at its north end. By 1955, nearly 8,000,000 vehicles were utilizing the bridge each year, nearly twice the original projection. By 1960, the span was carrying more than 15,000,000 cars and trucks per year. In November 1963, this number increased further when the bridge was connected to the new Delaware Turnpike which is designated as Interstate 95. 

   With rapidly increasing traffic counts, construction of a second span began in mid-1964, 250 feet north of the original span. At a cost of $77,000,000 dollars, the second span of the Delaware Memorial Bridge opened on September 12, 1968.

Second Span

   This span was dedicated to those fallen soldiers from Delaware and New Jersey that had been killed as a result of the Korean and Vietnam Wars. 

   With the opening of the second span to traffic, the first span span was closed for fifteen months for refurbishment: its suspending cables were replaced and its deck and median barrier were removed and replaced with a single deck to allow four undivided lanes of traffic to flow in the same direction. The first span reopened on December 29, 1969. With all eight lanes of the Delaware Memorial Bridge Twin Span opened to traffic, made it the world's second longest twin suspension bridge.

   The first suspension span carries northbound traffic for Interstate 295, whereas the newer span carries the southbound traffic. Crossover lanes on each side of the bridge can allow for two-way traffic on one span if the other has to be closed for an extensive period of time. 

   While they bear similarities in basic appearance, major design differences can be observed between the original and second spans as technology advance between the two eras of construction. While the first span was constructed of riveted steel plates, it also has an open-grate shoulder access walk. In contrast, the second span was constructed mostly of welded steel plates (with heavy riveted joints in crucial areas) and it has concrete access walks.

   The bridge did have a close call with disaster when on July 9, 1969, the oil tanker "Regent Liverpool" struck the fender system protecting the tower piers. The bridge itself was spared damage, but the fender suffered significant damage, and repairs totaled about $1,000,000 dollars.

   The bridges are a lasting memorial to those fallen soldiers who gave their lives in World War II, the Korean Conflict, Vietnam and Operation Desert Storm. Each year on Veterans Day, a special ceremony is held at the Bridge War Memorial, which overlooks the Twin Spans.

Tolling

   One-way tolls for traffic entering Delaware (westbound) were instituted in January 1, 1953.

   As of May 1, 2019, about $270,000 in tolls are collected daily. The DRBA has originally proposed to raise the toll from $4.00 to $5.00 on March 1, 2019, however New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy vetoed this plan on January 3, 2019. In February, the DRBA and the governors of Delaware and New Jersey reached an agreement which postponed the toll hike to May 1, as well as providing a 25 cent E-ZPass discount for passenger vehicles. The frequent traveler rate increased from $1.25 to $1.75.

   Prior to the introduction of E-ZPass, both tokens and frequent traveler tickets were used, with special, discounted ticket books for local residents. They were phased out upon the introduction of the new system, and the tokens are no longer valid. 



Historical Toll Rates

vehicle descriptionaxles8/16/19511/1/19536/1/195812/31/19597/1/196319685/1/2019
Passenger Cars (All Types)  
Including:  All four tire types: Vans, Pick-Ups, Motorcycles
2.75.75.50.25.50.50$5.00
Book of 20 accommodation tickets
good until used
2$15.00
(.75 per trip)
$10.00
Passenger Cars (E-ZPass)
Available to NJ E-ZPass and DE E-ZPass service center account holders only
2n/an/an/an/an/an/a$4.75
Special Commutation Tickets "Shopper"
book of 10 tickets good for one calender month,
passenger cars only
2$3.50
(.35 per trip)
$2.50
Commutation Tickets
book of 50 good for one month only, passenger cars only
2$12.50
(.25 per trip)
$7.50$5.00
Commutation Tickets
book of 20 good for two months only, passenger cars only
2$4.00
Commuter
E-ZPass plan type: 22 trips valid for 30 days
2.10.20$27.50
(1.25 per trip)
Frequent Traveler "Shopper"
E-ZPass plan type: 20 trips valid for 90 days
2.20.35$35.00
(1.75 per trip)
Passenger Car with one axle trailer3$1.00$7.50
Passenger Car with two axle trailer4$10.00
Passenger Car with three axle trailer5$12.50
Two Axle Trucks
including six tire types, Buses & Tractors, RV's and
Dual Tire Pick Up Trucks
2$1.00$1.00$.50.75$12.00
Book of 20 accommodation tickets2$20.00$15.00
Three Axle Trucks or Combination Tractor / Trailer,
Buses (all three axles types) RV's
3$1.50$1.00$21.00
Book of 20 accommodation tickets3$30.00
($1.50 per trip)
$20.00
Four Axle Trucks or Combination
Including Tractors or Combination Tractor / Trailer
4$2.00$1.50$28.00
Book of 20 accommodation tickets4$40.00
($2.00 per trip)
$30.00
Five Axle Trucks or Combination
Including Tractors or Combination Tractor / Trailer
5$2.50$1.75$35.00
Book of 20 accommodation tickets$35.00
Six Axle Trucks or Combination
Any combination of axles amounting to six
6$3.00$42.00
Seven Axle Trucks or Truck Combination$3.50
Specials (over 6 axles)
any combination of axles greater than six
per axle$7.00
Wide Loads / Permit Vehicles
Any overwidth vehicle (10' or more)
$5.00$85.00
non-revenue vehicles
bridge maintenance, funeral processions, ambulance, fire & police - pass required
var.no charge





Delaware River & Bay Authority - Delaware Memorial Bridge

Delaware Memorial Bridge - 1/1/1991
DE700A - 28mm - bimetal (brass & magnetic white metal)
Roger Williams Mint - 1,000,047 pieces struck
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein

.

   
.

   The following is a non-toll use Souvenir Token issued for the Delaware Memorial Bridge. They are commonly seen, but nothing is known about them. They might have been issued as a premium from a gasoline refiner (Shell, Exxon, Sunoco, etc). The refiners often had a series of tokens manufactured each year featuring different topics: antique automobiles, places of interest, presidents, etc; and if you purchased a set amount of gasoline each week, you got a token. It kept the customer coming back to the same brand of gasoline or chain of gasoline stations to collect the entire set. Depending on the topic, there could be dozens of tokens to each set.

   But, in short; this was not used to pay a toll or used to cross the bridge.


25.4mm (1 inch) aluminum - date unknown
(shown larger than actual size for detail)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein



BACK TO TOP OF PAGE / INDEX







County Operated Toll Bridges




   There are several toll bridges in the State of New Jersey, that are operated at the County / Township level.
.

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Burlington County Bridge Commission
   
   The Burlington County Bridge Commission, which operates the following toll bridges on the New Jersey / Pennsylvania state border in the vicinity of Philadelphia:

crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Tacony - Palmyra BridgePA Route 73 and NJ Route 73steel tied arch bridge with bascule openingAugust 14, 1929
Burlington - Bristol BridgePA Route 413 and NJ Route 413steel truss vertical liftMay 2, 1931
.

   
When first opened, both bridges were privately owned, and the toll was .25 cents to cross with a vehicle. This was a significant amount in that day, and yet the toll was raised to .35 cents for automobiles in 1931. It was not until 1948 when the Burlington County Bridge Commission purchased the two bridges and began lowering the toll rates to an amount more reasonable for the everyday driver and upon retiring the bonds sold for the purchase. Eventually, the toll plunged to a mere nickel proving very popular with drivers but not so much with the competing Delaware River Port Authority with their four bridges to the immediate south, and higher tolls. The tolls for the BCBC still remain at a lower rate than the DRPA Bridges, even to this day.
.
Historical Toll Rates
.
1935...194811950...1/1/1953...12/1/19542...1971...7/1/1975
...ca. 1981 - 1989>...< 2/28/2000...3/1/2000
cashcashvehicle typecashvehicle typecashcashcashcashcashcash
.35.30.25Automobile.25Automobile.05.05.10.25$1.00$2.00
Utility Trailer.15Utility Trailer.05.05
.50House Trailer.25House Trailer.05.05 - .25
.15Motorcycle.15Motorcycle.05.05

Bicycle.05.05
Bus.50Bus.25.25
Trucks (registered gross weight)
up to 7,000 pounds
.25Trucks up to 7,000 pounds.05.05
up to 19,000 pounds.507,001 to 21,000 pounds.25.25
under 30,000 pounds.7521,001 to 33,000 pounds.40.40
over 30,000 pounds1.0033,000 to 40,000 pounds.50.50
over 30,000 pounds 
(night rate 9pm - 8am)
.75 Tractor - Trailers:
Burlington Bridge
(up to 40,000 pound
gross weight)
.50.50
flatbed machinery trailers - empty$1.00 Tractor - Trailers:
Palmyra Bridge
(up to 60,000 pound
gross weight)
.50.50
notes:
$5.00Automobile Commutation Tickets
30 day / 25 trip
$5.00Truck and trailer combinations will be charged as two separate units.
Rates for special units on application
Truck Tickets may be purchased at either bridge office. Books of Truck Tickets may be purchased by mail at cost plus 45 cents (30 cents for insurance and 15 cents for a return receipt, plus 4 cents per book for postage and handling.
For example it would cost $50.85to purchase by mail10 books of tickets for trucks 7,001 to 21,000 lbs,gross weight.
Notes:
1 In 1948, the Burlington County Bridge Commission (composed of three men) purchased the Burlington-Bristol Bridge Company (Tacony - Palmyra and Burlington - Bristol Bridges) as part of a $12.4 million bond issue, and lowered the car toll to 30 cents (and later to 25 cents). All tolls went toward paying off the bond issues. 
2 In 1952, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled in Driscoll v. Burlington County Bridge Co., 86 A.2d 201 (N.J. 1952) that the purchase of the bridges was illegal, and ordered the return of $3 million in profit earned since 1948. Subsequently, the Burlington County Bridge Commission lowered the toll on the bridge to a nickel.



Current Toll Rates
(September 15, 2015)

.
vehicle typeClasscashE-ZPass
Passenger Car, Van, Motorcycle, Light Truck1$4.00$3.00
Two Axle Bus / RV / Standard Dual Wheel Pick Up truck2$6.00$5.00
Three Axle Bus / RV3$9.00$8.00
Additional Axles being pulled by Class 1, 2, 34$3.00$2.00
Two Axle Truck5$12.00$12.00
Three Axle Truck6$18.00$18.00
Four Axle Truck7$24.00$24.00
Five Axle Truck8$30.00$30.00
Six Axle Truck$36.00$36.00
Additional Axles being pulled by Class 5, 6, 7, 89$6.00$6.00


Burlington County Bridge Commission - Scrip
.
Truck capacity up to 72,000 pounds gross - .50 - ca. 1986?
Elliott Ticket Company

WorthPoint / Google search







.

 
Cape May County Bridge Commission

   The Cape May County Bridge Commission operates these toll bridges between Atlantic City and Cape May:

crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Townsends Inlet BridgeCR 619bascule1939
Middle Thorofare BridgeCR 619 / Ocean DrivebasculeJune 1940
Ocean City-Longport BridgeOcean DriveScherzer rolling lift
concrete beam
1927 (purchased 1946)
2002
Grassy Sound BridgeCR 619 / West Ocean DriveStrauss bascule1950
Corson's Inlet Bridge CR 619double-intersection Warren pony truss (arched top chord) swing
bascule
1946
built unknown year
Beesleys Point BridgeUS 9double leaf bascule1928
acquired 2008 (in closed state)
demolished 2013 (see below)

   

   The Beesleys Point Bridge was originally privately owned, and it carried US Route 9 over Great Egg Harbor. this bridge was about 300 yards to the west of and ran parallel to, the Garden State Parkway. The Beesleys Point Bridge was closed 2004. In 2006
, Hurricane Ernesto which hit the area; made Cape May County officials nervous because they now lacked the use of the bridge as an additional evacuation route.

   Due to the cost of rehabilitation, and the lack of finances of the
Beesleys Point Bridge Company to effect such rehabilitation, the Cape May County Bridge Commission purchased the bridge in December 2008 for the token sum of $1, with the intent of rehabilitating it and reopening it in 2012. 

   The NJDOT also announced a plan to fund a project to rehabilitate the bridge to at least 2019 in their Statewide Transportation Program 2011-2019.

   Officials of Cape May County then stated that the bridge rehabilitation would begin in mid-2010 and it was anticipated that the bridge would reopen to vehicular traffic in 2012 However following an inspection on June 28, 2010, revealed that a previous crack in the existing roadway deck had turned into a three-foot hole, and several other cracks in the road had the waters below the bridge visible through the opening. 

   Several more engineering studies had been put forth for the rebuilding, but in the end; Cape May County engineers concluded that even with significant rehabilitation, it would only extend the life of the span and causeway for only another 15 years. Therefore, is was not deemed worth the expense.

   On February 22, 2011, at the Seventh Annual Cape May County Transportation Infrastructure Conference, it was formally announced that the bridge and causeway would be demolished. Demolition of the bridge would began in July 2013 in conjunction with a project that will also replace the parallelling Great Egg Harbor Bridge of the Garden State Parkway.

   Adding insult to injury, on the evening of September 6, 2016; the drawbridge tenders cabin and drawbridge decking of the Beesleys Point Bridge caught fire. Firemen from Marmora VFD were unable to reach the blaze as contractors had already removed the causeways on either side of the bridge, and the fire department had to request mutual aid from other township's fireboats and the Coast Guard.

   This was just another nail in the coffin and on November 18, 2016 that last section of the bridge was demolished. 

.

Tolling

   
photo by Doug Kerr
   While researching the matter of tolls on this crossing, I located an image of the toll sign for the Beesley's Point Bridge on the 'web, seen at left.

   Strangely, it shows different rates were charged not only based on the axle count or size of the vehicle as most tolled crossings do; but also charged based on the commodity. A concrete truck ($3.50) paid less than a gasoline truck ($4.50), yet a concrete truck weighed significantly more than a gasoline truck; so obviously this was not a weight based tolling system either.


   When one considers that cement trucks are built substantially heavier than a fuel truck, logically so as concrete weighs substantially more than gasoline or fuel oil, even empty the concrete truck weighs more. One cannot help but wonder why that toll schedule was the way it was.

   One also has to wonder how superfluous these rates really were, as another sign on the bridge (seen at right) reflects the bridge and roadway having a 10 foot maximum width and a 12 ton (24,000 lb) weight limit, yet the sign at left lists the toll for a 6 axle truck!

photo by Doug Kerr
   Also to be taken into consideration, is the repeatedly stated condition of the bridge throughout the early 2000's. I think it can be safely said most trucks in the 4, 5 and 6 axle classes would not use the bridge frequently, if at all.

   It is also stated that it was anticipated when the bridge reopened in 2012, the toll would be $1.50, and would be charged one way, (equivalent to 75 cent each way). The $1.50 would also equal that of the Garden State Parkway.

   It is mentioned in a Cape May County Herald article dated December 30, 2008, as stated by Cape May County Board Freeholder Director Daniel Beyel:

"In the last year of its operation, some 2 million cars crossed the bridge. At that time, its toll was 35 cents each way, while the Parkway toll was 30 cents;"

   Yet we clearly see in the image the sign on the bridge that shows self adhesive numerals over the previous automobile toll, and now showing 60 cents. It remains to be discovered if a toll hike took place in the last weeks or months of the bridges operation.









Private Bridge Companies / Operators (!)

   Most surprisingly, to me anyway; is that there are also not one, but TWO privately operated toll bridge companies and operators in the State of New Jersey. There were actually three up until 2004!

   The first of these privately operated toll bridges is located in the northwest corner of the state:

Dingman's Choice and Delaware Bridge Company

crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Dingman's Ferry BridgeUS 209 / PA 739
Phoenix wrought iron truss1900

   

   This crossing is operated by the Dingman's Choice and Delaware Bridge Company. From Wikipedia:

   "The toll for automobiles is $1.00. Books of 40 tickets can be purchased from the toll collector for $30.00 as of April 20, 2015. This effectively lowers the toll to 75 cents if the entire book is used. Bicyclists may cross for free, but pedestrians are not allowed due to the narrow lanes. An 11-foot height restriction coupled with a weight restriction of four tons precludes large RVs and trucks from crossing. Although the bridge is within the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, government employees pay the toll, unless responding to an emergency with lights and sirens on. The bridge is the only fixed-crossing that charges a toll to enter New Jersey.

   The bridge's toll booth, located on the Pennsylvania side, is staffed by a single toll collector who stands in between the two lanes of traffic, collecting toll fees by hand. Christmas Day is the only day of the year on which the toll booth is unattended; everyone may cross for free.

   Because the Bridge Company is responsible for its own repairs, it employs an engineering firm certified for bridge inspection to regularly and thoroughly inspect the bridge from the tops of the trusses to the underwater foundations. Each year, the bridge company closes the bridge the second week after Labor Day to conduct any repairs needed to maintain the structural integrity of the bridge and to replace or flip the salt-treated British Columbia fir planks. These floor boards are held in place with anchor plates and collar nails which results in a characteristic rattling of the deck with the traffic moving."

Dingmans' Ferry Toll Bridge - Historical and Current Toll Rates

< 2003 >5/1/2012
vehicle descriptioncash tollprepaid
tickets
cash toll
BicyclesFREE
Passenger Cars, SUVs, Small Vans, Pickups w/ 4 tires & Motorcycles.75.50 $1.001 ticket
above vehicles with trailer$2.002 tickets
Other vehicles within weight limit$2.002 tickets
above vehicles with trailer$3.003 tickets
Wreckers with car in tow$3.00 3 tickets
Books of 40 tickets are offered for sale at the toll house (effective 4/20/2015)$30.00

Weight Limit: 4 Tons
Height Limit: 11 Feet
Receipts available on request.
No pedestrians allowed
.
Buses and tractor trailers prohibited.

Flatbed wreckers with car on bed prohibited.

Steep penalties for vehicles that exceed the maximum height or weight limits:

Any vehicles that exceed the maximum weight of 4 tons, or the maximum height of 11 feet,
will be charged a penalty of $50.00 for the first offense and $100 for any subsequent offenses.








Downbeach Express / Margate Bridge


   The next private bridge operating company in New Jersey, is the Downbeach Express Corp. / Ole Hansen & Sons, which operates the Margate Bridge.

crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Margate BridgeCR 563
Scherzer rolling lift1929
rehabilitated 1985
   

   With information gleaned from the Bridgehunter website and other sources I can put forth the following history:

   The Margate Bridge was built in 1929 by Ole Hansen and his crew while in the employ of F. W. Schwiers & Company. The owner maintained the bridge for many years until it faced financial difficulties. As a result, the drawbridge was kept in open (lifted) position for seven years (1932 to 1939) so as not to be a hindrance to maritime traffic. The bridge did not operate, because there were not enough cars to pay for maintenance of the span or the machinery.

   Until 1963, I have not located any mention of the bridge, but during this year the Hansen family along with another local family, the Capaldi's; formed the Margate Bridge Company and purchased the two-mile causeway and four bridges from the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The causeway consisted of of three fixed spans and one double-leaf operable span

   The bridge is now managed by Ole Hansen & Sons, Inc. (OHS) and a full-time crew employed by OHS Inc.; handles all maintenance and repairs. The multi-span toll bridge system is part of the Intracoastal Waterway System that offers boaters ocean-free travel between the Canadian border and Florida. The bridge connects the towns of Margate and Northfield is one of only three privately owned toll bridges in the State of New Jersey.

   In 2003, OHS, Inc.; installed a new toll collection system that used a pre-paid automated toll card. The system called "Quick Toll Card" (QTC) improved the convenience and efficiency of the bridge for its regular patrons.

   The company re-branded the Margate Bridge as "Downbeach Express" in 2012 and installed a new toll system the "Express Pass", that provides better convenience, better efficiency which results in greater savings to its users.

   As per an article published in the October 11, 2012 edition of the Press of Atlantic Beach:

"Cash tolls will remain $1.50, but while drivers currently have to buy a minimum $120 card for 100 trips at $1.20 per trip, or $70 for 50 trips at $1.40 a trip, the new Express Pass will allow drivers to purchase a card at a minimum of $50 for a standard $1.20-a-trip toll for every card.

“We’re doing away with the $1.40 toll,” Ole Hansen President Dave Goddard said. “It’s either cash at $1.50 or $1.20 with the Express Pass.”

The reduced minimum for the cards, he said, “gives the ability for more people to access the Express Pass. All you have to do is open an account for $50. When it gets down to $15, you would be notified, or you could set up an auto-replenish to automatically charge your credit card, safe and secure.”

   I have assembled the following tabulation which will be filled in as further information is located.


Downbeach Express (Margate Bridge) - Historical and Current Toll Schedule 
11/24/2003200510/11/20124/18/20166/3/2019 (Current)
vehiclecashcashcashExpress Pass
"QTC"
cashExpress Pass
"QTC"
cashExpress Pass 
"QTC"
Motorcycles$2.00$1.40
Class 1 - up to 6,000 lbs$1.00$1.50$1.20$1.75$1.30$2.00$1.40
Class 2 - 6,001 to 10,000 lbs$2.50$2.10
Class 3 - 10,001 lbs to 15,000 lbs$3.25$2.60
Class 4 - 15,001 lbs to 20,000 lbs$3.75$3.10
Any vehicle with trailers$1.00$1.00
.


Margate Bridge - One Fare - 1979
NJ465B - 20mm brass (obverse same as reverse)
collection of Philip M. Goldstein



.

Beesley's Point Bridge

.

crossing namehighway routespan typedate opened
Beesleys Point BridgeUS 9double leaf bascule1928 - closed 2004, demolished 2013

   Built by the Ocean City Automobile Club in 1927 which was the third private toll bridge operator in New Jersey, as well as being the second private bridge operated in the Margate area was the Beesley's Point Bridge. When completed in 1928, control of the bridge was acquired by the Beesley's Point Bridge Company.

New York Times Digital Archives

.

.

   One can only imagine the loads of illegal alcoholic imbibements that was trucked over this span and the Margate Bridge, as well as the clientele; during Prohibition for Enoch L. "Nucky" Johnson, the entrepreneur extraordinaire and undisputed "boss" of Atlantic City.

   It also bears noting that this bridge originally carried the Garden State Parkway over the Great Egg Harbor Bay from the Parkway's opening in 1954 until the actual Garden State Parkway span over the bay, the Great Egg Harbor Bridge; opened a year later. So that is yet another reason for inclusion on this page.

   In 1997, the Beesley's Point Bridge Company, in conjunction with private outside investors, secured a $1 million loan from the New Jersey Department of Transportation to fund the necessary improvements in exchange for a promise that they would continue to keep the bridge open until 2016. 

   Unfortunately however, in 2004; the owners of the bridge broke that promise, realizing that the repairs would cost many times more than the original estimate. As a result, the company agreed to close the bridge and it closed to traffic on June 18, 2004. US 9 was subsequently rerouted over the Garden State Parkway Great Egg Harbor Bridge to the immediate east.

   As the bridge was in a dilapidated condition but yet deemed to be a potential hurricane evacuation route, it was purchased by the Cape May County Bridge Commission. 

   The bridges history after this purchase, is continued in the chapter above under the Cape May County Bridge Commission.

.

Tolls

   As noted in the New York Times Article dated 1928, the toll for the Beesleys Point Bridge was .25 cents for automobiles weighing less than a ton and half, and up to .75 cents for the heaviest trucks. 

   This .25 cent for automobiles is mentioned again in the 1972 article, but it is currently unknown if the toll rates changed between 1972 and the time of sale to the Cape May County Bridge Commission in 2004 it was 60 cents.

   As you note on the following ticket, it lists both the Beesley's Point Bridge as well as the Margate Bridge, so apparently there had been some reciprocal agreement on redemption of these tickets, in lieu of the fact that the bridges being operated by two separate companies.

Ocean City Automobile Bridge Co. - ca. 1935- 1955
Single Trip for Truck over Beesley's Point or Margate Bridge

collection of Philip M. Goldstein


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all text & images: © 2020 Philip M. Goldstein ~ www.nyctollscrip.info
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