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New York New Jersey Rail

INDUSTRIAL & OFFLINE TERMINAL RAILROADS
OF BROOKLYN, QUEENS, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX & MANHATTAN:


NEW YORK NEW JERSEY RAIL
Brooklyn, NY & Greenville, NJ

..&..

PORT JERSEY RAILROAD
Greenville, NJ

Port Authority of New York New Jersey PANYNJ

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updated:
TUESDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 2014 - 18:20


update summary: date: location
GMTX 2200, 2202 & 2213 leased locomotives added
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Carfloat #278 added

Freight traffic commences at Sims Recycling / South Brooklyn Marine Terminal
18 February 2014 Locomotive Overview & Liveries
Locomotive Roster
Marine Equipment
South Brooklyn Marine Terminal

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The collection of images on this website, which continues to grow; is due to the unprecedented and selfless contributions of the current owners of photo archives.

These people made their generous contributions to this website in good will, and allowed me to post their images online for the entire railroading community to view and appreciate, in admiration of these Fallen Flag Railroads.

In return, I strongly request that you please respect the ownership copyrights on those said images.

Other than that, please enjoy the history, thanks for taking the time to visit, and don't forget to sign the guestbook on the main page! 

~ Phil

As this particular webpage deals with an active railroad, viewers should be aware that:

this webpage or the author is not affiliated with:
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New York New Jersey Rail, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, South Brooklyn Railway, New York City Transit Authority, Metropolitan Transit Authority, City of New York, New York City Economic Development Corporation; South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, Axis Group, Davidson Pipe Supply Company, or Costco Wholesale Corporation;

or any of their subsidiaries, holding companies or parent organizations, employees or otherwise;
and no affiliation or connection with those companies or municipalities is suggested or implied.

This website and the information contained within has been compiled for the use of reference only, and any inaccuracies are purely accidental.
This webpage sees revision for the purpose of the addition of information, or correction of inaccurate data.

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INDEX

Overview

History

Ongoing Projects,
Capital Improvement Updates

Properties & Locations of Operations

Operations Videos

Special Movements.

Hurricane Sandy Damage
October 26, 2012
Return to Service in 52 Days!
December 21, 2012

Locomotive Overview & Liveries

Locomotive Photos

Locomotive Roster
Marine Equipment
Photos & Roster
Non Revenue Equipment
Overview, Photos & Roster

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Overview

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   In 2006, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad (in name) ceased operation. Following a change of ownership and administrative personnel, the operation would be renamed New York New Jersey Rail, LLC; but carfloating would continue to be part of New York Harbor.

   Now, just a short 5 years later; a lot of history is involved. Regardless of the change of name, it is the last railroad to utilize carfloating operations in New York Harbor!

   If you are interested in the in depth history of Offline Terminal / Common Carrier Railroads that make up the 100 year predecessor history of the New York New Jersey Rail, please read the pages on: Bush Terminal, New York Dock, and New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

RETURN TO INDEX


History

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New York New Jersey Rail

   In 2006, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad would officially become a "Fallen Flag". A new company: Mid Atlantic New England Rail, LLC; based out of West Seneca, NY; had purchased and assumed control of New York Cross Harbor Railroad. At this time it had the operation renamed to "New York New Jersey Rail, LLC". Nevertheless, the carfloating operation continued, as it was at that point essentially nothing more than a "name change and a paper shuffle".

   Ironically, this Mid Atlantic New England Rail ownership did not last long, because in November of 2008, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey announced that they had purchased New York New Jersey Rail.

   The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey (PANYNJ for short) is a bi-state government agency dating it roots back to 1921. It administers to and oversees all aspects of transportation operations in the Port of New York, which includes the west shoreline of the Hudson River, which is within the State of New Jersey.

   The PANYNJ either developed or is the governing agency and has oversight on many of the New York Metropolitan Area's vehicular crossings between New York and New Jersey:

Bridges and Tunnels

Bus Stations

Airports

  • George Washington Bridge
  • Lincoln Tunnel
  • Holland Tunnel
  • Bayonne Bridge
  • Goethals Bridge
  • Outerbridge Crossing
  • Port Authority Bus Terminal
  • George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal
  • John F. Kennedy
  • LaGuardia
  • Newark Liberty
  • Teterboro
  • Stewart
  • Downtown Manhattan Heliport

Piers, Wharves, Basins & Seaports

   The PANYNJ is also responsible for the many of the piers, basins and seaports located along the Hudson and East Rivers including the redevelopment, upgrading and reconstruction of many, including but not limited to:

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  • Elizabeth Marine Terminal
  • Port Newark Container Terminal
  • Global Marine Terminal
  • Red Hook Container Terminal / Brooklyn Cruise Ship Terminal,
  • Howland Hook Marine Terminal / New York Container Terminal
  • Doremus Auto Terminal
  • Ridgefield Heights Auto Terminal
  • Hoboken Piers
  • Red Hook Container Terminal

    and many other Seaports, Piers and Basins throughout the New York and New Jersey waterfront.

(Footnote: The PANYNJ was especially involved in reconstruction of the piers along and in the New York Dock Railways' Fulton, Baltic and Atlantic Terminals.)

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Railroads

   It should also be noted, that railroad operations are not new to the agency, as it acquired the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad in 1962, a passenger carrying railroad between downtown Manhattan and Hoboken, NJ; as part of an agreement when planning and construction of the World Trade Center was undertaken in the mid 1960's. The Hudson & Manhattan RR was renamed "Port Authority Trans Hudson" (or as most New Yorker's call it by its acronym: "PATH").

   PANYNJ is also responsible for the construction and operation of the both the Newark and John F. Kennedy Airport's "AirTrains", a monorail type passenger transport system to link the various passenger terminals within the airport itself and to connect the airport the nearest passenger rapid transit station.

   With increasing regularity, it now appears PANYNJ is adding freight railroad operations into their list of accomplishments:

   

  • ExpressRail - Elizabeth
  • ExpressRail - Newark
  • ExpressRail - Staten Island
    and now:
  • New York New Jersey Rail

   This PANYNJ purchase of the New York New Jersey Rail could get quite interesting, as the PANYNJ appears to be quite in favor of revitalizing and expanding rail hubs and links.

   As the PANYNJ is a government agency, I would expect a lot of resistance that was or might have been previously met and encountered by the private holders and owners that were looking to expand, modify, or otherwise improve their rail operation; should no longer be a factor. One would not expect one governmental agency to incur resistance from another. 

   If this does not sound plausible; one only has to look across New York Bay at either the New York Container Terminal in Howland Hook, Staten Island or the Express Rail facility located in Newark, New Jersey to see the extensive improvements made to the rail hubs by the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, and within a relatively short period of time and with a minimal of bureaucratic resistance. 

   From a financial standpoint, as the PANYNJ is a bi-state agency (New York and New Jersey), the costs are shared by two states instead of one, which in effect should make the cost of major infrastructure improvements easier to bear financially. Whereas a private owner might experience problems in significant funds to improve their operation; whether it be adding a rail siding, tearing down an obsolete structure, etc; the PANYNJ merely adds it as a budgetary line item. Granted this may be overly simplified, but I think you can get the point.

   The success story of New York New Jersey Rail continues as the PANYNJ has purchased the Port Jersey Railroad and added it to the operations of New York New Jersey Rail in late 2010. This acquisition will add 2.4 miles of trackage to the New York New Jersey Rail operation in the State of New Jersey.

   Details of this purchase can be read in the Port Jersey chapter of this page.

   In short, we shall see where this new ownership will take this very historical and last remaining aspect of New York Harbor freight handling. I know I can say with all sincerity, I wish them the best of success!

RETURN TO INDEX


Ongoing Capital Improvements and Operations Plans

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As part of the ongoing capital investment program undertaken by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey;
reconstruction of Bush Terminal and the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal as well as the trackage interconnecting the two,
this chapter has been created to keep the reader abreast of the status of ongoing and completed improvements.

The following information comes from numerous sources and will be updated as it is provided to us.

location(s)
affected
effective
date(s)
description
of work
Bush Terminal,
South Brooklyn Marine Terminal
9/2010- Current In September 2010, service to the "Yi Pin" siding was terminated. The existing tracks along First Avenue was ripped up May 2011 and reinstalled through October 2011.

Street trackage between Bush Terminal Yard entrance at 43rd Street through 41st Street on First Avenue has been replaced. The new trackage alignment (where none existed at all previously) along First Avenue between 40th Street and South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (39th Street) was also installed and completed as of March 2012.

All trackwork from 43rd Street through 39th Street was expedited in anticipation of start up of rail service to and through South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, and before a planned sewer realignment project was to commence. But this rail traffic did not materialize. Now, realignment of sanitary & storm sewer lines has commenced (April 2012) to avoid being under street trackage and has required removal of this new segment of trackage between 40th - 39th Streets. Upon completion, trackage will be reinstalled.

Also, this expedited track segment did not provide a turnout and siding for the customer "Yi Pin" at 40th Street and customer(s) began offloading in Bush Terminal Yard. When the sewer realignment project is completed, permanent trackage will be installed INCLUDING a new turnout and siding at 40th Street for "Yi Pin". This work is expected to be completed late May / early June 2012.

Companies involved: Triumph Construction (general contracting) and J Tracks (trackwork)

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65th Street / Bay Ridge Yard 4/2012 Also in operations of 65th Street / Bay Ridge Yard has been leased to NYNJ Rail and storage and switching of railcars has commenced.
NYNJ Rail has installed a semi-permanent office trailer for train crews.
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Rail Traffic:
NYCTA equipment
5/-6/2012 Furthermore, the New York City Transit Authority has ordered 28 +/- diesel-electric work train locomotives and is expecting imminent shipment (May 2012) to Greenville, New Jersey. NYNJ Rail will be carfloating the locomotives to Brooklyn, but this will not take place until sewer realignment work along First Avenue is completed, and thereby allowing test runs of the new trackage between 43rd Street and 39th Street, prior to the trackage placed in revenue service.

Furthermore, delivery of the next orders of new subway cars R179 and R188) is expected to be carfloated eastbound (brought into Brooklyn), but this is not confirmed. Also at this time it is said R44 subway car for scrapping will be carfloated westbound (to New Jersey). However it has also been said the scrapping of these cars will take place in South Brooklyn Marine Terminal at Sims Metal Management (Hugo Sims).

RETURN TO INDEX


Properties

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   New York New Jersey Rail inherited the operational locations of it's predecessor, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad. As mentioned in the above paragraph, it is also expanding and adding other areas and has acquired a new property in December 2010.

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Brooklyn, NY

Bush Terminal Service to several spurs and customers as well as team tracks in yard until July 2012. All customer transloading now takes place at 65th Street.
65th Street Yard Eastern carfloat terminus,
Operational rights granted April 2012, in use, interchange with Long Island Railroad / New York & Atlantic Railway.
39th Street Yard former interchange with South Brooklyn Railway - property not owned by NYNJ Rail, formerly South Brooklyn Railway location.
South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard removed and property consolidated with South Brooklyn Marine Terminal January 2010
new interchange with South Brooklyn Railway at NYCTA 38th Street Yard between 3rd & 4th Avenues.
South Brooklyn Marine Terminal used frequently during 1990s - currently under reconstruction
property not owned by NYNJ Rail, railroad operational rights when Terminal reconstruction is completed.

Jersey City, NJ

Greenville Yard Western carfloat terminus - Current base of operations
Connection to Conrail Shared Assets Operations (CSX, NS)
- proposed reconstruction to include intermodal
and solid waste transfer stations, new float bridges, etc.
Port Jersey Active warehouses & intermodal facility - acquired December 2010

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Bush Terminal

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   Bush Terminal was New York New Jersey Rail's most active terminal and base of operations until April 2012.

   All customers shipping and receiving freight from Bush Terminal Yard have been relocated to the 65th Street Yard as of July 2012.

   The history of Bush Terminal prior to the New York New Jersey Rail can be read on other pages of this website:
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   Bush Terminal is located on the east side of Upper New York Harbor in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn. The Bush Terminal property occupies real estate from the bulkhead on the New York Harbor north to 39th Street, east to Second Avenue, south to 65th Street yard, returning west to the Bulkhead.

   It is strategically located directly across from New Jersey with a minimum of navigation and obstacles in Upper New York Harbor. This is predominately the reason why the Bush Terminal location has survived into the the present day, as maritime traffic will not have to navigate up the East River as it did with traffic to and from New York Dock or the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.

   The Bush Terminal Railyard is located west of First Avenue between 50th and 43rd Streets. Several spurs branch out of the yard and run east up several side streets.

   The following map, which was part of a Transportation System Management Study; is not totally accurate in the representation of current existing and operational New York New Jersey Rail trackage, but serves as a general representation of the Bush Terminal Property layout.


P. M. Goldstein collection

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The Enginehouse

   The Bush Terminal enginehouse is located at the northwest corner of the yard, off of 43rd Street. However, the structure has been condemned and is no longer used for the storage of locomotives, and administrative offices have been relocated to Greenville Yard, NJ..

   To get into the north end of the Yard, you must access it through the 43rd Street entrance. This is a guarded entrance, and requires business on premises to access.


43rd Street Entrance - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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   The structure is three tracks wide, of brick construction, and had offices in the rear (north) upstairs portion. To the right (east) of the #3 door, is a small office / workshop.

   A couple of tracks did pass along the west wall of the enginehouse to access a service alley running parallel to and between First Avenue and the Bulkhead. These tracks have now been "cut" and rail service is no longer possible to the industries in the yard and north of the enginehouse.


both photos:
Bush Terminal Enginehouse - 2007
P. F. Strubeck

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   As stated above, this structure is condemned.

   On 07 April 2011, it was learned that this structure is NOT slated for demolition as previously stated here. At the present, the plans are to keep the structure and when funds permit, renovate or reconstruct to bring the structure up to code.

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The Yard


Looking south from the northwest corner of the yard - 2007
The track at the bottom left corner runs north alongside the west wall of the enginehouse into a service alley.
The track directly in front of the caboose is the enginehouse lead.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking southeast at the loading dock and Davidson Pipe area from the northwest corner of the yard - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking south from the northeast corner of the yard - 2007
The track at the bottom runs behind the photographer through the north track entrance gate and onto First Avenue.
The right track runs onto the subway car unloading ramp.
The left track is the yard leads paralleling First Avenue.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Continuing and looking south, we are now past the subway car ramp, with the Davidson Pipe area on the right - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Southeast corner of the yard. Vacant track is float bridge lead in background - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Between the points switch throw, Bush Terminal Yard - March 16, 2010
Some of the spurs to access the industries are located on the east side of First Avenue
but have their turnouts located on the west side of First Avenue just inside the fenced property line of the Yard. 
The close proximity of these turnouts to the fence and other tracks do not provide room for
the customary switchstand set off to the side of the track. So a "low profile between the points" switch throw is used.
This is the same type of low profile switch throw as used on the outer ends of the float bridge
for locomotives to access the center track of a carfloat. This is a Bethlehem Steel model 1222 ground throw.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Float Bridges

 As of April 2012, carfloat service to Bush Terminal float bridges was discontinued.
The eastern terminus for carfloat service for Brooklyn has been moved to the Bay Ridge / 65th Street Yard.

   At the foot of 50th Street and at the southwest corner of the railyard, the Bush Terminal property hosts two carfloat aprons (also commonly referred to as float bridges) that the New York Cross Harbor Railroad utilizes for carfloat service to Greenville, New Jersey.: "Bush 1", (the southern float bridge) and "Bush 2" (or the northern float bridge). Both float bridges are located at the foot of 50th Street..

  Only the Bush 2 (the northern float bridge) is in service. Bush 1 is sunk, and remains so due to a leaky pontoon. Both float bridges are of pony plate girder construction.

 
"Bush 1" Float Bridge (sunk) - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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"Bush 2" - 2007
Prior to rebuild.
P. F. Strubeck collection

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   In the summer of 2007, a long overdue and necessary repair, in the form of a brand new steel pontoon was constructed for Bush 2 by the Great Lakes Shipyard of Cleveland, Ohio.

   This new pontoon, constructed in two parts (two separate air chambers) was transported by rail in a disassembled state to the rail yard at Greenville. The pontoon was assembled in the water and floated across to the float bridge in Brooklyn, where it was installed.

   Also, in the Fall of 2007 this float bridge would be redecked and the trackage comprising of the float bridge approach was rebuilt at this time as well:


"Bush 2" - 2007
After rebuild with new deck and pontoon.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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50th Street Float Bridges - June 28, 2008
"Bush 1" in foreground (sunk) "Bush 2" in background.
P. M. Goldstein photo
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The disconnected lead to "Bush 1" Float Bridge (behind photographer) - 2007
Bush 2 lead on right, and curves into Bush Terminal Yard.
As of 2010, this disconnected lead has now been paved over,
and a road from the float bridges to the yard exists in it's place
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Interchanges:
New York & Atlantic Railway & South Brooklyn Railway

   New York New Jersey Rail like its predecessor, can take advantage of two interchanges in its Brooklyn side of operations, but only one is actually taking place.

  The southern interchange point, with the Long Island Rail Road (and subsequently the New York & Atlantic Railway), is located at the former New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroads / Long Island Railroad 65th Street / Bay Ridge Yard. This interchange also provides access to the main land rail network via the Bay Ridge Branch to Fresh Pond, over the Hell Gate Bridge to the Bronx, and points north.

   Currently this 65th Street Yard is administered to and switched by the New York & Atlantic Railway, and at the present time no freight traffic from New York New Jersey Rail is routed for this destination. An in depth chapter on the 65th Street Yard can be read below.

   The northern interchange point is located at 39th Street and Second Avenue, and is in conjunction with the South Brooklyn Railway, a freight hauling subsidiary of the New York City Transit Authority, and part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

   Currently, no freight is received or transferred to the South Brooklyn Railway at this time. This may change with the completion of ongoing track and property reconstruction at the 39th Street Yard location.

    A separate chapter on the 39th Street Yard can be read below as well.


"Bush Junction" on Second Avenue between 37th and 39th Streets, Brooklyn, NY - January 2010
Left track is South Brooklyn Railway and leads around CostCo Wholesale Club.
Right tracks is NYNJ trackage down Second Avenue.
South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard is behind photographer.
Note the flange score marks in the concrete paralleling the NYNJ track. Something derailed here!
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Street Trackage

   What makes Bush Terminal unlike any other; is that the trains still run on trackage and routing as Bush Terminal's trains had done since 1905: right down the middle of public streets and almost every day.

   This street trackage is comprised of "girder" rail in the northern portion of trackage (the remaining un-rebuilt sections). Girder rail is a special trackage designed for street running, that has a inside guard rail already cast / extruded as part of the rail to protect the flanges of the car wheels, and to prevent derailments. This is the same type of rail to what streetcars and trolleys use to this day. Please see the Glossary for an illustration of this type of rail. In some locations these tracks are still set in the original cobblestone pavers (correctly called "setts") dating back to 1905. However, this is not expected to last much longer as the entire area is undergoing major redevelopment, with thoroughfares in this area being reconstructed using modern materials (asphalt & concrete).

   As most of the trackage used by New York New Jersey Rail is located in the street, it does not take a stretch of imagination to realize the inconveniences encountered with vehicular traffic and rail operations sharing the same space.


First Avenue & 41st Street - June 11, 2007
Looking north.

P. F. Strubeck photo

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   Here are Strubeck took extensive photographs of the street trackage in 2007. Here is a virtual tour:


Looking out the north yard entrance at 43rd Street parallel to First Avenue - 2007
Subway car ramp on left edge of photo. This is the northeast corner of the Bush Terminal Yard.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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First Avenue & 43 Street - 2007
Looking south at the northern yard entrance (right track)
Left track accesses an industry.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking northeast on First Avenue towards 41st Street - 2007
The southbound single point (tongue & nape) track turnout. Right track leads east on 41st Street.
Left track leads up First Avenue to Yi Pin Food Products and soon to be the new First Avenue access to the 39th Street Yard.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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4101 First Avenue - 2007
Looking east. The two tracks are the "main line" curving east onto 41st Street from First Avenue.
Clearance on the inside track to the building is so close, that long cars (60' +) have gouged the bricks
(to the left of the blue & white sign) on the corner of the building!
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking southwest at the intersection of 41st Street and First Avenue - 2007
The two tracks are the "main line" curving east onto 41st Street from First Avenue.
The gouged bricks can be seen in silhouette on the corner of the build just above the left traffic cone.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking south from First Avenue & 40th Street - 2007
The "main line" up 41st Street can be made out in front of the van.
The segment of track behind the photographer curves into Yi Pin Food Products.
A turnout will be installed and the track will be extended into the 39th Street Yard to
eliminate the 41st and First  Avenue and 41st and Second Avenue curves.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking south from First Avenue & 40th Street - 2007
This is the Plywood specialties spur up 41st Street can be made out in front of the van.
Note the severely damaged guard lip on the outer rail due to heavy commercial traffic and snowplows.
The segment of track behind the photographer curves into Yi Pin Food Products.
A turnout will be installed just behind the tractor trailer in the photo and the track will be extended into the 39th Street Yard to
eliminate the 41st and First Avenue and 41st and Second Avenue curves.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking northeast on Yi Pin Food Products lead - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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   The following images of trackage, although connected to active trackage operated by New York New Jersey Rail, did not see rail traffic under New York New Jersey Rail ownership. The images are included here fore historical reference.


Looking east up 41st Street towards Second Avenue - 2007
Note how the track jogs a little to the right before curving back to the left and ducking under the corner of the warehouse.
A spur once split off the right track and crossed Second Avenue to service industry on that block. 
P. F. Strubeck photo

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"Ducking" under the warehouse corner at 41st Street and Second Avenue - 2007
Looking northeast. The turnout for the 41st Street spur can be seen in the bottom right corner.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking west on 41st Street towards First Avenue - 2007
Straight track in foreground is spur that crosses Second Avenue through diamond in image below.
The curved trackage heading towards right edge of image "ducks under" the corner of warehouse.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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The 90 degree rail crossing (actually two, one has been paved over in the photo) at the intersection of 41st Street and Second Avenue - 2007
Looking east. The vertical track is the Bush Terminal spur. The horizontal track is former street car trackage.
As of May 2010, both of these diamonds have been completely paved over.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking north at the tracks emerging from under the corner of the warehouse - 2007
On the northwest corner of 41st Street and Second Avenue.
Note how the inner track is out of service, with asphalt paving over rails. Only the outside track provided service.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Intersection of 40th Street and Second Avenue - 2007
Looking north on Second Avenue towards the traffic light at 39th Street with
the tracks curving from bottom left corner are emerging from under the corner of the warehouse
and are realigning down the center of the Second Avenue.
The straight track heading to bottom of photo is street car trackage.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking northwest at "Bush Junction" into the South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard - 2007
The track from left edge is the Bush Terminal / New York New Jersey "main line" along Second Avenue.
The track from bottom center is the South Brooklyn Railway line. Track behind photographer runs around the Costco. 
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - January 26, 2010
Looking South.
P. M. Goldstein photo


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Bush Terminal Customers

Please note as of April 2012, all rail service formerly taking place within the Bush Terminal Yard has been relocated to Bay Ridge / 65th Street Yard.

consignee

location

commodity

time

notes
Cropsey Metal & Recycling Bush Terminal Yard scrap metal 199_? - 2005?
Davidson Pipe Bush Terminal Yard pipe 1994 - Current? cars originally went c/o South Brooklyn Railway;
now uses Bush Terminal Yard
East Peak Trading unknown rice unknown
Franklin Polymers 47th & Second Ave. plastic pellets 198_? - 2007? company under new ownership
Interdynamics shop alley R134a refrigerant 198_? - 2006?
Midwood Lumber 54th & First Ave. lumber 199_? - present current consignee, originally had own siding, now utilizes yard
New York City
Transit Authority
c/o SBK @
39th & Second
track material 1983 - 2006?
Yi Pin Food Products 40st & First Ave, pre-packaged sauces ca. 2003
Safety Kleen Bush Terminal Yard waste oil 1993 - ?
Vesuvio Foods unknown unknown unknown

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South Brooklyn Railway

   Therefore since its inception in 2006, it is not believed that any traffic destined for South Brooklyn Railway has occurred during the tenure of New York New Jersey Rail. With the reconstruction of the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (39th Street Yard) and a new yard access via First Avenue, this may (and hopefully) change.

   For more information on this railroad and operation please click here: South Brooklyn Railway.

Interdynamics

   This customer is north of 42nd Street (one block north of the enginehouse), and received R134A refrigerant for distribution. This customer is no longer in occupancy.

   Furthermore, the track to this location has been "cut" (disconnected) adjacent to the enginehouse (behind photographer in photo below) thereby preventing future rail service tio this siding.


Interdynamics Service Alley - 2007
Looking north from 42nd Street
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Plywood Specialties

   Located at 40th Street & First Avenue, this customer (no longer in presence) received "centerbeam" bulkhead flatcars loaded with plywood, as well as boxcars of building materials.

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Yi Pin Food Products

   As of circa 2003, a different customer, Yi Pin Food Products; utilizes the former Plywood Specialties siding and receives boxcars of bagged rice. For those of you who are fans of Chinese food (yum!), the little packages of duck sauce, hot mustard and soy sauce come from this distributor!

"The duck sauce you put on your eggroll today, was probably shipped via NYNJ Rail yesterday!"

   At the present, it is unknown if Yi Pin receives the bulk ingredients for the sauces, mixes and packages the finished product, or merely distributes pre-packaged sauces at this location.


Pulling an empty boxcar out of former Plywood Specialties siding at First Avenue & 40th Street - 2007
Looking north.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Midwood Lumber

   Located at 50th Street & First Avenue. A spur siding was constructed, but was rarely used.

   When constructed, this siding it was designed with very sharp radii, and it is difficult for modern length freight cars to negotiate the curve.

East Peak Trading

   Received boxcars of rice.

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Franklin Polymers

   Located on 47th Street and Second Avenue, this track would cut through the corner of the junk yard on the corner of 47th Street. The track would then head east and cross Second Avenue and enter into a building.

   This customer received plastic pellets for injection molding, and it is believed this firms' primary product was plastic bags.

   Service to this siding ended on an as yet unknown date, and this customer would then draw off its load in the Bush Terminal.

Davidson Pipe

   Davidson Pipe used to receive gondolas of pipe via New York Cross Harbor Railroad which would place the cars in the South Brooklyn Railway's 39th Street Yard (between First & Second Avenues). Then, the South Brooklyn Railway would move the gondolas from their 39th Street Yard into Davidson's Pipe Yard located across Second Avenue between Second & Third Avenues.

   In 1994, Davidson Pipe downsized their operation and sold their property to Costco, the wholesale club. Davidson would relocate their offices to 5002 Second Avenue. However, they would continue to receive gondolas and bulkhead flatcars of pipe, but these would now be unloaded within the Bush Terminal Yard.


Bush Terminal Yard - Davidson Pipe Area - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

Various Customers in Bush Terminal Yard

   In the main yard, there are customers who receive cars at this location, including Davidson Pipe, Midwood Lumber, Franklin Polymers and Cropsey Metals. Also located in the northeastern end of the yard, is a paved ramp which was used to unload subway cars that arrived on flatcar for the New York City Transit Authority.


Bulk plastic pellet transfer at Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
Looking south. Note the subway car unloading ramp leading up to end of covered hopper car.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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65th Street Yard

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As of April 2012, New York New Jersey Rail has moved its Brooklyn base of operations to the 65th Street Yard.

Carfloat service was also relocated to the 65th Street float bridges, becoming the eastern terminus for the carfloat route.

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   The 65th Street Yard is located at the foot of 65th Street and Second Avenue, just south of Brooklyn Army Terminal. The 65th Street Yard was formerly operated by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in conjunction with the Long Island Rail Road (Bay Ridge Division). It was then taken over by the Penn Central Railroad in January 1969. The 65th Street Yard was once home to four electrically powered cable suspended float bridges. In 1970 these four float bridges were dismantled and the yard was little used. Conrail absorbed Penn Central in 1976. 

   The 65th Street Yard was then repurchased by the Long Island Rail Road is now under the control of the Long Island Rail Road and the New York & Atlantic Railway (being the contracted freight carrier for the Long Island Rail Road).

   To get to the 65th Street Yard and interchange, New York New Jersey Rail has to exit their Bush Terminal Yard at the south end at 51st Street, resume street running of which the trackage runs down the middle of First Avenue. It would then enter the Brooklyn Army Terminal at 58th Street, and maneuver through the Brooklyn Army Terminal to the 65th Street Yard.

   While it never came to fruition, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad once planned to relocate its base of operations to the 65th Street Yard, and thus a brand new pair of cable suspended floatbridges were built at this location in 1999, ironically on the site of the previous four float bridges of the Long Island Railroad mentioned above.


65th Street Yard Float Bridges - July 2006
Looking west.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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   However in November / December 2009, New York New Jersey Rail executed a carfloat test and move using these new float bridges, and it was discovered that the rail on the float bridges was heavier (taller) than that on the carfloats! This resulted in a rail height difference at the carfloat / float bridge joint.

   Railroad Construction Corporation was contracted to remedy this situation, and a small steel wedge was welded to the top (head) of the carfloat rails. However, this modification now resulted in the carfloat rails being higher than that of the rail on the Greenville float bridges...

   Another test was conducted but the results have not been publicized. As of June 2010, the 65th Street float bridges were still inactive and the yard used intermittently, by New York Atlantic. In 2006 when I visited, there were about a dozen or so covered hoppers with one leaking plastic pellets. Several boxcars were on premises as well. About a year later, the yard was devoid of any cars.

   In April 2011, according to John McCluskey, Railroad Construction has been replacing cross ties in the 65th Street Yard for some time. Whether the float bridge tests and tie replacements are a prelude to float bridge activation, nothing has been officially published or released.

   In the "2011 Port of New York and New Jersey Port Guide" published by the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey; shows on page 45 the Regional Rail Network map. In this map, the 65th Street Yard is listed as the "New York New Jersey Rail 65th Street Intermodal Terminal".

   According to an employee of the railroad, New York New Jersey Rail has entered into an operating agreement via New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) to operate portions of the 65th Street Yard, to include one float bridge and five tracks.

   As of April 2012, operations commenced for this yard. A semi-permanent office trailer for train crews, locomotive #1133 and several freight cars were seen off hours in the yard. However, float bridge service commenced in the second week of July. This location is now the eastern terminus for the NYNJ  Rail carfloat route.

   However, no intermodal operation has taken place at 65th Street Yard as of this date.

 

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39th Street Yard

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   The 39th Street Yard is a property at the northern most end of Bush Terminal. This yard is located between First & Second Avenues, and between 39th Street and 37th Streets.


South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard - September 2007
Looking west.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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   The 39th Street Yard was the interchange location for New York Cross Harbor Railroad and the South Brooklyn Railway. This location is also known as Bush Junction, a name that dates back to early Bush Terminal Railroad operations.

   As stated earlier in the "Customers" chapter; the New York Cross Harbor Railroad transported materials much as ties, rail and other railroad related supplies to this yard, for transfer to the New York City Transit Authority. The New York Cross Harbor Railroad also placed inbound new / rebuilt subway cars just arriving from the mainland US, for transfer to the New York City Transit Authority, and hauled outbound scrap subway cars from this location for loading on a carfloat for transportation to a scrapper located in New Jersey.

   As also previously stated, the 39th Street Yard was rebuilt and this reconstruction replaced the old interchange switch on 2nd Avenue, and allegedly now only cars 50 feet and under can be moved here. If this is true, than most  if not all subway cars are prevented from using this turnout and in short, eliminating a vital source of traffic for New York New Jersey Rail.

   In 2003, the New York City Economic Development Corporation, in conjunction with the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey put forth a proposal to improve the rail access of the 39th Street Yard and to develop the property north of that yard. One of the proposals contained an automobile loading / unloading facility.

   Also proposed was a direct route from the NYNJ Rail street trackage straight up First Avenue and into the 39th Street Yard. Allegedly, the reconstruction of the curve restricted car lengths to around 50', so the average subway car (which is 70' to 80' in length) could not negotiate the curve. Whether this is fact or fiction is not known, but the fact remains that no new subway cars have transversed this trackage into the 39th Street Yard since 1994, but smaller outbound subway cars for scrapping did use Bush Junction until circa 2003. Track material shipments were unaffected and continued to use the street trackage until circa 2004.

   Currently the interchange is unused, as the turnout on First Avenue and 41st Street is welded into the Plywood Specialties position (straight alignment for First Avenue) thereby isolating the 41st Street and Second Avenue routing.

   However, as part of the current Sunset Park Revitalization Plan, new trackage and access to the 39th Street Yard is underway. This will give any traffic destined for the 39th Street Yard a straighter, more direct route into the yard, and eliminates the tight radius curves at 41 st and First Avenue, 41st Street and Second Avenue (under the corner of the warehouse) and the curve into the 39th Street Yard at 39th Street and Second Avenue (see 2007 proposal below).

   It remains to be seen, that with the construction of the new access track directly down First Avenue from 41st Street through 39th Street and into the 39th Street Yard, combined with escalating fuel prices; whether rail traffic will resume for the South Brooklyn Railway via the float bridges of the New York New Jersey Rail.

   As of January 2010, reconstruction of the 39th Street Yard has commenced and continues at time of this update, April 2011.

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Readers Please Note:

   It now appears from documents located on the web, that the 39th Street Yard is now considered to be part of the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal property, which is owned by the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC). However, operations of the SBMT property is contracted out to the Axis Group.

   As current data reflects that the South Brooklyn Railway / New York City Transit Authority / Metropolitan Transportation Authority no longer has interest in the 39th Street Yard; all updates pertaining to reconstruction of and / or operations in the former 39th Street Yard will be posted in the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal chapter below.  

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South Brooklyn Marine Terminal

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Customers

consignee

commodity

time

notes
Sims Recycling scrap metal & recycling 2/10/2014 - present

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..

   The piers west of the 39th Street Yard are known as the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal.

   Strangely, rail service to this pier was not provided by the South Brooklyn Railway as one would expect, but by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad which would have to pass through the 39th Street Yard of the South Brooklyn Railroad to enter the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal. By the way, the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal is not affiliated with the South Brooklyn Railway.

   It is also now understood that the 39th Street Yard is no longer associated with the South Brooklyn Railway / New York City Transit Authority / Metropolitan Transportation Authority and belongs to the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal.

   While it appears the South Brooklyn Railway will still have access via the 39th Street route (around the Costco property), the yard will be serviced by New York New Jersey Rail via a new track access located on First Avenue & 39th Street (see 2007 proposal below).

     According to published proposals and observed in  their attached diagrams, existing east-west trackage from the 39th Street Yard is being removed, new trackage is being installed on a north-south orientation in the yard, and the siding leading down the pier and into the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (adjacent to the former American Stevedoring Pier) has been reconstructed as well.

   The following is an excerpt located in the New York State Department of Transportation non-NYSDOT Economic Recovery Act / Tiger pre-application online archives. This "pre-application" was submitted by the New York City Economic Development Corporation.

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2003 Proposal

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2007 Proposal

   

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Current diagram - 2011

   
Port of New York & New Jersey Website - South Brooklyn Marine Terminal
http://www.seaportsinfo.com/panynj/portfacilities/?page=southbrooklyn

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   During a visit in January 2010, Philip M. Goldstein took several photos of track and siding reconstruction. Apparently the proposed improvements are underway:


South Brooklyn Marine Terminal - January 2010
Looking west adjacent to the Pier. Note new track laid in distance.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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South Brooklyn Marine Terminal - January 2010
Looking west. New concrete ties awaiting installation.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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South Brooklyn Marine Terminal - January 2010
Looking west. Another view of the new concrete ties awaiting installation.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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South Brooklyn Marine Terminal - January 2010
Looking east at the South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard.
Note track stubs ending in middle of parking area.
It appears both the north and south leads will be reconnected once trackage is rebuilt.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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   As of 06 April 2011, all previous trackage from South Brooklyn Railway has been removed. The new "Bush Interchange" track and wharf siding (constructed in 2010) are the only tracks remaining.

   Piles of concrete ties have been delivered and are presumably going to be used for the yard rebuild.

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Service Begins to Sims Recycling

   As of February 10, 2014; rail traffic commenced and freight service has been instituted to Sims Recycling located at the northern part of the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal at 30th Street.

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Greenville Yard

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   The railyard at Greenville, NJ, is located in Jersey City, New Jersey, and is the westernmost point of interchange of New York New Jersey Rail. It is currently the base of operations and house a modest trailer which is used as offices for management personnel.

   While having been discussed many times before on this website, the history of Greenville is worth reiterating.

   Greenville Yard, including the float bridges; was originally constructed by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1904 when the PRR outgrew it's Harsimus Cove Yard (somewhat north on the New Jersey shoreline). In it's heyday, this yard was huge. But perhaps what is most interesting is that Greenville Yard rests atop a man-made peninsula.

   The original Greenville float bridges and support structures were made of all wood, but following a massive fire in 1931; they were rebuilt in steel to prevent a repeat of the conflagration. Greenville Yard now featured six pony plate girder electrically powered cable suspension float bridges, numbered 9 ½ through 14.

   Greenville Yard as originally constructed, also featured such apparatus as a hump yard, outbound / inbound yards, car repair facilities and even a steel staging area for New York City building construction.

   As mentioned on the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal page of this website; after Conrail took over Class 1 operations in 1976; is did not want to involve itself in marine operations. Therefore, the carfloating operations were contracted out to Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in 1976.

   Following the cessation of operations of Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal / New York Dock in 1983, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad received the lease on Greenville from Conrail. It was said that part of a revised agreement in 1983, that Conrail would maintain the yard and floatbridges in Greenville, with New York Cross Harbor Railroad doing the switching and carfloat work.

   However, after two float bridges collapsed (#13 & 14 or the southernmost two) around 1991 and with Conrail refusing to repair them, outright ownership of the float bridges and structures, along with the floating rights were transferred to New York Cross Harbor Railroad, but the land remains Conrail Shared Assets owned. See the float bridge chapter for more information.

   Most of the float bridges are still there, albeit in various states of disrepair; except for #11 which is in service at this time. Number 11's outer apron was replaced in 1994, and numbers 13 and 14 which were dismantled in 1997, following the partial collapse of the suspension gantry.


Note that this shows 12 Bridge as operational!
As 12 Bridge was operational until 1992, this map and the others as part of the TSM Study must predate that year.
P. M. Goldstein collection

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   Tracks were numbered in Greenville as following: 12-3 (southern most), 12-2, 12-1, 11-4, 11-3, 11-2, 11-1 and the Crane Track. Greenville is currently comprised of approximately 27 acres.

   Greenville itself never really had any customers other than being a transload operation until 2006; at which time a new consignee would receive boxcars filled with hay on the Crane Track. This customer is still in operation and receives this commodity to this day.


Greenville Float Bridges - February 26, 2009
Looking northeast.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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10 Bridge (foreground w/ round corners)
with 9 ½ Bridge (background w/ square corners) - February 26, 2009
Note the construction differences and "newer" appearance of 9 1/2 Bridge counterweights & gantry.
This is because 9 ½ Bridge was installed after 10 through 14 Bridges were originally installed, and is in fact newer.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Close up of 10 Bridge Bulkhead Anchor & Pivot - February 26, 2009
Note the position of 9 ½ Bridge in background: it is pulled out of its pivot box and a portion of the pivot wheel can be seen.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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10 / 11 Bridge gantry support girders - February 26, 2009
Note the scoring effects of the wave action. The upper left support base is completely undermined
and the bottom right is nearly so with only a small diameter of concrete remaining!
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 / 12 Bridge gantry support girders - February 26, 2009
A very well designed reconstruction of the support girder base. Under the cut stone block are 12 x 12 creosoted bridge timbers.
This will undoubtedly last significantly longer than the cast concrete bases shown previously in the 10 / 11 gantry support image.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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10 Bridge Apron - February 26, 2009
Note
9 ½ Bridge apron at the opposite angle in background. It is still attached to and suspended by the apron counterweight cables.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge - July 2006
The only float bridge in Greenville currently in operation.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge bulkhead anchor box & pivot wheel - February 26, 2009
Does anyone doubt the corrosive effects of salt water?
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge operators cabin & gantry access stairs - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Close up of the 11 Bridge operators window which has been retrofitted into the original window sashes - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge eyebar (to worm drive) and cable suspension (to counterweights) - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge - February 26, 2009
Showing electric hawser winch drum, apron counterweights, manual hawser winch, counterweight cable with anchor and toggle.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge apron dampening cylinder - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge apron / bridge hinges - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge apron showing toggles and rail alignment ratchet - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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close up of 11 Bridge rail alignment ratchet - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge electric hawser winch drum - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge manual hawser winch and toggle - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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12 Bridge (out of service) - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

Currently, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has plans to reconstruct the Greenville Yards as well:  

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May 18, 2010 - PANYNJ Press Release

PORT AUTHORITY BOARD APPROVES PURCHASE AND REDEVELOPMENT OF GREENVILLE YARDS, I
INCLUDING A BARGE-TO-RAIL FACILITY TO TAKE TRUCKS OFF THE ROAD

Date: May 18, 2010

Press Release Number: 27-2010

Focusing on Replacing Trash Trucks with Sealed Rail Containers, Improving Air Quality and Reducing Truck Traffic on Hudson River Crossings

The Port Authority Board of Commissioners today authorized the agency to move ahead with the purchase and redevelopment of Greenville Yards, a century-old rail yard in Jersey City, N.J. that will serve as the lynchpin to removing up to 360,000 trash trucks annually from trans-Hudson crossings and New Jersey highways by moving New York City's sealed containerized solid waste and other commodities by barge and rail when appropriate facilities are completed by 2013.

Greenville Yards today forms the western terminus for New York New Jersey Rail LLC, which is owned by the Port Authority and operates the last cross-harbor car float system on the Hudson River. Under this system, freight is loaded on rail cars and the cars are moved by barge from Greenville to Brooklyn, N.Y., where they are either delivered to local customers or handed over to another railroad to reach their destination.

The Board authorized $118.1 million for the overall project, part of which will go toward the purchase of approximately 47 acres of upland property and 72 acres of riparian rights at Greenville, and part of which will go toward the existing rail car float system operating between Greenville Yards and sites at 51st and 65th streets in Brooklyn, N.Y. Funding for this authorization will come from federal and state grants, and Port Authority funds.

A new barge-to-rail facility, to be built at Greenville Yards, will allow for municipal solid waste and other commodities to be barged from New York to New Jersey in watertight sealed containers and taken out of New Jersey by rail. Currently, the majority of New York City's waste is trucked through the Port Authority's Hudson River crossings in unsealed, open-topped trucks with fabric coverings and continues out of state using New Jersey's roads, causing negative environmental consequences, worsening traffic congestion, and overburdening the region's bridge and highway infrastructure.

New York Governor David Paterson said, "This barge-to-rail facility will be an extremely beneficial and environmentally conscious infrastructure improvement to the New York Metropolitan Region. We must continue to reduce truck congestion in our overburdened tunnels and on our highways to improve the quality of life for our residents. I would like to thank Governor Christie of New Jersey, Congressman Nadler, Chris Ward and the rest of the Port Authority staff for their efforts in securing the funds necessary for this project.”

Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said, "Our bridges and tunnels are overburdened with truck traffic, and today's action provides an environmentally sound alternative. It will provide a host of important benefits - reduced congestion for those who use our crossings, a better quality of life for the people of our region, and lower bridge and tunnel maintenance costs for the Port Authority."

Port Authority Executive Director Chris Ward said, "This is exactly the kind of business the Port Authority was created to take on. It is a win for the environment, a win for relieving traffic congestion and a win for economic competitiveness. I want to thank Governor Christie for his leadership on this issue, as well as Congressman Jerry Nadler and the Federal Highway Administration for leading the way in securing the federal funding that will allow us to revitalize the cross-harbor car-float operation and reinvigorate this vital freight corridor."

Port Authority Deputy Executive Director Bill Baroni said, "This facility gives us a once-in-a-lifetime chance to maximize our waterways and rail systems and take up to 360,000 trash trucks off New Jersey's major highways each year. That's a benefit that's good for those who travel through this region every day, and even better news for those who live and work in New Jersey."

New York City plans to ship an estimated 120,000 to 180,000 containers of solid waste per year through two barge-to-rail transfer points on the western side of the Port of New York and New Jersey. If Greenville is used for this purpose, it would handle about half of the container stream, with the balance going to the other selected facility. In order to meet this demand, the Port Authority will make improvements to decades-old track and infrastructure, as well as construct a modern barge-to-rail transfer facility. Today's Board action will allow these improvements to move forward.

The purchase of Greenville Yards and the rehabilitation of track and infrastructure there also provides the Port Authority with major benefits, including reduced costs to maintain its bridges from the wear and tear caused by daily truck traffic. Each year, the Port Authority spends more than $30 million maintaining the deck of the George Washington Bridge upper roadway, due primarily to truck traffic. In addition, the reduction of up to 360,000 trash truck trips a year will significantly reduce the levels of harmful emissions currently generated by truck shipments.

The barge-to-rail facility to be built at Greenville Yards will connect [with] two railroads - CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway. Since freight trains are not allowed in Amtrak's North River Tunnels, and the Poughkeepsie Bridge was closed in 1974, the cross harbor car float system is the only Hudson River rail freight crossing within 140 miles of New York City.

Oct 21, 2010 - The Journal of Commerce

Port of NY-NJ Approves Design Work for Rail Hub

Ports / Terminals | Maritime | United States

by Peter T. Leach

Intermodal facility at Greenville Yard would handle containerized waste

At their monthly meeting Thursday, the commissioners of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey authorized expenditure of $3 million for planning and preliminary design work for the development of an intermodal container transfer facility at the Greenville Yard-Port Authority Marine Terminal in Jersey City.

The port authority plans to develop an ExpressRail facility on the Greenville Yards that the commissioners authorized it to buy and redevelop in May.

NY-NJ Port development news from JOC:

NY-NJ Port Plans Environmental Study.

The expanded rail yard could handle up to 250,000 containers per year.

With expected completion in 2013, the new facility will help remove as many as 360,000 trash trucks annually from trans-Hudson crossings and New Jersey highways by moving New York City sealed containerized solid waste and other commodities by barge and rail.

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April 29, 2011 - Bid Request for Reconstruction of Greenville Yard & Float Bridges

    On 16 June 2011, I received the following .pdf document from Joe Roborecky. Despite this late date of addition to this website, this document has been public for a while.

   This document pertains to the PANYNJ soliciting bids for the temporary stabilization of Float Bridge #11 and its main and apron Gantries, the demolition of existing float bridges 9½, 10, 12, and the construction of new float bridges 9 and 10. Also included in this request is the construction repair of one carfloat (#29) and the construction of a brand new four track carfloat.

   This document is exceptionally well composed, easy to understand and contains great amount of detail, including but not limited to:

 .

   For quick reference, I am excerpting the schedule of construction and demolition here:

project

start date

estimated duration
of project

repair of existing Float Bridge #11 & fender system for slip #11 July 2011 16 months
rehabilitation of Carfloat #29 July 2011 12 months
support trackage for Float Bridge #9 & trailers July 2011 24 months
Tropicana tracks & reconfiguration of 'A' Yard trackage July 2011 21 months
dredging and related docking / tie up systems for Float Bridge #9 July 2011 24 months
phased demolition of existing (out of service) Float Bridges 9½, 10, 12 September 2011 18 months
new carfloat September 2011 14 months
support trackage for Float Bridge #10 January 2012 n/a
Float Bridge #10 (installation?) January 2012 n/a
demolition of existing Float Bridge #11 September 2012
(to be confirmed)
n/a

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   Also, here is a thumbnail of the proposed renovations of the Greenville Yard, The map below shows the proposed layout following reconstruction which is superimposed upon the current yard configuration. The full size map is huge, so click on the "thumbnail" below for the full size map and allow a few moments for it open. Please use the back arrow on your browser to return here.

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   As the entire document is 115 pages in its entirety, here is a link to the .pdf file for you to read as your leisure:

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Request for Proposals for Performance of Expert Professional Engineering Design Services
for Port Jersey - Cross Harbor Freight Program
RFPDOC_24554.pdf

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Port Jersey Railroad

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   The Port Jersey Railroad was established in 1970, as a 2.4 mile terminal railroad within the Port Jersey distribution center complex in Jersey City, New Jersey. The operation, of which the entire staff consisted of just two employees; existed solely to serve itself and it's customers within the Port Jersey complex.  

   In a meeting held on September 30, 2010, the principals of the the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey discussed the following:

   As a result of that meeting, the following was filed:

New York New Jersey Rail, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Line of Railroad in Hudson County, NJ

A Notice by the Surface Transportation Board on 12/03/2010

Publication Date: Friday, December 03, 2010

75 FR 75545

Docket No. FD 35444

Document Number: 2010-30275

New York New Jersey Rail, LLC (NYNJ), [1] a Class III rail carrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.41 to acquire and operate approximately 2.4 miles of rail line located in the Greenville section in Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ. According to NYNJ, the rail line has no milepost numbers.

NYNJ states that it will shortly enter into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Port Jersey Railroad Company (PJR) to acquire a significant portion of the operating assets of PJR to enable NYNJ to provide freight services to shippers within the Greenville section of Jersey City. NYNJ states that it currently interchanges with and will continue to interchange with Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) at its junction with Conrail's Greenville “A” Yard track located in Jersey City.

NYNJ also states that the proposed transaction does not contain any language that would limit its ability to interchange traffic with other carriers. According to NYNJ, the line only connects with lines of Conrail.

NYNJ certifies that its projected annual revenues as a result of the transaction will not result in NYNJ becoming a Class II or Class I rail carrier and will not exceed $5 million annually.

NYNJ states that it expects the transaction to be consummated on or shortly after the effective date of this exemption. The earliest this transaction may be consummated is December 19, 2010, the effective date of the exemption (30 days after the exemption was filed).

If the verified notice contains false or misleading information, the exemption is void ab initio. Petitions to revoke the exemption under 49 U.S.C. 10502(d) may be filed at any time. The filing of a petition to revoke will not automatically stay the effectiveness of the exemption. Petitions for stay must be filed no later than December 10, 2010 (at least 7 days before the exemption becomes effective).

An original and 10 copies of all pleadings, referring to Docket No. FD 35444, must be filed with the Surface Transportation Board, 395 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20423-0001. In addition, a copy of each pleading must be served on James H.M. Savage, John D. Heffner, PLLC, 1750 K Street, NW., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20006.

Board decisions and notices are available on our Web site at http://www.stb.dot.gov.

Decided: November 26, 2010.

By the Board, Joseph H. Dettmar, Acting Director, Office of Proceedings.

Andrea Pope-Matheson,

Clearance Clerk.

[FR Doc. 2010-30275 Filed 12-2-10; 8:45 am]

Footnotes

1. NYNJ is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

 

On 22 November 2010, Joe Roborecky forwarded the following Surface Transportation Board filing (.pdf file), as submitted by New York New Jersey Rail and received by the Surface Transportation Board on 19 November 2010. Here is the document as a .pdf file:

November 19, 2010
New York New Jersey Rail - Acquisition & Operation Exemption
Line of Railroad In Hudson County, NJ -
Surface Transportation Board Finance Docket 35444

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December 3, 2010
Surface Transportation Board Decision of
Proposed Acquisition of Port Jersey RR by New York New Jersey Rail
Surface Transportation Board Finance Docket 35444

      For the record, the Port Jersey Railroad is a switching operation providing rail service to a several manufacturers and warehousing concerns just southwest of and abutting against the Greenville Yard. Prior to its purchase by the PANYNJ, this operation was a New Jersey based operation, and therefore it was not covered by this website. However, with it being purchased by the PANYNJ, it will now be included on this page as it is now an integral part of New York New Jersey Rail.

   In short, these filings are applications to acquire and operate the Port Jersey Railroad. The Port Jersey Railroad is an small industrial line serving several warehouses and container terminals just southwest of the New York New Jersey Rail Greenville Yard:

   The five customers (keyed to the map above) currently known at Port Jersey are:

1) East Coast Warehouse Temperature controlled and dry storage, customs services, full, nationwide logistics services.
2) Falcon International Distributors Importer and distributor of Spanish products from Mexico, Central America,
South America and the Caribbean islands, also carries American branded products of the USA.
3) Global Terminal & Container Closest marine container terminal to the entrance of New York Harbor:1800 ft. berth, 42 foot draft.
4) Inter Globo International freight forwarders operating a warehouse and distribution center
5) Well Luck Corporation Importer and distributor of Oriental foods.

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   Updates on the Port Jersey Railroad acquisition and operations will be forthcoming, as they develop.

   As of June 2011, it appears the from referencing the New York New Jersey Rail website, that the Port Jersey Railroad will be operated as a division of New York New Jersey Rail.

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Operations Videos

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   On 31 May 2011, both Philip M. Goldstein and Paul Strubeck visited Bush Terminal and took both still photography and videography of New York New Jersey Rail operations.

   The videos show both street running (which other railfans have taken as well); but the real interest lies with the videos of the float bridge operation and carfloat drilling. To our knowledge, these are currently the only videos showing this unique operation.

   The videos are hosted on YouTube, so please feel free to bookmark them as you watch them and commenting on the video is enabled:

NYNJ Rail - from yard to float bridge lead @ Bush Terminal, Brooklyn NY
NYNJ Rail - carfloat mooring and car unloading @ Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY
NYNJ Rail - unloading second carfloat: Part 1 of 2 - Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY
NYNJ Rail - unloading second carfloat: Part 2 of 2 - Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY
NYNJ Rail - street running along First Avenue (s/b) @ Bush Terminal; Brooklyn, NY
NYNJ Rail - street running along First Avenue (n/b) from Brooklyn Army Terminal to Bush Terminal

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MAIN INDEX

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Special Movements

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NYCTA OL 912 - MotivePower Incorporated R156 move - May 1, 2012

   After much speculation, it was learned on 09 May that New York New Jersey Rail did in fact carfloat from Greenville, NJ; the first locomotive in the R156 order for New York City Transit Authority.

   The arrival of this locomotive had been anticipated for sometime, but an actual date was not known. Then photos of the NYCT locomotive were located with the locomotive having been photographed in the Transit System being hauled by South Brooklyn Railway locomotives.

    Several accounts in railfan forums had this locomotive arrive via CSXT over Hell Gate Bridge to New York and Atlantic Railway interchange at Fresh Pond Yard, Queens; and then with final delivery to Linden Shops. South Brooklyn Railway locomotives N1 and N2 with NYCTA Rider Car RD411 were seen towing the locomotive through the BMT system afterwards.

   Frustratingly, this is now confirmed to be partially incorrect.

   Both these kind gentleman were courteous enough to allow their images to be reposted here after originally being posted on www.nycsubway.org. Dave Pirmann of www.nycsubway.org also deserves recognition as well, for forwarding my emails to them to secure usage here.


Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - May 1, 2012
NYNJ Rail #1133 [SW1500] w/ NYCTA #OL912 [R156]
Michael Hodurski photo
used with permission

added 10 May 2012

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First Avenue  & 53rd Street, Brooklyn, NY - May 1, 2012
NYNJ Rail #1133 w/ NYCTA OL912 enroute to 65th Street / Bay Ridge Yard interchange with New York & Atlantic Rwy.
John Dooley photo
used with permission

added 10 May 2012

   As of January 2014, time goes on, the New York City Subway locomotives continue to arrive.

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RETURN TO
MAIN INDEX

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Hurricane Sandy - 29 October 2012

.

   On 29 October 2012, Hurricane Sandy made herself felt in the New York Metropolitan area and directly affected operations of New York New Jersey Rail.

   Despite the hurricane making landfall just south of Atlantic City, NJ at approximately 20:00 hours EDST; the immense size of Hurricane Sandy impacted New York City. Winds from Hurricane Sandy were in excess of 90 miles per hour, with winds to some degree or another recorded at over 1000 miles away from the center of the storm.

   These winds caused an extensive storm surge, which was further exacerbated by a full moon tidal surge coinciding with a normal high tide. This caused extreme and record breaking flooding in the New York Harbor area.

   The surge level at Battery Park (Lower Manhattan, NY) peaked at 13.88 feet at 21:24 hours, Monday, 29 October 2012. This surpassed a 10.02 foot record water level set by Hurricane Donna in 1960.

   Furthermore, New York Harbor's surf also set a record during Hurricane Sandy, when a buoy measured a 32.5 foot wave that same evening. That wave was 6.5 feet taller than a 25 foot wave churned up by Hurricane Irene in 2011.

   As the storm was travelling in a westerly direction, Greenville Yard (located on the west shore of Upper New York Bay) was more severely impacted that that of 65th Street / Bay Ridge Yard or Bush Terminal.

   Conflicting reports by railfan accounts  began occurring this time. However, on 09 November 2012 ; I received a personal reply by telephone from a very well placed internal source in response to my email inquiry as to the extent of damage at NYNJ Rail facilities. I was informed that:

Greenville, NJ

Substantial damage to gantries, float bridges and yard. A deck barge was driven into the Apron Gantry over 10 Bridge.
Float bridge gantries appear to have slight lean. 10 Bridge has significant lean and appears to be collapsing, 11 Bridge appears to have minor damage.
(float bridge gantries subsequently demolished 11/17/12 - see below)

Extensive flooding and debris  / flotsam deposits in yard.
Operations office trailer ripped from foundation, floated south to 'BMW' automotive unloading facility.
Most of the older concrete carfloat moorings significantly damaged.
.

65th Street

No visible damage.
Electric winches on new float bridges obviously went under water. No damage as they are weather proofed.
.

Bush Terminal

No visible damage.
(Bush 2 float bridge relocated to Greenville, NY 11/21/2012)

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Locomotives

#1133 (65th Street) No reported or visible damage
#2293 (Greenville) none
#1197 (Port Jersey) none
.. .

Carfloats

Carfloat #29
Carfloat #16 safely stored in Port Newark Channel prior to storm.
sunk
no damage

Internal sources state it will be at least several weeks before operations resume.
Damage assessment ongoing, a more definitive timeframe for restoration of service will hopefully be forthcoming. 

    Previous report of old BAT pontoon float bridge being refloated by storm was incorrect. It turned out to be "Jersey Barriers" on the bulkhead. Sorry for the false report.

.

.

02 / 03 November 2012

   The following images were furnished by Paul Strubeck, who transited through New York Harbor onboard a tugboat on November 2, 2012 (Four days after Hurricane Sandy). Like the old adage, a picture is worth a thousand words.


Google Earth - 03 November 2012

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridges 12 through 9
½.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 22 November 2012

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridge #12
The apron gantry and bridge apron were removed prior.
Note there is a sunken carfloat in front of Bridge #12 with deck and cleats just above the water surface.
The box like structure to the left edge  of image is the old Bush 2 Bridge Pontoon
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 20 November 2012

.

.


Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridge #12 and #11.
Note there is a sunken carfloat in front of Bridge #12 with deck and cleats just abo
ve the water surface.
Box shaped structure on left edge is former Bush 2 float bridge pontoon.

P. F. Strubeck photo
added 20 November 2012

.

.


Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Sunken carfloat with "broken back" in front of Bridge #12 (note how rails curve into water).
Boxy shape on extreme left was old pontoon from Bush Terminal  "Bush 2" Bridge.
It is believed this is Carfloat #29.

P. F. Strubeck photo
added 20 November 2012

.

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridge #11
It appears the counterweight / support towers for 11 Bridge are now leaning slightly towards 10 Bridge, due to the collapse of 10 Bridge support tower.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 20 November 2012

.

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridge #11
It appears the counterweight / support towers for 11 Bridge are now leaning slightly towards 10 Bridge, due to the collapse of 10 Bridge support tower.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 20 November 2012

.

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridge #10 and #9
½.
Note how the Apron Gantry is now severely sagging and bent over 10 Bridge.
Note the sagging of apron gantry over 9
½ Bridge as well.
Also note that the barge has washed up and over the finger pier between 10 Bridge and 9
½ Bridge
and has come to rest on top of the finger piers parallel to the apron gantry / perpendicular to the slip; as the water receded.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 20 November 2012

.

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Zoom on 10 Bridge.
Note how the Apron Gantry is now severely sagging and bent over 10 Bridge.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 20 November 2012

.

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Greenville, NJ - 02 November 2012
Transfer Bridges 12 through 9
½.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 20 November 2012

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Greenville, NY - 02 November 2012
These carfloat / barge tie up anchorages were all the same height prior to Hurricane Sandy.
It appears they left most four have been underscored and now sit lower in the water by several feet.

P. F. Strubeck photo
added 20 November 2012

.

Greenville Gantries Gone... - 21 November 2012

   It is my sad duty to report that as of Saturday 17 November 2012 at 5:40 pm EST; the Greenville transfer bridge gantries were demolished. My source confirmed the fear the Hurricane Sandy severely underscored the support pedestals, and on top of that; drove a barge into the gantry columns. After several engineers examined the structure, it was deemed unsafe and ordered to be razed.

   I have to add my opinion here. While talking with my source, I feel the correct decision was made. As much as I love the history of New York Harbor Rail Marine infrastructure, there comes a time when you have to make a decision to move on. You can't save everything. If you spend the financial resources saving 81 year old float bridge gantries, you can not invest in the future. And if we as a group (the Rail-Marine fans) are interested in seeing carfloating operations continue in New York Harbor, sacrifices have to made.

   However, it is my pleasure to report that officials at NYNJRail recognized the historical importance of the Greenville Bridges and many aspects of the construction and operation were saved for posterity, including a complete bridge operators console, knife switch boards, etc. These are in secure storage until such time they can be displayed properly. Kudos to those persons who thought ahead. You know who you are...

   Paul Strubeck shot the following image from 58th Street pier in Brooklyn.


Looking across Upper New York Bay at Greenville, NJ - November 21, 2012
No more gantries. The floating cranes are in the process of constructing the new float bridge approach. Crane on right is driving piles.
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 22 November 2012

.

   So, the demolition of the Greenville transfer bridges ends an important chapter in the history of New York Harbor transfer bridges, but if there is a positive side, (and if my source is correct and so far has been "on the money"); a new era of carfloating in New York Harbor should be emerging in the near future..

   Stay tuned! .

.

   Meanwhile, on the Brooklyn Side...

   Our other man on the scene, John McCluskey; photographed the Bush 2 pontoon float bridge already on a barge ready for transport to Greenville, as having been lifted earlier in the day by Weeks Marine Floating Crane 533 on 21 November 2012:


Brooklyn, NY - November 21, 2012
J. McCluskey photo

added 22 November 2012

   For the record, Weeks 533 with its 500 ton lifting capacity, is third largest floating crane on the Eastern Seaboard, and the largest fully revolving floating crane on the Eastern Seaboard.

   The Weeks 533 was originally called the Marine Boss and was built in 1965 for Murphy Pacific Marine to be used in the construction of the San Mateo bridge in California. It was bought in 1988 by Weeks. It was originally purchased for parts, but as fortune would have it, it would be rebuilt.

   The Bush Terminal float bridge is being transferred to Greenville, where it will be placed in service to allow carfloating to resume between Greenville and Bay Ridge. A few hours after the floating crane left Bush Terminal, Paul Strubeck shot these photos of the empty float bridge slip.


Bush 2 Bridge Slip - Brooklyn, NY - November 21, 2012
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 22 November 2012

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.

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Bush 2 Bridge Slip  and Bush 1 derelict - Brooklyn, NY - November 21, 2012
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 22 November 2012


Return to Operation - 21 December 2012

52 Days!

   Reliable internal sources have honored their promise to keep this author in the loop on the ongoing reconstruction of the Greenville facility.

   Throughout the Greenville reconstruction phase I have been kept abreast of the details by a very reliable high placed source within the organization, but could not publish them.

   On 21 December, my contact (to whom I remain eternally grateful for keeping me in the loop!); contacted me via telephone once again: the embargo was lifted off New York New Jersey Rail Operations as of this day, with revenue service is expected to return following the holiday season.

   A test run on 20 December including loading, unloading and carfloat mooring took place, and was successful.

   It must be kept in mind, this embargo was lifted a mere 52 days after Hurricane Sandy severely damaged the original Greenville float bridge gantries. Keep in mind all the obstacles that had to be overcome to obtain this goal (and this is the 'short' list!):
.

.

   While many other details and support infrastructure still remain to be completed (yard lighting, access roads, offshore mooring piles for the carfloat(s), operations / crew office, etc.), construction is anticipated to continue throughout the winter (barring any severe weather).

   However, this rapid completion of the essential services allows New York New Jersey Rail to lift the embargo and return to revenue freight service.

   To quote my highly placed internal source directly:

   If you would make mention that in 52 Days from October 29, 2012 when Hurricane Sandy hit and the surge caused massive damage to the NYNJR infrastructure at Greenville Yard Jersey City and also to 65th Street Brooklyn NY - we are able to do an amazing recovery - using an outstanding plan of action which finished on December 20, 2012 in success.

   The taking of the 51st Street Float Bridge in Brooklyn, taking down and removal of the severely damaged Greenville Yard Liftbridge and and redeployment of the new "Greenville Pontoon Bridge" will go down as one of the most incredible recovery stories. Truly our railroad forefathers would have been proud."

   52 days... When you realize this is less than two months, and the amount of work involved, it is truly astounding what was in fact accomplished.

   NYNJ Rail employees worked many extra hours and through the Thanksgiving holiday. Many sacrificed personal time with their families, and all deserve a huge round of credit for their accomplishment!

    Empty gondolas loaded aboard Carfloat 16 in Brooklyn at the 65th Street Yard, floated across Upper New York Bay to Greenville, where the carfloat was moored to the float bridge, and cars unloaded successfully and without incident.

   Upon completion of such, the freight embargo which was instituted by NYNJ Rail on October 29, has been officially lifted. Revenue service is expected to resume to NYNJ Rail customers after the Christmas holiday. 

   The former 51st Street float bridge or "Bush 2 Bridge", is being officially referred to now as "Greenville Pontoon Bridge".

   I have been forwarded many images taken by this reliable source for publication here aas well as by NYNJ Rail employee J. Lada, to whom I am also grateful. I am now able to share all these images with the New York Harbor Rail - Marine community.

   Without further ado; here are the images of the construction, debris and test run. Please refer under images for dates.  


Greenville, NJ - December 17, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 17, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 17, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012



Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
"Bush 2" at it's new home!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Remains of a section of one of the old float bridges.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Electric mooring winches installed on the former Bush 2 float bridge!
I'll bet the train crews are ecstatic!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
The new pier trestle with float bridge lead trackage.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
NYNJ Rail #2293 waiting patiently!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Toggle bar and toggle bar sockets.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
An old winch. Presumably from the amount of corrosion, this one is off the apron of 10 Bridge as that
apron had collapsed into the water many years prior to Hurricane Sandy.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Winch, center equalizing yoke, eyebars and lifting screws.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Gantry mechanism gearing.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
#2293 on the Bridge!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Pontoon mounting brackets!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Spiffy!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Electrical service panels and junction boxes on the old float bridge jack A frame.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
The manual winch wheel!
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Remans of one of the original fender piers.
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of J. Lada

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
Carfloat 16 approaches the newly installed "Greenville Pontoon Bridge" (the former Bush 2" float bridge from Brooklyn)
for the first time during test run.
courtesy of internal source

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
NYNJ Rail #2293 begins to drill the test carfloat.
Note walkway grating has been installed up the center of the pier trestle.
courtesy of internal source

added 21 December 2012


Greenville, NJ - December 20, 2012
courtesy of internal source

added 21 December 2012

   The author once again would like to thank his "internal source" for the images, and constant updates!

RETURN TO INDEX


Locomotive Overview & Liveries

.

   In 2004, the predecessor of New York New Jersey Rail: New York Cross Harbor Railroad purchased two ex-Union Pacific Yard (UPY) Electro Motive Division model SW-1500 Switchers. One of these locomotives remains in service today. The other unit was sold / traded to Juniata Terminal and is no longer on the property.

.

   BDLX #2293 would arrive in 2000 in red & gray primer, and would not be repainted by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

   In 2006, upon the New York New Jersey Rail purchase, this locomotive would be painted in a red and green livery by New York New Jersey Rail. This livery was euphemistically called the "Christmas" livery by area railfans.

   UPY #1133 was to remain in Union Pacific Yard livery (yellow with red lettering) right up until May 2010. Fortunately, pictures were taken the very weekend that the locomotive was repainted and this webpage has the first photographs of the new but incomplete livery. It is now red, white and blue: blue body, red ends with a white stripe and the NYNJ Rail logo within the white stripe.

   In May 2010, it was learned that NYNJ Rail has once again repainted locomotive #2293 and now both locomotives (#2293 and #1133) are in a unified NYNJ Rail livery. This would mark the first time in 12 years that two locomotives operating for the sole remaining New York Area carfloating operation would share the same livery! 

   As a result of the Port Jersey Railroad purchase of December 2010, PJRR #1197 has been seen operating on the New York New Jersey Rail's Greenville float bridges. Therefore, that locomotive is now included in the roster and photos. Whether it will be painted in NYNJ Rail livery or will continue to have it's own identity remains to be seen.

   August 2011: I have just learned via Paul Strubeck that the Port Jersey locomotive has been repainted quite recently (like within last few weeks) into the blue - white - red livery as the other two New York New Jersey Rail locomotives are painted. Following that, it has now been seen lettered for Port Jersey.

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..

Leased Locomotives: 2013-2014

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   On or about July 2013, two EMD GP38-2 locomotives were leased from GMTX Locomotive Leasing. GMTX #2202 arrived first and was assigned to Greenville Yard operations in New Jersey.


August 28, 2013 - Greenville, NJ
GMTX 2202 seen with NYCT R156 locomotives being delivered.
courtesy of NYNJ Rail

added 18 February 2014



   In August 2013, GMTX #2213 arrived in Greenville, NJ, but upon being placed into service it was discovered it was not operating properly (battery charging issues?). The locomotive was subsequently returned to GMTX

   A third locomotive, GMTX #2200 arrived to replace #2213. #2200 passed company inspection, and this locomotive was assigned to 65th Street Yard operations in Brooklyn, NY.

   It should also be noted that sometime in late January 2014, another locomotive showed its presence in Brooklyn, NY and thereby adding some confusion and excitement to the history of NYNJ Rail. RSSX #3766, a "LEAF" locomotive, (Lower Emissions And Fuel) a/k/a an ultra low emissions gen-set locomotive. This locomotive is destined for Brookhaven Rail Terminal located on Long Island in Yaphank, NY. After final inspection, the locomotive will be forwarded to its destination, but this locomotive was never leased or purchased by NYNJ Rail and it is merely in transit.

RETURN TO INDEX


Locomotive Photo Index

..

NYNJ 2293

NYNJ 1068

NYNJ 1133

RRPX 563 (leased)

PJRR 1197

GMTX 2200

GMTX 2202 GMTX 2213

2293


Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - May 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - May 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Greenville, NJ - September 2007
In fresh NYNJ "Christmas" livery.

P. F. Strubeck photo

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Greenville, NJ - February 26, 2009
J. Tanksley photo

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Greenville, NJ - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Greenville, NJ - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Greenville, NJ - February 26, 2009
J. Tanksley photo

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1068


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - March 12, 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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1133


Greenville, NJ - March 12, 2006
Waiting on an incoming carfloat.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - September 2007
In front of the enginehouse.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY -September 2007
P. F. Strubeck Photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Spotting an empty  bulkhead flat from Davidson Pipe.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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First Avenue and 42 Street, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Heading to Plywood Specialties.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Making up a train.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Heading down to the float bridge.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Ready to refuel at the diesel pump.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Entering the Bush Terminal Yard from First Avenue & 43rd Street, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
P. F. Strubeck photo

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First Avenue and 50th Street on the float bridge lead, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
P. F. Strubeck photo

.

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July 28, 2009
P. F. Strubeck photo

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50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
P. F. Strubeck photo

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50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
"John P. Brown" with carfloat.
J. Hutnick photo

.

.


50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
Taken from 51st Street.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal Yard - September 21, 2010
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 12 December 2010

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Bush Terminal Yard - September 21, 2010
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 12 December 2010

.


Bush Terminal Yard - September 21, 2010
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 12 December 2010

.


Bush Terminal Yard - September 21, 2010
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 12 December 2010


Bush Terminal Yard - September 21, 2010
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 12 December 2010

.


Bush Terminal - "Bush 2" Float Bridge - May 31, 2011
NYNJ Rail carfloat #16
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

.


Bush Terminal - "Bush 2" Float Bridge - May 31, 2011
(And who says the locomotives stay off the float bridge?)
NYNJ Rail carfloat #16
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

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First Avenue & 51st Street- May 31, 2011
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

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First Avenue & 51st Street- May 31, 2011
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

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First Avenue & 52nd Street- May 31, 2011
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

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First Avenue & 53th Street- May 31, 2011
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

.

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Bush Terminal - "Bush 2" Float Bridge - May 31, 2011
"Charles D. McAllister" with NYNJ Rail carfloat #16
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

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RRPX 563


Greenville, NJ - July 2006
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Greenville, NJ - July 2006
P. M. Goldstein photo

.

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Greenville, NJ - July 2006
P. M. Goldstein photo

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GMTX 2202


August 28, 2013 - Greenville, NJ
GMTX 2202 seen with NYCT R156 locomotives being delivered.
courtesy of NYNJ Rail

added 18 February 2014

1197


February 26, 2009 - Jersey City, NJ

.

.


February 26, 2009 - Jersey City, NJ

.

.


February 26, 2009 - Jersey City, NJ

.

.


February 26, 2009 - Jersey City, NJ

RETURN TO INDEX


New York New Jersey Rail Locomotive Roster

number /
name

builder
model
c/n
build
date
hp

previous
owners


acquired

disposition

notes
1068 EMD SW1500 33152 10/1967 1500 Southern Pacific #2461
Union Pacific Yard #1068
used 2004
National Railway Equipment;
traded 5/06 to Juniata Terminal
for?
 
1133 EMD SW1500 35242 11/1967 1500 Southern Pacific #2549
Union Pacific Yard #1133
New York Cross Harbor #1133
used 2004
National Railway Equipment
transferred to NYNJ Rail 2006 
in service
Brooklyn, NY
repainted blue, white & red
5/2010
 
563 EMD SW1200 18098 5/1963 1200 Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe #2432
Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe #1232 Amtrak #563
leased 5/2006 to 9/2006
from Morristown & Erie
returned to M&E 9/2006  
2293 EMD SW1200 31574 4/1966 1200 St. Louis Southwestern #2293
Ohio Central #2293
BDLX #2293

New York Cross Harbor #2293
used in service
Greenville, NJ
repainted red & green: 9/2007
repainted blue, white, red: 5/2010
GMTX 2200 EMD GP38-2 2000 leased 11/2013 forwarded from Maine assigned to 65th Street,
Brooklyn, NY
GMTX 2202 EMD GP38-2 2000 leased 7/2013 assigned to
Greenville, NJ
GMTX 2213 EMD GP38-2 2000 leased 8/2013 returned
mechanical issues

.

Port Jersey Railroad

1197 EMD SW1200   1966 1200 Missouri Pacific #1197 used in service
Greenville, NJ
repainted blue white & red
2011

Please note:
All locomotives listed in the rosters above are standard gauge (56.5" / 4' 8 ½ ") and are of B-B (four powered axles) wheel arrangement.
.

Roster research by P. F. Strubeck, D. Keller, T. Darnell & P. M. Goldstein

.

RETURN TO INDEX


Marine Equipment

.

Tugboats

   New York New Jersey Rail does not own any tugboats for the transport of carfloats to / from Greenville, NJ or Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY.

   Instead, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey contracts with established towing companies in New York Harbor. The first towing company contracted by PANYNJ was Brown Towing. Currently as of 2011, the contract is assigned to McAllister Towing & Transportation.


50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
The "John P. Brown" of Brown Towing prepares to moor a loaded float to Bush 2.
P. F. Strubeck photo

.

.


Upper New York Harbor - May 3, 2008
The "John P. Brown" taking a loaded float across the upper bay.
P. F. Strubeck photo

.

.


Approaching "Bush 2" - July 28, 2009
P. F. Strubeck photo

.

.


"Charles D. McAllister" with NYNJ Rail carfloat #16 - May 31, 2011
Robbins Reef lighthouse on left.
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

.

.


"Charles D. McAllister" with NYNJ Rail carfloat #16 - May 31, 2011
In front of Statue of Liberty.
P. M. Goldstein photo

added 09 June 2011

.

.

Carfloats:

   Three of the four New York Cross Harbor Railroad carfloats were transferred to New York New Jersey Rail. Unfortunately the fourth carfloat, #30; sunk in January 2006, just prior to the formation of New York New Jersey Rail.

   As of 2011, only two carfloats are known to be in service: #16 and #29 with #16 being used as primary. The disposition of #17 is not known.

   As constructed, carfloats can range from 200 to 350 feet long and each carfloat can hold between 10 to 20 cars, depending on the car lengths and loads.

   As of end of 2012 and following the loss of Carfloat #29 due to Hurricane Sandy, NYNJ Rail commenced in having Weeks barge #278, reconstructed as a carfloat. This is most ironic as Weeks #278 itself was a former carfloat. With the downturn of rail-marine interchange traffic in New York Harbor, it was surplussed and sold to Weeks Marine, the rails removed and pressed into service as a flat top barge. Therefore with this recent refit, it has returned to the duty of which it was originally designed and built for.


NYNJ Carfloat #278 - August 8, 2013
courtesy of NYNJ Rail

added 18 Feb 2014

.

.


NYNJ Carfloat #278 - August 8, 2013
courtesy of NYNJ Rail

added 18 Feb 2014

New York New Jersey Rail Carfloat Roster

number
builder
build
date
length width

previous
owner


disposition

notes
16 290' 41' New York Dock in service "11 car capacity"
rehabilitated in 1998 with new rail.
refurbished in 2009
17 290' 41' New York Dock unknown
29 360' 41' New York, New Haven & Hartford sunk 2012 sunk 1987, refloated
completely overhauled in 1999

sunk 2012 due to Hurricane Sandy
278 354' ex-Weeks acquired 12/2012?
rebuilt 1/2013 to replace #29
inservice
"14 car capacity"

RETURN TO INDEX


Non-Revenue Equipment

.

N5 Class Caboose - Yard Office

   New York New Jersey Rail has inherited a caboose by way of the New York Cross Harbor RR. This caboose, which was used as a Yard Office at Bush Terminal, is now vacant. It was originally a Pennsylvania Railroad N5 class caboose.

   Careful examination by both this author and fellow historian Philip M. Goldstein in July 2007 and again in February 2009 has revealed that this caboose has a layer of red paint and then green paint under the current blue paint. Therefore, this caboose is in all likelihood the caboose formerly used as the master mechanics office of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, and of which was located behind the enginehouse and shops of that railroad at North 8th Street and the East River Bulkhead.

   After acquisition by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad and moved to Bush Terminal, is was painted in the blue livery with the second type of New York Cross Harbor Railroad herald painted on one side of the caboose. Also a deck was added to the east side (facing First Avenue) making sort of a "veranda"; and a steel box was converted into a bar-b-que grill and mounted on the end platform, which can be seen protruding from the right platform in the immediate photo below:


.

New York Cross Harbor Railroad Caboose / Office, Bush Terminal Yard - September 2006
P. F. Strubeck photos

.

.


New York Cross Harbor Railroad Caboose / Office - June 28, 2008
P. M. Goldstein photo

   

RETURN TO INDEX


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this webpage or the author is not affiliated with:
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the New York City Transit Authority,
Metropolitan Transit Authority,
or the City of New York;

.
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and no affiliation or connection with those companies or municipalities is suggested or implied.

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This webpage sees revision for the purpose of the addition of information, or correction of inaccurate data.

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