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New York Cross Harbor

INDUSTRIAL, OFFLINE TERMINAL RAILROADS & RAIL-MARINE OPERATIONS
OF BROOKLYN, QUEENS, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX & MANHATTAN:


NEW YORK CROSS HARBOR RAILROAD
Brooklyn, New York & Greenville, New Jersey

New York Regional Rail Bush Terminal Junction South Brooklyn Sunset Park Greenville New Jersey Street Running

updated:
TUESDAY, 07 FEBRUARY 2017 - 17:32


update summary: date: location
NYCH / LIRR Bogie Chapter expanded 07 February 2017 Bogie Experiment

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INDEX

History

Overview

Properties
Bush Terminal
Brooklyn Army Terminal
65th Street
39th Street
South Brooklyn Marine Terminal
Atlantic Terminal
Fulton Terminal
Brooklyn Navy Yard
Greenville Yard

Customers - Master List
(by terminal)

The Bogie Experiment
NYCH / LIRR
Intermodal "Bogie" experiment

Special Moves
Outbound subway / commuter cars
Inbound subway/ commuter cars
Valley RR 2-8-2 #1647
Inbound Plasser Track Geometry Car
Outbound GP38 & DE/DM30
Heavy Vehicles

Miscellaneous Data

Police Department

Locomotive Overview

Locomotive Liveries
& Heralds

Locomotive Photos

Locomotive Roster

Marine Equipment
Photos & Roster

Non Revenue Equipment
Overview, Photos & Roster

Non Revenue Equipment Photos

Modeling

Memorabilia

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Overview

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   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad was organized in the second week of August 1983, when the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal (BEDT) and New York Dock (NYD) organizations ceased operation the week before.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad was organized for one sole reason, to continue carfloating operations in New York Harbor. Carfloating operations have been a part of New York Harbor since the 1860's, and Brooklyn itself would see its first carfloat operator, Palmer's Dock, in 1876.

   In 1983, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad took control of the properties at Bush Terminal, as well as Atlantic Terminal. The New York Cross Harbor Railroad also acquired all the locomotives and marine equipment (tugboats & carfloats) from each of the predecessor operations (BEDT & NYD), but it would only keep certain pieces of equipment for their operations. Unused marine equipment was sold off, and the undesired remainder of the locomotives were placed on a carfloat, and would be stored at Fulton Terminal before they were sold and / or scrapped.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad would initially operate carfloat service between Bush Terminal (Sunset Park) Brooklyn, NY and Greenville Yard (Jersey City), NJ as well as between the Atlantic Terminal (Downtown Brooklyn) and Greenville Yard.

   The following excerpt is taken from the New York Regional Rail's 2001 filing with the US Securities & Exchange Commissions:

   The Company has historically functioned as a transfer station for freight onto and from the national railroad system. Most of the Company's "bridge traffic" (defined below) or "transfer" freight arrives at its Greenville yard and is destined for points East. The primary commodities that the Company "transferred from West to East, during 2001 and 2000 were forest products, such as paper and lumber, plastic resins, and gases, such as propane and freon.

   The chief commodities that the Company "transferred" from East to West, during 2001 and 2000 were scrap products, such as scrap metal and recycled paper. For the year ended December 31, 2000, cocoa shipments accounted for approximately 45% of NYCH's revenue and was the only commodity that "originated" from NYCH's facilities. Cocoa arrives at the New York ports from the producing countries and is stored for future deliveries.

   Beginning in April 2000, the Company changed the focus of its rail operations. The Company began a multi-phase project that included site clearance, paving and lighting to expand and fully utilize the resources at its Greenville Yard. Previously the Company was only utilizing approximately 7 acres, which contain the Company's track, leaving 15-acres of property unused.

   This project was completed in March 2001 and upon completion, the Company began expanding its terminal facility for transloading, warehousing and distribution activities. Transloading involves the unloading of freight from rail cars onto trucks for delivery or the loading of freight from trucks onto rail cars for shipment. The Company intends to warehouse commodities, expected to be distributed within 30 days from arrival.

   In March 2001, the Company began to set-up transload areas in its yard and signed a multi-year agreement, with Merco Joint Venture, LLC, for the transload of bio-solids. Although this contract terminated shortly thereafter, the Company was able to sign another multi-year agreement, with Unified Services Group, for the transload of bio-solids in June 2001. In August 2001, the Company began to transport freight under this contract. In December 2001, the Company signed an additional multi-year agreement with Transload Services, L.L.C for the transload, warehouse and distribution of structural steel products.

   In March 2002, the Company began to receive carloads of steel for distribution. In March 2002, the Company began the transloading and shipment of additional containerized freight. These transload areas allow the Company to utilize its Greenville Yard more productively and engage the Company's trucking subsidiary, JST, in the operations. The Company anticipates it will be able to continue to grow this facility and to duplicate its successes at its yard in Brooklyn.

   The Company now has four distinct areas of business:

1) Bridge Traffic

At both its terminals, the Company receives rail cars, which are loaded onto float barges, and are ferried by tugboat between Greenville Terminal (NJ) and Bush Terminal Yard (NY).

a) Westbound Freight: Railcars arrive either from local customers or from the Bayridge Junction interchange yard. They are then loaded onto float barges, and are ferried by tugboat to Greenville Terminal where they are sorted for local New Jersey delivery or are interchanged with CSAO for destinations on the national rail network.

b) Eastbound Freight. When the railcars arrive at the Greenville Yard from the national rail network they are loaded onto float barges, and are ferried by tugboat to Bush Terminal where they are sorted for local New York delivery or are interchanged with the NYA for destinations in Long Island or the Northeast.

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2) Transload Operations

At both its terminals, the Company receives rail cars that are destined for transload operation:

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a) Greenville

i) Bio-solids. Rail cars arrive at Greenville Terminal and are set aside on holding tracks. Trucks carrying loaded containers from various locations throughout the City of New York arrive at the Greenville facility where the containers are loaded onto the rail cars by means of a forklift. Empty containers are then placed on the trucks for reloading. Once the rail cars are loaded they are interchanged with CSAO for destinations on the national rail network.

ii) Steel. Loaded rail cars arrive at Greenville Terminal and are set aside on warehouse tracks. Trucks are loaded with the steel using a crane and commence local delivery. Steel is sometimes warehoused for future delivery. Once the rail cars are emptied they are interchanged with CSAO for their reload destination.

iii) Other containerized freight.

(1) Empty rail cars. Rail cars with empty containers arrive at Greenville where they are placed on holding tracks. Trucks with loaded containers are unloaded directly onto the rail cars. The empty containers are then placed on the trucks for reloading. Once the rail cars are completely loaded they are interchanged for final shipping.

(2) Loaded rail cars. Rail cars with loaded containers arrive at Greenville where they are placed on holding tracks. The loaded containers are placed on empty trucks which then set out for their local deliveries. Once the rail cars are emptied they are interchanged with CSAO for their reload destination.

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b) Bush Terminal

i) Pipe. Loaded rail cars arrive at Bush Terminal and are set aside on warehouse tracks. Trucks are loaded with the pipe using a crane and commence local delivery. Pipe is sometimes warehoused for future delivery. Once the rail cars are emptied they are interchanged with CSAO for their reload destination.

ii) Scrap Metal. Empty rail cars arrive at Bush Terminal where they are placed on holding tracks. Truckloads of scrap metal are unloaded into the waiting rail cars by means of a magnetic crane. Once the rail cars are loaded they are interchanged for final shipping.

iii) Lumber. Loaded rail cars arrive at Bush Terminal and are set aside on warehouse tracks. Using a forklift, trucks are loaded with lumber in order to commence local delivery.

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3) Shipside & Dockside

The Company can, by means of its float barges, anchor shipside or dockside for receipt or delivery of various types of cargo. If the cargo is destined for local delivery it can then be ferried to the appropriate terminal for offloading or transported to its final destination.

During 2001, the Company used the shipside method of the transfer of large electrical transformers and regularly uses the dockside method for cocoa.

a) Cocoa- The Company is the "originating" railroad for the majority of the country's supply of Cocoa. Empty rail cars arrive in Greenville where they are loaded onto float barges for ferrying to the Brooklyn docks at Redhook. At Redhook, the Company in conjunction with American Stevedoring and the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey have developed an efficient system whereby the Company's float barges are docked pier-side. Then, using a system of ramps or conveyor belts, the beans are loaded directly from the warehouses. Once loaded they are ferried back to Greenville Terminal and are placed on the national rail network for final destination across the country. During the year ended December 31, 2001, cocoa shipments accounted for 30% of NYCH's revenue.

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4) Local Deliveries

   At both its Greenville and Bush Terminal facilities the Company receives rail cars destined for its local customers in Brooklyn. Rail cars received in Greenville are transported via float barge to Bush Terminal. From Bush Terminal, all rail cars are delivered directly to the Company's rail served customers.

Current Business (at date of filing: 2001)

   Since Conrail's operations were acquired by Norfolk Southern and CSX Transportation in June 1999, both NS and CSX have used the Company more frequently to transport freight between New Jersey and the New York/Long Island areas. The Company believes this trend will continue as the Company continues to prove it has a fast and reliable delivery system able to fulfill their customer's needs.

   As of December 31, 2001, the Company's rail operation had approximately 48 active customers. During the periods listed below the following customers accounted for more than 10% of the Company's revenues from its railroad operations:

Year ending December 31,
2001 2000
Hershey Foods 16% 23%
Bloomer Chocolates 1 9% 16%
Star Corrugated 7% 12%
Unified Services 2 10% *

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Footnotes:

1 = Bloomers main facility was closed during the year due to a fire.
2 = Does not include the JST portion of the revenue.
* = Unified Services began to transport freight via the Company in August 2001.

   The Company's current operating capacity is approximately 2,000 carloads per month. For the month ended February 28, 2002, the Company was transporting approximately 322 carloads per month (a carload refers to one loaded rail car). This is an increase from periods prior to February 28, 2000, when the Company was transporting an average of approximately 290 carloads per month.

   The Company charges between $250 and $1,250 per carload depending upon the length and weight of the railcar, and the type of commodity being shipped. The Company estimates that depending on the mix, it needs to transport at least 300 carloads per month in order to be marginally profitable.

Operating Property & Equipment

   The Company's rail equipment, including leased equipment, consists of the following;

Operational Non-Operational
Locomotives

3

4

Float bridges

2

4

Float barges (carfloats)

3

1

   The Company has approximately 13 miles of track on the New Jersey and Brooklyn waterfronts. All of the Company's track is operational and in good working order.

   Float bridges serve as the rail link between the Company's float barges and the Company's land-based rail tracks.

   Two of the Company's three operational float barges are 40 ft. by 290 ft. and one is 41 ft. by 360 ft. Each float barge contains three rail tracks and can hold between seven and eighteen railcars depending upon the size of the railcars being loaded and the size of the car float used.

   Diesel-fueled locomotives are used by the Company to switch railcars at its Bush Terminal and Greenville facilities. The Company currently leases two (2) locomotives, on a month-to-month basis, from BDL Enterprises, Inc.

   Tugboat services are subcontracted from McAllister Marine Towing & Transportation Company on a monthly basis.

   The Bush Terminal is operated by the Company on a month-to-month permit with New York City. Although this facility is fully operational, it currently operates at less than 10% of its total capacity. The monthly rental of the Bush Terminal is $2,200. (See Note H and Note I of the Financial Statements). The

   Greenville Yard serves as the primary rail car float facility in New Jersey and connects by rail to the Oak Island freight yard in Newark, New Jersey. The Greenville Yard is situated on a one-mile long, 22.14-acre parcel leased to the Company until 2023 at an annual rental rate of $28,825 per year. The lease agreement with Conrail also transferred all real property associated with the operation of the rail yard to the Company for $1.00.

.   In 2006, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad (in name) ceased operation. Following a change of ownership and administrative personnel, the operation would be renamed New York New Jersey Rail, LLC; and carfloating would continue to be part of New York Harbor.

   Now, over a century later; a lot of history is involved. Regardless of the change of name, it is still the last railroad to utilize carfloating operations in New York Harbor!

   If you are interested in the in depth history of Offline Terminal / Common Carrier Railroads that make up the predecessor history of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad / New York New Jersey Rail, please read the pages on: Bush Terminal, New York Dock and Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.

RETURN TO INDEX


History

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New York Cross Harbor Railroad

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad was born "from the ashes" so to say; of the New York Dock and Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal operations. A little back story is necessary at this time to set the stage:

   Both the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal and New York Dock were offline terminal & common carrier railroads operating carfloat service between New Jersey and Brooklyn. Their operations, like that of most of the railroads in the Northeast, had fallen on very hard times the last years of their history due to the advent and increased usage and convenience of containerized truck traffic. As a result, this caused a decrease in Car Load (CL) and Less than Car Load (LCL) railroad freight traffic entering the New York City proper through the New Jersey railyards.

   The Bush Terminal Railroad was originally was acquired by New York Dock in 1972 after Bush Terminal filed for bankruptcy. It was at this time that the City of New York took possession of the Bush Terminal property and subsequently leased the operation to New York Dock. New York Dock officially commenced operation on March 11, 1972.

   In 1976, the formation of Conrail had a very large impact on these two small offline terminal railroads in Brooklyn. As Conrail was not interested in marine operations, the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal was subsequently contracted by Conrail to provide the carfloating services for both themselves and New York Dock; from the Greenville Yard in New Jersey to the respective locations in Brooklyn and vice versa. You can read more of the Conrail contract on the BEDT page of this website.

   In 1978, New York Dock purchased and merged with Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. The details of this purchase / merger can also be read on the BEDT page of this website.

   In the second week of August 1983; both the New York Dock and Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal officially ceased operations. The BEDT Bulk Flour Terminal (on Kent Avenue between North 8th and North 9th Streets) received its last cars this date, (the BFT was one of the BEDT's largest entities). The NYD however, had ceased operations at their Fulton Terminal prior to this, in early 1982.

NEW YORK DOCK RAILWAY -- ABANDONMENT -- KINGS COUNTY. NY

Decided: July 8, l983

By application filed June 3, 1983, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad Terminal Corp. (NYCH) seeks a certificate of public convenience and necessity under 49 U.S.C. 10901 to operate a terminal railroad in the New York, NY area.

NYCH also seeks (1) an exemption to issue securities; (2) a waiver of filing  fees; and (3) a waiver of any public hearing. In addition, NYCH filed a petition on May 3, 1983 seeking waiver of environment and energy data required under 49 C.F.R. 1150.7. In the alternative NYCH seeks an exemption under 49 U.S.C. 10505.

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers (BLE) protests the application. The New York Department of Transportation (NYDOT) has filed comments on the proposal.

Numerous local businesses and governmental bodies have filed letters in support of the proposal.

NYCH seeks authority to conduct a rail and marine service in the Borough of Brooklyn, NY and between Brooklyn, NY and Greenville Yard in Jersey City, NJ. Operations are presently conducted by the New York Dock Railway (NYD). NYD has sought, however, authority to abandon all operations in Docket No. AB-219 (Sub-No. 2), New York Dock Railway Abandonment Kings County.-NY

NYD has agreed to sell assets necessary to conduct the described operations for $1.5 million. The assets include tracks, locomotives, a tug, floats, floatbridges, and shop, work and office equipment. NYD will also lease 4 carfloats to NYCH. NYCH has arranged to lease:

(1) Consolidated Rail Corporation's Greenville yard in Jersey City, NJ
(2) New York City's Brooklyn Army Terminal, Bush Terminal and 65th Street Yard (when completed); and
(3) the Atlantic Terminal owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

   To finance the purchase of New York Dock assets, NYCH has reached an agreement with Northbrook Leasing (Northbrook). Under this agreement, Northbrook will advance $1.5 million to purchase the New York Dock assets. The property will be leased to NYCH for 5 years. At the end of this period NYCH will receive title to the assets from Northbrook for a nominal fee. NYCH has also arranged a loan of $300,000 from the National Bank of North America for working capital. Both agreements will require NYCH to issue promissory notes.

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New York Regional Rail

   In approximately 1996, a new holding company was formed: New York Regional Rail. New York Regional Rail would be the holding company for New York Cross Harbor Railroad; along with JS Transportation.

   JS Transportation was a trucking firm based out of Greenville, New Jersey; which mainly transported loose bulk materials. New York Regional Rail brought along many changes in the New York Cross Harbor operation and acquired new customers as well. One of these significant changes was updating the New York Cross Harbor's railroad operation to NORAC qualifications & standards. 

   In 2006, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad itself would officially become a "Fallen Flag". The new company: Mid Atlantic New England Rail, LLC; based out of West Seneca, NY; purchased and assumed control of New York Cross Harbor Railroad properties and renamed the operation "New York New Jersey Rail, LLC".

   Please visit the following page on this website for information of this current entity of this operation: New York New Jersey Rail

RETURN TO INDEX


Properties

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   Throughout its history, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad would come to operate out of several terminals within the Ports of New York & New Jersey.

LOCATION INDEX

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Brooklyn, NY

Bush Terminal Eastern carfloat terminus, service to several spurs and customers.
Brooklyn Army Terminal Used 1983 - 1993, used for larger car moves.
65th Street Yard Used intermittently, Interchange with LIRR / NY&A.
39th Street Yard Interchange with South Brooklyn Railway.
South Brooklyn Marine Terminal Used frequently during 1990s, now currently under reconstruction.
Atlantic Terminal Ceased operation 1992.
Fulton Terminal Ceased operation 1982, but remained a location for storage of carfloats.
Brooklyn Navy Yard Serviced a rail car builder, service to this location ceased by 1992.

Jersey City, NJ

Greenville Yard Western carfloat terminus - with connection to Conrail Shared Assets Operations (CSX, NS)
Current base of operations

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Bush Terminal

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   Bush Terminal was New York Cross Harbor Railroad's most active terminal and operated in conjunction with Greenville Yard in New Jersey. Bush Terminal is located on the east side of Upper New York Harbor in the Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn. Bush Terminal occupies real estate from the bulkhead on the New York Harbor north to 39th Street, east to Second Avenue, south to 65th Street yard, returning west to the Bulkhead and the Bush Terminal railyard is located west of First Avenue between 50th Street and 43 Streets. Several spurs branch out of the yard and run east up several side streets.

   The following map, which was part of a Transportation System Management Study is not totally accurate, but serves as a general representation of the Bush Terminal Property layout.


P. M. Goldstein collection

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   Paul Strubeck acquired a large scale track schematic of New York Cross Harbor Railroad drawn by "TAB" on April 8, 1988. It reflects trackage both in service (solid line) as well as connected but out of service trackage (broken line) on that date. Clicking on the image below will open a larger image for better legibility.


New York Cross Harbor Track Schematic "TAB drawing" - April 8, 1988
Paul F. Strubeck collection

added 28 January 2016

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The Enginehouse

   The Bush Terminal enginehouse is located at the northwest corner of the yard, off of 43rd Street.


The wall facing First Avenue - unknown date (ca. 1984)
S. Goldstein photo

P. M. Goldstein collection
added 11 June 2010

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   To get into the north end of the Yard, you must access it through the 43rd Street entrance.

   The structure is three tracks wide, of brick construction, and has offices in the rear (north) upstairs portion. To the right (east) of the #3 door, is a small office / workshop.

   A couple of tracks did pass along the west wall of the enginehouse to access a service alley  running parallel to and between First Avenue and the Bulkhead.

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both photos:
Bush Terminal Enginehouse - 2007
P. F. Strubeck

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   Currently, this structure is condemned. Plans for this structure are unknown.

   A large water tower once towered over the west edge of the railyard bearing the lettering "Bush Terminal". However and unfortunately, this water tower was torn down in 1992.

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The Yard


Looking south from the northwest corner of the yard - 2007
The track at the bottom left corner runs north alongside the west wall of the enginehouse into a service alley.
The track directly in front of the caboose is the enginehouse lead.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking southeast at the loading dock and Davidson Pipe area from the northwest corner of the yard - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking southwest at the loading dock - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Looking south from the southeast corner of the yard - 2007
The track at the bottom runs behind the photographer onto First Avenue. The right track runs onto the subway car unloading ramp.
The left track is the yard leads paralleling First Avenue.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Continuing and looking south, we are now past the subway car ramp, with the Davidson Pipe area on the right - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Southeast corner of the yard. Vacant track is float bridge lead in background - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Between the points switch throw, Bush Terminal Yard - March 16, 2010
Some of the spurs to access the industries are located on the east side of First Avenue
but have their turnouts located on the west side of First Avenue just inside the fenced property line of the Yard. 
The close proximity of these turnouts to the fence and other tracks do not provide room for
the customary switchstand set off to the side of the track. So a "low profile between the points" switch throw is used.
This is the same type of low profile switch throw as used on the outer ends of the float bridge
for locomotives to access the center track of a carfloat. This is a Bethlehem Steel model 1222 ground throw.
P. F. Strubeck photo

Float Bridges

   At the foot of 50th Street and at the southwest corner of the railyard, the Bush Terminal property hosts two carfloat aprons (also commonly referred to as float bridges) that the New York Cross Harbor Railroad utilizes for carfloat service to Greenville, New Jersey:  "Bush 1", (the southern float bridge) and "Bush 2" (or the northern float bridge). Both float bridges are located at the foot of 50th Street.. Both float bridges are of pony plate girder construction but are slightly different in construction style: "Bush 1" has tapered girder ends on the outshore end, and "Bush 2" has square ends on the outshore end.


"Bush 1" - November 23, 1983
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 02 May 2012

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   Today only the Bush 2 (the northern float bridge) is in service. Bush 1 is sunk, due to a leaky pontoon:.


"Bush 1" (sunk) - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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"Bush 2" - 2007
Prior to rebuild.
P. F. Strubeck collection

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   In 1998, Bush 2 was redecked with all new bridge timbers and planking. In the summer of 2007, a long overdue and necessary repair, in the form of a brand new steel pontoon was constructed for Bush 2 by the Great Lakes Shipyard of Cleveland, Ohio. This new pontoon was transported by rail in a disassembled state to the rail yard at Greenville. The pontoon was assembled in the water and floated across to the float bridge in Brooklyn, where it was installed.

   Also, in the Fall of 2007 this float bridge would again be redecked and the trackage comprising of the float bridge approach was rebuilt at this time as well:

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"Bush 2" - 2007
After rebuild with new deck and pontoon
P. F. Strubeck photo

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50th Street Float Bridges - June 28, 2008
"Bush 1" in foreground (sunk) "Bush 2" in background.
P. M. Goldstein photo
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"Bush 2" - December 2011
P. F. Strubeck collection
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The disconnected lead to "Bush 1" Float Bridge (behind photographer) - 2007
Bush 2 lead on right, and curves into Bush Terminal Yard.
P. F. Strubeck photo


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Interchanges

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad made this location its base of operations, and operated two interchange points at Bush Terminal:

   The southern interchange point, with the Long Island Rail Road (and subsequently the New York & Atlantic Railway), is located at the former New York New Haven & Hartford Railroad's 65th Street Yard, accessed via the Bay Ridge Branch. Currently this location is administered to and switched by the New York & Atlantic Railway.

   A chapter on the 65th Street Yard can be read below.

   The northern interchange point is located at 39th Street and Second Avenue, and is in conjunction with the South Brooklyn Railway, a freight hauling subsidiary of the New York City Transit Authority, and part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. More about this location can be read on the South Brooklyn Railway page of this website.


"Bush Junction" on Second Avenue between 37th and 39th Streets, Brooklyn, NY - January 2010
Left track is South Brooklyn Railway and leads around CostCo Wholesale Club.
Right tracks is former NYCH / present NYNJ trackage down Second Avenue.
South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard is behind photographer.
Note the flange score marks in the concrete paralleling the NYNJ track. Something derailed here!
P. M. Goldstein photo

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   A separate chapter on the 39th Street Yard can be read below as well.

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Street Trackage

   What makes Bush Terminal unlike any other; is that the trains still run on trackage and routing as Bush Terminal's trains had done since 1905: right down the middle of public streets and almost every day!

   These street tracks are comprised of "girder" rail in the northern portion of trackage (the remaining unrebuilt sections). Girder rail is a special trackage designed for street running, that has a inside guard rail already cast / extruded as part of the rail to protect the flanges of the car wheels, and to prevent derailments. This is the same type of rail to what streetcars and trolleys use to this day. Please see the Glossary for an illustration of this type of rail. In some locations these tracks are still set in the original cobblestone pavers (correctly called "setts") dating back to 1905.

   As most of the trackage used by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad and now the New York New Jersey Rail is in the street, it does not take a stretch of imagination to realize the inconveniences encountered with vehicular traffic and rail operations sharing the same space.


First Avenue & 41st Street - June 11, 2007
Looking north.

P. F. Strubeck photo

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An older photo of the same location at the intersection of Second Avenue and 41st Street - unknown date
Looking west down 41st Street towards First Avenue from Second Avenue.
#59 is pulling a string of IND R10's to be sent out to Naparano in Newark, NJ for scrapping.
With the construction of the First Avenue track access into the 39th Street Yard, this unique trackage
and photogenic curve will no longer be used.
Wayne Koch photo

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   Paul Strubeck took an extensive walking tour of the line, taking images as he walked.

   These images show in great detail the street trackage, turnouts and sidings to many of the current and former customers. Due to the quantity of images, they have been placed on their own subpage. A link at the bottom of that page will return you here:

New York Cross Harbor Railroad Street Trackage at Bush Terminal


Customer Master List, by location

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Bush Terminal & Brooklyn Army Terminal

consignee

location

commodity

time

notes
American Edible Oil        
American Stevedoring 39th Street Yard cocoa beans 1992? - 2001? operation later done dockside
Atlantic Waste 50th & First Ave. garbage 199_? - 1999?  
Balbo Oil        
Cropsey Metal & Recycling Bush Terminal Yard scrap metal 199_? - 2005?  
Davidson Pipe Bush Terminal Yard pipe 1994 - Current? cars originally went c/o South Brooklyn
Railway; now uses Bush Terminal Yard
East Peak Trading unknown rice unknown  
F. & V. Churillo        
Federation Warehousing Corp.        
Franklin Polymers 47th & Second Ave. plastic pellets 198_? - 2007? company under new ownership
Gusseo Manufacturing        
Hercules Corrugated Box Manufacturing Co.   cardboard boxes    
Interdynamics shop alley R134a refrigerant 198_? - 2006?  
Merco Joint Venture Bush Terminal Yard bio-solids (sewage sludge) 3/2001-
6/2001
short lived contract, new contract signed
with Unified Services
Midwood Lumber 54th & First Ave. lumber 199_? current consignee, originally had own siding,
now utilizes yard
MVP Warehousing shop alley rice 1994 - 1996  
New York City
Transit Authority
c/o SBK Rwy. @
39th & Second
subway cars, track material 1983 - 2006?  
New York Piggyback Brooklyn Army Terminal      
New York Railcar Corp Brooklyn Army Terminal    
Plywood Specialties 40st & First Avenue lumber / building materials 198? - 2005? siding now used by another consignee
Quiltex Co. Inc.        
S & E Building Supply        
Safety Kleen Bush Terminal Yard waste oil 1993 - ?  
Sano-Cup Corp.        
Thrifty Paper        
Unified Services Bush Terminal Yard bio-solids (sewage sludge) 6/2001 - 7/2001  
Vesuvio Foods unknown unknown unknown  
Yi Pin Bush Terminal Yard pre packaged chinese food condiments   former Plywood Specialties

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Atlantic Terminal

Bowater Paper Co.        
Dykes Lumber Co. lumber & building products       
Jakes Products        
Paul Markesano & Son's sand, gravel      
John Markesano Trucking       (possibly the "son" in Markesano & Sons)
Schoenberg Salt Co.        
Universal Maritime Co.        

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Brooklyn Navy Yard

Mitsui & Co. Inc.        
Nemco Inc.        
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Greenville, NJ

Transload Services west end of
Greenville Yard
transload, warehouse & structural steel distribution 12/2001 -
3/2002

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Dockside & Direct from Carfloat Customers

American Stevedoring Red Hook Pier 7 & 8 coffee & cocoa bean importing 2002-2006
Domino Sugar East River, Brooklyn liquid sugar in tank trailers on flatcars
sugar refining
1989 one time delivery
unknown scrap metal yard Newtown Creek, Queens scrap metal loaded into gondolas 1984?

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    In March 2001, the Company began to set-up transload areas in its yard and signed a multi-year agreement, with Merco Joint Venture, LLC, for the transload of bio-solids.

   Although this contract terminated shortly thereafter, the Company was able to sign another multi-year agreement, with Unified Services Group, for the transload of bio-solids in June 2001.

   In August 2001, the Company began to transport freight under this contract.

   In December 2001, the Company signed an additional multi-year agreement with Transload Services, L.L.C for the transload, warehouse and distribution of structural steel products.

   In March 2002, the Company began to receive carloads of steel for distribution.

   In March 2002, the Company began the transloading and shipment of additional containerized freight. These transload areas allow the Company to utilize its Greenville Yard more productively and engage the Company's trucking subsidiary, JS Trucking, in the operations.


In Depth Customer Descriptions

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South Brooklyn Railway

   The freight subsidiary of the New York City Transit Authority, interchanges with New York Cross Harbor Railroad at the South Brooklyn Railway's 39th Street & 2nd Avenue Yard. See below for more info.

      The New York Cross Harbor Railroad used to bring freight cars or subway cars to the 39th Street Yard, at which point the South Brooklyn Railway hauls the item to its respective destination within the transit system. 

   The majority of freight that was shipped by rail (in most cases subway cars), that was destined for the New York City Transit Authority, came in via the New York Cross Harbor Railroad and their float bridges until circa 1994; when the trackage on Second Avenue and 39th Street a/k/a "Bush Junction" was reconstructed.

   Alledgely, the reconstruction of the curve restricted car lengths to around 50', so the average subway car (which is 70' to 80' in length) could not negotiate the curve. Whether this is fact or fiction is not known, but the fact remains that no new subway cars have transversed this trackage into the 39th Street Yard since 1994, but outbound subway cars for scrapping did use Bush Junction until circa 2003.

   Track material shipments were unaffected and continued to use the street trackage until circa 2004.

   Currently the interchange is unused, as the turnout on First Avenue and 41st Street was welded into the Plywood Specialties position, thereby isolating the 41st Street and Second Avenue routing.

   For more information on this railroad and operation please click here: South Brooklyn Railway

Interdynamics

   This customer is north of 42nd Street (one block north of the enginehouse), and received R134A refrigerant for distribution.

   This customer is no longer in occupancy.


Interdynamics Service Alley - 2007
Looking north from 42nd Street
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 02 May 2012

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MVP Warehousing

   At one point this customer used to receive car load boxcars of rice. This customer was also located north of the shops. This customer went out of business in 1996.


MVP Warehousing siding - 2006
Looking north from 43rd Street
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 02 May 2012

Plywood Specialties

   Located at 40th Street & First Avenue, this customer (no longer in presence) received "centerbeam" bulkhead flatcars loaded with plywood, as well as boxcars of building materials.

Yi Pin Food Specialties

   As of circa 2003, a different customer, Yi Pin Food Products; utilizes this siding and receives boxcars of bagged rice. For those of you who are fans of Chinese food (yum!), the little packages of duck sauce, hot mustard and soy sauce come from this distributor!


Yi Pin / Plywood Specialties siding at First Avenue & 40th Street - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Midwood Lumber

   Located at 50th Street & First Avenue. A spur siding was constructed, but was rarely used.

   When constructed, this siding it was designed with very sharp radii, and it is difficult for modern length freight cars to negotiate the curve.

East Peak Trading

   Received boxcars of rice.

Merco Joint Ventures

   Beginning in 1992, New York Cross Harbor Railroad received a new freight consignee, Merco Joint Ventures.

   Merco was a third party contractor that removed the sewage sludge from City of New York sewage treatment plants. During the first few weeks of this operation, the semi-solid sludge was loaded in 20' sealed containers in which the New York Cross Harbor Railroad would then load onto their own 89' flat cars. Soon after this however,  TTCX 60' flat cars were used.

   In 1993, the flat cars would somewhat be replaced by new cars, called "WastePackers". These cars were developed by Johnstown America Freight Car Company. WastePackers were a two unit articulated spine car, in which three 20' containers can be loaded for each half of the car, thus increasing productivity.

   In transition between the TTCX flat cars and the "WastePackers", articulated "ULTRA" stack cars from Epic were used. These ULTRA cars were very similar in design to WastePacker cars. Merco's WastePacker cars used "MERX" reporting marks, and the containers themselves bore "MJVU" reporting marks.

    The loading operation would eventually be moved to Greenville circa 1998, and operated until 2001 at which time the City of New York canceled their contract with Merco. At this time, East Carbon Development Corporation Environmental a/k/a "ECDC Environmental" operated the contract until around 2006 (presumably to finish out the contract). At this same time, the majority of the MERX cars went to ECDC.

    New York Cross Harbor would transport the full containers from Brooklyn to Greenville. The cars would be loaded in Bush Terminal, floated to Greenville and then interchanged with Conrail. Only five of the articulated cars could fit on the 290' floats and seven cars on the 360' floats.

   These loads ultimately wound up in Texas, at the Sierra Blanca Sludge Ranch where it would be spread out as fertilizer.

Atlantic Waste

   At 51st Street & First Avenue: there was a waste disposal firm located here. This location is of note, as the cars ran between two buildings located to either side of a sharp curve with extremely limited clearances.

   This customer employed the use of a fleet of 60' ECOX boxcars. Service to this customer ended in the late 1990's.


Atlantic Waste - 50th Street & First Avenue - January 2012
(First Avenue in foreground)
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 02 May 2012

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Franklin Polymers

   Located on 47th Street and Second Avenue, this track would cut through the corner of the junk yard on the corner of 47th Street. The track would then head east and cross Second Avenue and enter into a building.

   This customer received plastic pellets for injection molding, and it is believed this firms' primary product was plastic bags.

   Direct service to this customer ended on an as yet unknown date, and this customer would then draw off its load within the Bush Terminal Yard.

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Safety Kleen

   Safety Kleen had a loading and transfer facility at Bush terminal Yard. To call this a facility would be an overstatement because it was more of a vertical standpipe with a quick / connect hose fitting for loading tankcars with waste oil.


Safety Kleen loading pipe & platform - January 2012
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 02 May 2012

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Davidson Pipe

   Davidson Pipe would receive gondolas of pipe via New York Cross Harbor Railroad which would place the cars in the South Brooklyn Railway's 39th Street Yard (between First & Second Avenues). Then, the South Brooklyn Railway would move the gondolas from their 39th Street Yard into Davidson's Pipe Yard located across Second Avenue between Second & Third Avenues.

   In 1994, Davidson Pipe downsized and sold this property to Costco, the wholesale club. Davidson would continue to receive gondolas and bulkhead flatcars of pipe, but they would now be unloaded within the Bush Terminal Yard.


Bush Terminal Yard - Davidson Pipe Area - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

Various Customers in Bush Terminal Yard

   In the main yard, there are customers who receive cars at this location, including Davidson Pipe, Midwood Lumber, Franklin Polymers and Cropsey Metals. Also located in the northeastern end of the yard, is a paved ramp which was used to unload subway cars that arrived on flatcar for the New York City Transit Authority.


Bulk plastic pellet transfer at Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - July 28, 2009
Looking south. Note the subway car unloading ramp leading up to end of covered hopper car.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Brooklyn Army Terminal

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  The Brooklyn Army Terminal would see intermittent operation from 1983 through 1992(?).


Brooklyn Army Terminal from the cab of NYCH #21 - January 1990
(LIRR locomotives picking up Valley RR #1647 in background)
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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   In 1981, a portion of the yard was reconstructed by New York Dock to include the installation of a pontoon type float bridge in the northwest corner of the yard.

   Allegedly, the reason for this float bridge installation, was to ease congestion of Bush Terminal, and to be able to the handle longer railcars gaining use by the Class 1 railroads. This explanation leaves a little to be desired, and one only needs to reference photographs of the Bush Terminal Yard throughout the 1980's and 1990's to see the large amount of unoccupied trackage. And, the radius of the approach trackage to the float bridge at 50th Street does not appear to hinder the longer freight cars currently in service and being brought in to and shipped out from the Bush Terminal Yard.

   Documents and schematics of transportation studies obtained by Philip M. Goldstein in 2008, both independently of and from Tom Flagg; reflect the actual intention of this float bridge's installation was the fact that during the reconstruction of First Avenue, the Brooklyn Army Terminal and customers south of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad's float bridges at 50th Street, would be isolated while the street trackage was under reconstruction..

   While the following blueprint predates the organization of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad, it bears out the reason for installation of the Brooklyn Army Terminal float bridge. You may click on the image below for a enlarged version. Use the back arrow on your web browser to return you here.


City of New York, Department of Transportation - Bureau of Highway Operations
"Reconstruction of First Avenue from 58th Street to 39th Street - Borough of Brooklyn"
"Temporary Transfer Bridge & Connection at Brooklyn Army Terminal"
(no date - ca. 1980)
courtesy of T. Flagg

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   This pontoon float bridge installed at the Brooklyn Army Terminal was transplanted from the Erie Railroad 's 28th Street Freight Station on the west side of Manhattan:


Army Terminal Float Bridge (ex-Erie West 28th Street Terminal Float Bridge) - August 14, 1998
Looking west-northwest.
John McCluskey photo

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   While operations at this yard would simplify interchange with the Long Island Rail Road, and subsequently the New York & Atlantic Railway, operations at this location would never reach their full potential and after several years, the location would be abandoned (and presumably after the reconstruction of First Avenue was completed). 

   With the construction of the new overhead suspension floatbridge immediately south in the 65th Street, this small yard & float bridge was superfluous.


Brooklyn Army Terminal Float Bridge (& 65th Street Yard & proposed Float Bridges)
P. M. Goldstein collection

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   Today this floatbridge is now half sunk and it pulled away from it's bulkhead anchors. The land side (not having a pontoon and thus not buoyant) is underwater, but the pontoon is still watertight, so that end actually still floats. (Usually, it is the pontoon that usually leaks from age, and sinks):



Army Terminal Float Bridge (ex-Erie West 28th Street Terminal Float Bridge) - July 2006
Looking northwest.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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   This float bridge, when it was in service, was referred to as the "Army Terminal Bridge".

    

   

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65th Street Yard

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   The 65th Street Yard is located at the foot of 65th Street and Second Avenue, just south of Brooklyn Army Terminal. The 65th Street Yard was formerly operated by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in conjunction with the Long Island Rail Road (Bay Ridge Division). It was then taken over by the Penn Central Railroad in January 1969. The 65th Street Yard was once home to four electrically powered cable suspended float bridges. In 1970 these four float bridges were dismantled and the yard was little used. Conrail absorbed Penn Central in 1976.

      To get to the 65th Street Yard and interchange, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad has to maneuver through the Brooklyn Army Terminal, of which the trackage runs down the middle of First Avenue.

   The 65th Street Yard was never actually owned or operated by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad, but in fact this location is under the control of the Long Island Rail Road and the New York & Atlantic Railway, (being the contracted freight carrier for the Long Island Rail Road).

   While it never came to fruition, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad once planned to relocate its base of operations to the 65th Street Yard, and thus a brand new pair of cable suspended floatbridges were built at this location in 1999, ironically on the site of the previous four float bridges of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad.

   But alas, this relocation never took place, and the new bridges still sit as built and unused:


65th Street Yard Float Bridges - July 2006
Looking west.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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39th Street Yard

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   The 39th Street Yard is a property at the northern most end of Bush Terminal. This yard is located between First & Second Avenues, and between 39th Street and 37th Streets.


South Brooklyn Railway 39th Street Yard - September 2007
Looking west.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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  The 39th Street Yard is the interchange location for New York Cross Harbor Railroad / New York New Jersey Rail and the South Brooklyn Railway. This location is also known as Bush Junction, a name that dates back to early Bush Terminal Railroad operations.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad transported materials much as ties, rail and other railroad related supplies to this yard, for transfer to the New York City Transit Authority. The New York Cross Harbor Railroad also once hauled scrap subway cars from this location for loading on a carfloat for transportation to a scrapper located in New Jersey, as well as placed new / rebuilt subway cars just arriving from the mainland US, for transfer to the New York City Transit Authority.

   As stated, the 39th Street Yard was rebuilt and this reconstruction eliminated the old interchange switch on 2nd Avenue, and now only cars 50 feet and under can be moved here via New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

   In 2003, the New York City Economic Development Corporation, in conjunction with the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey put forth a proposal to improve the rail access of the 39th Street Yard and to develop the property north of that yard. One of the proposals contained an automobile loading / unloading facility.  

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South Brooklyn Marine Terminal

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   The piers west of the 39th Street Yard are known as the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal.

   Strangely, rail service to this pier was not provided by the South Brooklyn Railway as one would expect, but by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad which would have to pass through the 39th Street Yard of the South Brooklyn Railroad to enter the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal. By the way, the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal is not affiliated with the South Brooklyn Railway.

   It is also now understood that the 39th Street Yard is no longer associated with the South Brooklyn Railway / New York City Transit Authority / Metropolitan Transportation Authority and belongs to the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal.

   While it appears the South Brooklyn Railway will still have access via the 39th Street route (around the Costco property), the yard will be serviced by New York New Jersey Rail via a new track access located on First Avenue & 39th Street (see 2007 proposal below).

   The following is an excerpt located in the New York State Department of Transportation non-NYSDOT Economic Recovery Act / Tiger pre-application online archives. This "pre-application" was submitted by the New York City Economic Development Corporation.

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2003 Proposal

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   The current property proposals and plans for trackage (which are presently [2011] under construction) can be viewed on the New York New Jersey Rail page of this website.

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.American Stevedoring

   American Stevedoring received raw cocoa beans via ship and transferred the product to freight cars, which were loaded in the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (which is located west of the South Brooklyn Railway Yard at Second Avenue & 39th Street).

   American Stevedoring would load the hopper cars with a conveyor, thus causing the carfloat to list very badly on occasion. Often, the cocoa beans were pre-bagged, and loaded directly into boxcars. Bagged cocoa loading used to take place at the 39th Street Yard. Deep sea vessels used the berth at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal until 2002, when structural issues precluded the use of the bulkhead at this location and prevented large vessels from mooring there.

   American Stevedoring moved their operation to the Red Hook Container Terminal. Here, cocoa would be transferred directly from deep sea vessels to boxcars which were loaded on a carfloat. (Modern day lighterage service!) 

   In January 2006, a carfloat was tied up at this pier with loaded hoppers, when the carfloat developed a leak and consequently sunk, taking the hopper cars with it. Thus three or so hoppers were seen floating in the East River for a few days:


Bobbing for cocoa - January 2006
Red Hook Marine Terminal.
Looking west.

unknown photographer
New York Times photo

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   The cocoa unloading operation has since been moved out of New York State to Philadelphia, PA; and this dockside work is no longer done.

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Domino Sugar

   Another customer that received dedicated carfloat service was Domino Sugar on the East River by the Williamsburg Bridge. However, this dedicated carfloat service operation only took place two or three time before service was discontinued.

   Domino Sugar was the successor to American Sugar Refining which in turn was known previously as Havemeyer & Elder. Prior to New York Cross Harbor Railroad service, Domino (and it predecessors) would be stalwart customers of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal.

   During New York Cross Harbor Railroad service, Domino Sugar would receive carfloats with Trailer On Flat Car (TOFC) cars onboard the carfloat, that held tank trailers of liquid sugar.

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Atlantic Terminal

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   The Atlantic Terminal, located in the Atlantic Basin, was also property that was formerly New York Dock.

   The Atlantic Basin is located north of Bush Terminal, right off of Ferris Street. Atlantic Terminal serviced a series of public Team Tracks as well as some customers.


P. M. Goldstein collection
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   Those customers utilizing the Atlantic Terminal received cars such as tank cars of corn syrup, as well as covered hoppers of salt & sugar.

   Service at the Atlantic Terminal ended in 1992, but remained unchanged for many years. Within the last 10 years however, the location was reconstructed as a passenger ship terminal, the float bridge (a pony plate girder) was removed in approximately 2005 and its disposition is unknown. Nothing remains of the railroad operation there:  


Atlantic Terminal - February 28, 1990
Looking north at #21 switching in the Atlantic Terminal and on the float bridge.
Carl G. Perelman photos

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Atlantic Terminal - 1997
Looking north-northwest at the Atlantic Terminal float bridge.
John McCluskey photo

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Atlantic Terminal - 2010
Looking southwest at the former Atlantic Terminal float bridge bulkhead.
Note the "new" Willis Avenue swingbridge in background.
P. F. Strubeck photo
added 02 May 2012

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Fulton Terminal

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   Fulton Terminal was never actually a New York Cross Harbor Railroad owned or operated piece of property, but the Fulton Terminal was a former New York Dock property.

   The Fulton Terminal comprised of an enginehouse, a small yard and two pontoon float bridges.

   Fulton Terminal was the location where New York Cross Harbor Railroad stored their tugboats for a period of time, and also where the "Roster on a Barge" (excess locomotive units) was stored.


"Roster On A Barge"
Fulton Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 21, 1984
unknown photographer
P. M. Goldstein collection

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   Today Fulton Terminal remains in an abandoned / derelict state but portion of the site are under reconstruction.


Fulton Terminal Pier Yard and south float bridge - August 2006
Looking west-northwest.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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 As of June 1, 2010; the pier has almost totally collapsed.

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Brooklyn Navy Yard

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   Another location serviced by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad was the New York Naval Shipyard a/k/a the "Brooklyn Navy Yard".

  Located here is a float bridge, and at one point a massive yard / track structure. This location was formally serviced by the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal from 1941 through ca. 1983. The Navy Yard had just a single carfloat apron, and an interesting one at that.

   This float bridge was of the contained apron type, also known as a "French" style; and was an electrically powered overhead suspension bridge. Later on, it was converted to a pontoon float bridge in 1977 but the overhead gantry was left standing.


Brooklyn Navy Yard float bridge - April 28, 2012
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 02 May 2012

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   New York Cross Harbor Railroad received a contract to operate in the Brooklyn Navy Yard in the late 1980's, delivering cars to a subway / electric multiple unit car assembler (rebuilder?): NemCo (believed to stand for NorthEast Motorcar Co). This customer was switched once a week. Service ended by 1992 and once the contract ended, so did service to this facility.

   Today the float bridge apron and gantry is still intact, but most of the trackage is gone.

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Greenville Yard

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   The railyard at Greenville, NJ, is located in Jersey City, New Jersey, and is the westernmost point of interchange of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad / New York New Jersey Rail. It is currently the base of operations and house a modest trailer which is used as offices for management personnel.

   Greenville Yard, including the float bridges; was originally constructed by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1904 when the PRR outgrew it's Harsimus Cove Yard (somewhat north on the New Jersey shoreline). In it's heyday, this yard was huge. But perhaps what is most interesting is that Greenville Yard rests atop a man-made peninsula.

   The original Greenville float bridges and support structures were made of all wood, but following a massive fire in 1931; they were rebuilt in steel to prevent a repeat of the conflagration. Greenville Yard now featured six pony plate girder electrically powered cable suspension float bridges, numbered 9 ½ through 14.

   Greenville Yard as originally constructed, also featured such apparatus as a hump yard, outbound / inbound yards, car repair facilities and even a steel staging area for New York City building construction.

   As mentioned above, after Conrail took over Class 1 operations in 1976; is did not want to involve itself in marine operations. Therefore, the carfloating operations were contracted out to Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal in 1976.

   Following the cessation of operations of Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal / New York Dock in 1983, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad received the lease on Greenville from Conrail.


An old sign on the main entrance road to Greenville Yard - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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   It was said that part of a revised agreement in 1983, that Conrail would maintain the yard and floatbridges in Greenville, with New York Cross Harbor Railroad doing the switching and carfloat work.

   However, after two float bridges collapsed (#13 & 14 or the southernmost two) around 1991 and with Conrail refusing to repair them, ownership of the float bridges and structures, along with the floating rights were transferred to New York Cross Harbor Railroad, but the land remains Conrail Shared Assets owned. See the float bridge chapter for more information.

   Most of the float bridges are still there, albeit in various states of disrepair; except for #11 which is in service at this time. Number 11's outer apron was replaced in 1994, and numbers 13 and 14 which were dismantled in 1997, following the partial collapse of the suspension gantry.


Note that this shows 12 Bridge as operational!
As 12 Bridge was operational until 1992, this map and the others as part of the TSM Study must predate that year.
P. M. Goldstein collection

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   Tracks were numbered in Greenville as following: 12-3 (southern most), 12-2, 12-1, 11-4, 11-3, 11-2, 11-1 and the Crane Track. Greenville is currently comprised of approximately 27 acres.

   Greenville itself never really had any customers other than being a transload operation until 2006; at which time a new consignee would receive boxcars filled with hay on the Crane Track. This customer is still in operation and received this commodity to this day.


Greenville Float Bridges - February 26, 2009
Looking northeast.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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10 Bridge (foreground w/ round corners)
with 9 ½ Bridge (background w/ square corners) - February 26, 2009
Note the construction differences and "newer" appearance of 9 1/2 Bridge counterweights & gantry.
This is because 9 ½ Bridge was installed after 10 through 14 Bridges were originally installed, and is in fact newer.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Close up of 10 Bridge Bulkhead Anchor & Pivot - February 26, 2009
Note the position of 9 ½ Bridge in background: it is pulled out of its pivot box and a portion of the pivot wheel can be seen.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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10 / 11 Bridge gantry support girders - February 26, 2009
Note the scoring effects of the wave action. The upper left support base is completely undermined
and the bottom right is nearly so with only a small diameter of concrete remaining!
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 / 12 Bridge gantry support girders - February 26, 2009
A very well designed reconstruction of the support girder base. Under the cut stone block are 12 x 12 creosoted bridge timbers.
This will undoubtedly last significantly longer than the cast concrete bases shown previously in the 10 / 11 gantry support image.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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10 Bridge Apron - February 26, 2009
Note
9 ½ Bridge apron at the opposite angle in background. It is still attached to and suspended by the apron counterweight cables.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge - July 2006
The only float bridge in Greenville currently in operation.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge bulkhead anchor box & pivot wheel - February 26, 2009
Does anyone doubt the corrosive effects of salt water?
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge operators cabin & gantry access stairs - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Close up of the 11 Bridge operators window which has been retrofitted into the original window sashes - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge eyebar (to worm drive) and cable suspension (to counterweights) - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge - February 26, 2009
Showing electric hawser winch drum, apron counterweights, manual hawser winch, counterweight cable with anchor and toggle.
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge apron dampening cylinder - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge apron / bridge hinges - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge apron showing toggles and rail alignment ratchet - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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close up of 11 Bridge rail alignment ratchet - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge electric hawser winch drum - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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11 Bridge manual hawser winch and toggle - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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12 Bridge (out of service) - February 26, 2009
P. M. Goldstein photo

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Bogie Experiment

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The Intermodal Bogies

   The Bogies are a set of experimental Intermodal cars that were used by the Long Island Rail Road in the late 1980’s through the early 1990’s. The entire purpose of these cars was to be able to introduce Intermodal type services to businesses located on Nassau & Suffolk Counties on Long Island. The reason that it took so long to offer this intermodal type service was the fact that LI (and much of the East Coast) is plagued with some very low clearances which will not accept the traditional double stack containers (COFC) or trailer on flat car (TOFC) services. Traditional Intermodal well type cars will not clear the electrified 3rd Rail adjacent to the tracks for commuter trains as well.

   The biggest obstacle on Long Island being the bridges in Mineola. The use of the Bogies solved this problem. This is somewhat ironic being that LIRR helped to pioneer Intermodal in the 1800’s by placing wagons on flat cars destined for New York City. In the late 1980’s, LI was in a crisis of overloaded roads and something had to be done…

   The Intermodal Bogie concept was developed in the late 1970's, by a company known as Intermodal Concepts, Inc. Intermodal Concepts under George B. Kirwan, developed a small, two axle bogie, where a truck trailer would be backed onto a car, using a small ramp. The trailer would be supported, and another car would be rolled into place and connected with a normal  fifth wheel hitch. A small set of these cars were built, however information is extremely scarce about them. Research on these original cars is ongoing.

Original ICI Bogie Patent

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

   In early 1988 under Dan Cleary, the Freight General Manager of LIRR, the Freight Division of the Long Island Rail Road was looking to expand its freight marketing and start moving intermodal trailers. By this time, Intermodal Concepts had developed a new, more refined set of bogies on the drawing board, which used a crane to place the trailers onto the cars, instead of having the truck itself perform the complicated task of backing the trailer onto the car.

   The Berwick Freight Car Company of Berwick, Pennsylvania (then a subsidiary of Chicago West Pullman Heavy Industries) were contracted to build the first cars. Berwick was a known freight car builder with a line of well known box cars and would later develop the ULTRA (universal load, twin railcar, articulated) containerized waste cars in 1991. The Bogies were LIRR's grand plan to help bring back a more marketable freight service to Long Island. Due to the nature of the cars (we will get into more detail about this later on), the cars were not really intended for interchange service with other railroads.

   LIRR set up a permanent terminal at the Pinelawn Team Track just east of Farmingdale, and a not so permanent facility at the Garden City Team Track on the Garden City Secondary. The western terminus would be located on the property of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad in Greenville Yard, in New Jersey. New York Cross Harbor RR became the “partner” for the Bogie service. The Bogies would be loaded by NYCH in NJ, carfloated to the New York side of the harbor, and interchanged with the LIRR in Brooklyn's Bay Ridge / 65th Street Yard. This would be the only route the cars would ever take.

   The first batch of cars, and the pair of custom unloading cranes were completed by April 1988. Berwick held the title on this equipment, and leased them to LIRR for testing. The first batch consisted of twelve cars, which were bought to Greenville, NJ loaded on flatcars, and subsequently offloaded there. The goal of leasing instead of selling outright the bogies first was to see if there was enough demand for the service, and/or to develop marketing for it.

    The cars were unlike anything ever built at the time, featuring some very sleek lines on a very low profile, yet had a heavily built chassis. What made these cars interesting was the fact that the trailer body itself became an important part of the unit. The trailer would be loaded so that the pin on the front would be in a fifth wheel hitch, and the wheels would be in a set of pockets on the next car, thus the center of the trailer would be “floating” over the rail.

Second Bogie Patent (for which the prototype LIRR cars were built off of)

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Customers

   The bogies initial run was in July of 1988. The first customer being the Town of Hempstead waste incinerator in Garden City, NY. Incinerator ash, being handled by Interstate Bi-Modal, was loaded in 20' open top containers on a trailer chassis, and were loaded on the bogies using a truck mounted crane. The trailers were lifted by crane using a normal spreader bar setup attached to the boom, which is oddly enough painted the exact same color blue as the cars. It is possible this was part of the order for loading the cars in remote areas.

   At the same time of delivery, the cars were being used by Multimodal of New Jersey, who was a shipping broker for small trucking outfits. These cars were also loaded in Garden City, NY and later in Pinelawn, NY as well. When the operation was moved full time to Pinelawn and the unloader was set up, the US Postal Service came on as a user, of whom shipped mail. USPS was a customer until one of the loaded trailers which had been left overnight on one of the interchange tracks, was set on fire. The last known customer was Clare Rose Distributors, a LI based beverage dealer. Clare Rose was the last active consignee to use the service, that being until December 1991. Clare Rose apparently had a few bad run ins with the service. First, a loaded trailer of beer was dropped in Greenville Yard, causing serious damage to the load. The second, a loaded trailer of empty bottles on the return trip west was struck and ruptured on the interchange tracks in Brooklyn, scattering empty bottles everywhere.

The Different Types

There were three different kinds of Bogie cars, as outlined below:

#8000 series:

These were designated end cars, featuring a standard height tight lock (Type H) coupler and a set of cast steel counterweights to offset the weight of the trailer on the other end, and a fifth wheel hitch on the other end. This was followed by a lower then normal height Type E coupler on the opposite end of which it's purpose was to move sets of unloaded/empty bogies.

Following an 8000 series bogie in the train, would be a 1000 series car.

#1000 series:

These were the designated intermediate cars. These had lower height Type E couplers on both ends. The reason for the lower coupler height was so that a 1000 series car could never be coupled to a standard freight car. 

On the “A End”, or front of the car, would be a well in which the axle sets from the first road trailer would sit in. On the “B End”, or rear of the car, was a fifth wheel hitch for the next trailer. The wheel wells featured a spring loaded chock mechanisms, which kept the tires locked in at all times. These wheel wells were pretty interesting in the fact that the entire wheel well assembly was able to pivot slightly, so that the car could negotiate curves better with a loaded trailer.

Following the 1000 Series car in the train (in actuality there would be several, but were going to skip to the end here) would be a 9000 Series bogie.

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

#9000 series:

These cars had a low height Type E coupler on the “A End", and a normal height, Type H tight lock coupler on the "B" or rear end. The front had a set of wells for the last road trailer's tires to sit in. This unit is essentially the opposite of the front 8000 series car.

   In service, the normal configuration of bogies would be to have the following cars in a train:

80xx - 10xx - 10xx - 10xx - 10xx - 90xx

   This allows for one set to accommodate up to five road trailers.

  All of the cars did have some similarities throughout their design. Each car had its own braking system, a standard freight car AB brake set. Handbrakes were the standard Ajax brake wheel, located on the “B” end of each car. Due to the fact that the cars would essentially be stretched out, the air brakes had to be connected by a long flexible hose. Each car had its own retractable reel (think of a retractable drop light) with a brake hose wound on it mounted on the car. The original cars had them mounted under the fifth wheel, with the second order of bogies having larger red hose reels mounted on the side of the car opposite the brake wheel. On the cars with the wells for the wheels, they were pretty standard with a wedge designed to keep the trailer from moving around. This also was refined on the second order of cars and the first order of cars were subsequently modified with an extra piece of steel on the top to better lock the tires down.

   After initial testing, the LIRR claimed they had sufficient demand for their use, and pursued funding for additional bogies. In July of 1990, they received a grant from the New York State Department of Transportation that allowed the purchase of the original twelve cars from Berwick, the pair of trailer unloaders, as well as funding for thirty-three additional bogies, costing a grand total of $924,000. However, not all was good with the service as LIRR touted. In 1994, a New York State ordered audit of the LIRR Freight Department, found that there was very little demand for the bogie service, and LIRR did not commence with proper marketing to advertise this service. The kicker was when they received the $924,000 grant in 1990, they in fact had no customers using the bogies at that time.

    The second batch of Bogies were built in August of 1991, and were delivered to Long Island in September. At that time, the only customer using the bogies was Clare Rose beer distributors, who would only use the bogie service until December of 1991, which turned out to be the last time the bogie were ever used. Of the thirty-three new cars that arrived in September, approximately ten to fifteen were ever actually used in service. Thus, most of the bogie fleet was never even used a single time.

   Around the same period of time, New York Cross Harbor RR also requested additional conditions to be met, and as a result the LIRR discontinued using the bogies. One must consider, the extent of the bogie's trip was all of a whopping 35 miles each way. Charging enough to cover the costs of two railroads is hard to compete with the affordability and competitiveness of local trucking. At the time of the 1994 Audit, the LIRR had plans to continue marketing the bogie service to try and drum up business, but this never panned out.

The end of the Bogies...

   The bogies themselves had there own design issues. They were very light cars and had to be treated carefully. The Federal Railroad Administration put a restriction on the cars to operate with more then 15 trailers per train. LIRR even went to the effort of producing a booklet for train crews on how to handle the cars properly. If the thirty-nine months that the Bogies were available for use, only 4 customers ever used the service. The US Postal Service and Clare Rose were the largest users of the cars.

   Following the discontinuation of Bogie service, the cars would be stored in Yard A in Long Island City, and Fresh Pond Yard in Queens. At some point eight of bogies in Long Island City were relocated to behind the old Yard A Hump. The cars in Fresh Pond Yard were moved up onto the Montauk Cutoff. In 2003, when work began on the East Side Access Project, the cars in Yard A were moved to the Montauk Cutoff as well, grouping together a total of thirty-three cars. The remaining twelve bogies are stored in Hicksville on the Long Island Lighting Co. siding. To this day, the cars are still there, covered in graffiti and completely overgrown. The unloader used by New York Cross Harbor RR in Greenville was scrapped in 2004, and the unloader in Pinelawn was scrapped in 2010. In December of 2014 a switch was installed on the Cutoff to facilitate the moving of the bogies for scrap. As of January 2017, the  bogies have yet to be moved.

   The LIRR had high hopes for the cars, with only 17,131 freight cars moved in 1987, and 11,962 in 1991. The goal was to use the bogies to try and win back some of the freight traffic lost to truck competition, but the LIRR never pushed the service enough apparently. Combine this with the end of NY Freight Rail Subsidies ($375,000 in its last year), the LIRR needed something to get more revenue. The plan was that if the bogies succeeded would have been to build terminals for them at Hicksville, Ronkonkoma, Republic, and Holtsville.

   Intermodal Concepts, the group that came up with this idea, is never mentioned in any of the Bogie reports, paperwork or  any other literature. The group patented several various ideas relating to using different types of Bogies, as well as other methods of hauling trailers on the railroad. Unfortunately, there is very little information on this company so far.

Technical Data

   The 12 original cars were 8001, 8002, 1001-1008 and 9001 & 9002.

   The second order of thirty-three cars included 8003-8007, 1009-1031 and 9003-9007

   All the cars used “LIRR” as there painted on reporting mark, however LIRR's actual registered reporting mark is “LI”. It is unknown why this was done. The large fleet of LIRR ore cars used “LIRR” as well. It is assumed it is due to the fact that the cars were never interchanged in general service.

   The bogies stored in Hicksville on the LILCo siding are: 8001, 8007, 1004, 1005, 1006, 1007, 1008, 1009, 1010, 1012, 1026, 9002, and 9007. The remainder of the cars are in Long Island City on the Montauk Cutoff.

   Due to the fact that the Bogies were low profile cars, they all used 28” wheels and all the bogies were 2 axle cars. All of the cars were only 33” tall, from the railhead to the top of the deck, not counting any of the grabs, fifth wheel hitches, etc. The cars were a little over 10' wide (122 inches). 8000 Series cars were 17' 6” long; 1000 Series cars were 23' 6” long; and 9000 Series cars were 21' long; none of these dimension include the couplers.

   The first twelve cars weighed in at: 8000 Series cars were 16,800 lbs.; 1000 Series cars at 18,800 lbs. and 9000 Series were also 16,800 lbs. The second order of cars weighed the following: 8000 Series were 18,850 lbs.; 1000 Series cars were 18,740 lbs. and 9000 Series cars were 17,705 lbs.

   The first cars to come to LI had all of there lettering painted in Black. The first batch of the second order were also delivered with black lettering, however the later ones in the series came with white lettering. LIRR started to repaint some of the early cars to white lettering, however not all were done.


1988 - The Bogies first arrive in 1988 on New York Cross Harbor Railroad Carfloat #17
Benjamin W. Schaefer photo

added 07 February 2017


After being unloaded, the Bogies waited in Bush Terminal as one large set before being moved to 65th Street to interchange with the Long Island RR.
Benjamin W. Schaefer photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The first trip of the Bogies on Long Island. They are on their way to the Garden City Team Yard for loading.
Long Island Rail Road Freight Department photo
collection of Joel Torres
added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


Loading the cars it seems was a bit of a media event as well.
Long Island Rail Road Freight Department photo
collection of Joel Torres

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The first batch of loaded cars after arriving in Fresh Pond, NY. The cars are loaded with incinerator ash.
Long Island Rail Road Freight Department photo
collection of Joel Torres

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The brand new Bogies, as well as the unloader in Pinelawn, NY.
It appears the loader is still being assembled.
Long Island Rail Road Freight Department photo
collection of Joel Torres
added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


Pinelawn, NY
This was when the United States Postal Service was using the  bogies for mail service, going to and from the nearby postal distribution center.
Al Castelli photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The very first end Bogie, 8001, shown here shortly after coming to Long Island.
Al Castelli photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


October 1988 - Garden City, NY
Night loading of the Bogies. Note the blue spreader bar above the trailer.
Long Island Rail Road Freight Department photo
collection of Joel Torres

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


June 1989 - Fresh Pond Yard, Queens, NY
A loaded set of Bogies in Multimodal of New Jersey.
Long Island Rail Road Freight Department photo
collection of Joel Torres

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


March 9, 1989 - Greenville, NJ
Greenville Yard, NJ was the Bogies western terminal. Here, NYCH #21 [Alco S1] is pulling a recently loaded set of Bogies under the unloader.
Carl Perelman photo
Paul F. Strubeck collection

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


November 1991 - A brand new set of bogies, part of the second order wait in Greenville, NJ.
M. DeLuca photo.
Paul F. Strubeck collection

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


December 10, 1991 - Shows New York Cross Harbor Railroad getting ready to load a set of Bogies for their trip east to Brooklyn, New York.
One can see the unloader on the right side of image. This shot is a good illustration of how short these cars were when loaded, as seen next to a generic 50' boxcar.
Carl Perelman photo
Paul F. Strubeck collection
added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


December 10, 1991 - The same five Bogies above are now loaded on the Carfloat for the trip to New York.
One can see the red air hose stretched out under the trailers, to connect the air brake system between all the cars.
Carl Perelman photo
Paul F. Strubeck collection

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


This westbound set of bogies was obviously not a money making trip, as only a pair of trailer loads (in background) is on the bogie set.
(The open topped ash containers in foreground are on an 89' foot flat car. )
M. DeLuca photo
Paul F. Strubeck collection
added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


LIRR 8007, shows the standard height Type H coupler on the left side, as well as the six cast steel counterweight blocks.
Each car had its own AB brake system squeezed into it, with a standard Ajax handbrake on the end with the fifth wheel hitch.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


LIRR 1012, one of the “center” bogies, shows the trailer wheel wells on the left side, as well as the low height Type E coupler.
On the right was the fifth wheel hitch, retractable red air hose reel, and another low height Type E coupler.
In this photo one can see how the wheel well platform can actually pivot slightly.
Paul F. Strubeck photo
added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


LIRR 9007 has the low height Type E coupler on the front, and the wheel wells. The opposite end has the standard height Type H coupler.
The 9000 Series end bogies did not have the cast counterweights like the 8000 Series bogies did.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


This view shows the original, as delivered air hose reel. It was mounted in an enclosed square box, directly behind the 5th wheel hitch.
A handful of the original 12 cars had these removed and replaced with the larger red ones.
Al Castelli photo
added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


1006 has the as delivered wheel wells, the later cars had a small extension added to better grip the wheels.
Al Castelli photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


Here is the end of a 9000 Series bogie, showing the standard height type H coupler.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The end of an 8000 Series bogie. One can see the brake beam, as well as the small spring sets. The cast steel counterweights designate this as an 8000 Series bogie.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


This is one of the original  order 1000 series cars. This particular car has its original square hose reel. Visible are the lower height type E couplers as well.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


Each car has its own individual AB brake system. The rod in the foreground is connected to the handbrake.
Each car also has a slack adjuster built into the system, seen on the top left. The brake systems on each of the 3 different bogies are all slightly different.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


Each end of the brake rods goes to a lever, mounted at a 45 degree angle to operate the actual brake beams.
You can also see the simple construction of how the wheelsets mount to the frame.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


This view shows the wheel wells in which the trailers tires would sit. Directly under the clevis pin in the slack adjuster you can just make out a round pin,
of which the entire assembly pivots on. The wheel stops themselves were modified on the original cars to include the additional piece on the top,
which came on the later half of the 2nd order of cars. Each wheel chock is composed of several pieces, in which a set of springs are mounted.
The springs are designed to keep constant pressure on the tire sets.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The coupler height differences between the Bogies types is clearly illustrated here.
John McCluskey photo
added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The Bogie unloader in Pinelawn. These unloaders had tires on the bottom, and ran on a set of rails so they could move to the next car to load/unload it.
They operated very similar to a typical trailer loader seen at any intermodal yard. In 1991, the loader in Pinelawn was equipped with a set of rubber tires on one side,
so it could operate with only one rail. This apparently did not work, and it was converted back to operating on a pair of rails.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The line of stored cars on the Montauk Cutoff.
Paul F. Strubeck photo

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.fr


8001 rests in Hicksville over 15 years after the Castelli photo was taken.

Joe Gregory photo
added 02 May 2012

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© 2017 - www.fr


One cut of Bogies sits on the siding in Hicksville, NY
Joe Gregory photo

added 02 May 2012

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.fr


The cut of bogies on the Montauk Cut-Off - unknown date - Hunters Point Avenue & 25th Street, Long Island City, Queens, NY

Joe Gregory photo
added 02 May 2012

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© 2017 - www.fr


Close up of one the intermediate cars in Hunters Point Avenue & 25th Street, Long Island City, Queens, NY

Joe Gregory photo
added 02 May 2012

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© 2017 - www.fr


Custom built crane used to lift the trailers off the bogies - Farmingdale, NY
Albert Castelli photo

added 02 May 2012

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

Ephemera


A westbound move log sheet for a set of Bogies heading to Greenville
collection of Paul F. Strubeck

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


A waybill for a single bogie move.
collection of Paul F. Strubeck

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


The log sheet for each trailer/container and where it was loaded on the train.
collection of Paul F. Strubeck

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


NYCHRR switch list documenting an interchange move with the LIRR and the Bogies.
collection of Paul F. Strubeck

added 07 February 2017

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© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info


LIRR "Along the Track" newsletter featuring the new Bogie service.
collection of Paul F. Strubeck

added 07 February 2017

© 2017 - www.freightrrofnyc.info

Unfortunately, there has been extremely little information written on these bogies over the years, short of a handful of “paragraphs” in magazine articles here and there. Much of the work written here is from my own first hand knowledge spent studying the cars and there designs. There are a few tidbits of further reading:

Special thanks to Joel Torres, who provided the Long Island Rail Road Freight Department images, as well as insight to the operation.


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RETURN TO INDEX

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Special Moves

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Outbound Subway & Commuter Cars for Scrap

   Throughout the 1980's, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad received a contract for the handling of scrap subway cars for the New York City Transit Authority.

   These cars were loaded directly onto carfloats and shipped to Greenville, NJ. Some were scrapped right in the yard in Greenville by Abato Bus Sales, while others were sent to Naparano Iron & Metal in Newark, NJ.

   Also, a handful of the retired Long Island Rail Road Budd M1 "Metropolitan" cars were loaded on top of 89' flatcars by the Long Island Rail Road. These cars were then sent to Bush Terminal and subsequently carfloated to Greenville, NJ. Actually, only very few M1's went this way; with the majority of the shipment going via Canadian Pacific Rail on the New York Connecting Railroad.

   Also being sent out for scrapping, were Long Island Rail Road P72 / 75 Class cars. These were put on a carfloat where they were taken to Newark, NJ to be scrapped. Known cars included #2902, #2832, #2785, #2895, #2797 & #2871.

Inbound Subway & Commuter Cars

   During the 1980's; the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (the parent organization for the New York City Transit Authority, Staten Island Rapid Transit, Metro-North and Long Island Rail Road); commenced with a major system-wide fleet modernization program.

   As the scrap cars were sent out (as mentioned in the above chapter), new and rebuilt cars would arrive to replace the obsolete cars. Most of the new subway cars constructed by Bombardier and Kawasaki; as were the rebuilds from Morrison-Knudson; came into Brooklyn from Greenville, NJ via carfloat. These subway cars were loaded on top of flatcars "piggy back style", with trucks installed and "ready to roll". These cars were unloaded either in Bush Terminal the South Brooklyn Railway's yard at 38th Street & Third Avenue, or in a very rare instance, new subway cars were unloaded directly from a freighter onto a carfloat.

   To unload the last order of R46 subway carso that arrived loaded upon flatcars, an earthen unloading ramp was built in 1992 at the northern end of the Bush Terminal Yard, just east of the enginehouse. This ramp was also used to unload newly arrived refuse collection trucks for the Department of Sanitation of the City of New York which arrived "TOFC style" upon flat cars


Subway Car Unloading Ramp (ground view) at Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - January 2010
P. M. Goldstein phot
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Subway Car Unloading Ramp (elevated view) at Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - January 2010
P. M. Goldstein photo

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   A similar ramp made of railroad ties in located at the nearby South Brooklyn Railway Yard at 38th Street and Third Avenue (see South Brooklyn Railway for images).

   Also during this time, Metro-North sent some of their Budd M4 electric commuter cars to NemCo, located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, thus giving the Brooklyn Navy Yard one last fleeting moment of carfloating glory.

   Ironically, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad also carfloated the rebuilt Port Authority Trans Hudson (PATH) PA 1 cars to and from the Brooklyn Army Terminal Yard at 65th Street, where the PA1's were rebuilt by New York Railcar Company.

   It is amusing that not one but both of Brooklyn's former military properties would be home to railcar rebuilders and New York Cross Harbor Railroad would have the honors to provide carfloat service to both.

   In 1999, when the Long Island Rail Road was modernizing their passenger car fleet; the brand new Bilevel cars were delivered via the New York Cross Harbor Railroad. These cars were carfloated into Bush Terminal and then delivered to New York & Atlantic Railway at 65th Street.

   Timing was important, and a "headlight to headlight meet" was needed to prevent any sort of vandalism to the brand new, million dollar commuter cars.

Valley Railroad #1647

   In January of 1990, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad had the honor of transporting the (then) brand new Valley Railroad 2-8-2 #1647.

   This steam locomotive was built brand new by Tan Shan Locomotive Company located in the Peoples Republic of China. #1647 was then shipped over by freighter and offloaded in New Jersey. Then, it was carfloated over to Bush Terminal and transported to the Brooklyn Army Terminal by New York Cross Harbor Railroad for interchange with Long Island Railroad.


Valley Railroad (2-8-2) #1647 and NYCH #22 - Greenville, NJ - January 10, 1990
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 30 April 2012

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LIRR MP15's 153 & 157 and Valley Railroad #1647 - Brooklyn Army Terminal - January 1990
Taken from front walk of NYCH #21 (see photo below)
Valley Railroad #1647 being picked up by Long Island Railroad crews.
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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NYCH #21 at Brooklyn Army Terminal - January 1990
(Valley Railroad #1647 being picked up by Long Island Railroad crews. Red van belongs to Mike Balkan.)
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection
added 01 May 2012

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NYCH engineer Charlie McClelland at the control stand of #21 - January 1990
Valley Railroad #1647 being picked up by Long Island Railroad crews.
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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LIRR MP15's 153 & 157 and Valley Railroad #1647 - Brooklyn Army Terminal - January 1990
Valley Railroad #1647 being picked up by Long Island Railroad crews.
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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Mark Balkan (Mark I Video Productions) & Harry Lynch (conductor, New York Cross Harbor RR- January 1990
Brooklyn Army Terminal
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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Mark Balkan (Mark I Video Productions) & Harry Lynch (conductor, New York Cross Harbor RR- January 1990
Brooklyn Army Terminal
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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Brooklyn Army Terminal / Long Island Railroad Interchange Track - January 1990
On her way to Connecticut - via Bay Ridge Branch, Fresh Pond, Hell Gate Bridge and points north.
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

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#1647 is still around today, operating as New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad #142.

Inbound Plasser Track Geometry Car

   Also taking place in 1999, a new Plasser-American Track Geometry Car was purchased by the Long Island Railroad. This Geometry Car was carfloated into Bush Terminal, and as before hauled to 65th Street for interchange with the New York & Atlantic Railway.

Outbound GP38-2's and Inbound DE / DM30AC

   Undertaking another fleet modernization, the Long Island Rail Road also shipped their fleet of aging GP38-2 locomotives back to ElectroMotive Division (EMD).

   These locomotives were shipped with the assistance of the New York Cross Harbor in late 1999. The locomotives were stored in Bush Terminal, then carfloated over to Greenville, several at a time.

   Some of the new replacement engines, the DE and DM30AC locomotives were transported inbound to Long Island Rail Road via the New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

Heavy Vehicles

   In the late 1980's, New York Cross Harbor Railroad moved a load of trucks to the Atlantic Basin for ship side direct lightering.

   These trucks, which had been received already loaded upon flatcars; had in turn been loaded onto a carfloat by New York Cross Harbor Railroad. The carfloat was then tied up next to the ship, and ship board cranes hoisted the trucks aboard. The trucks were destined for Istanbul, Turkey.

RETURN TO INDEX


Miscellaneous Data & Information

.

Eared Knuckles

   "Eared" knuckles are a special type of coupler knuckle that were utilized on locomotives working carfloats for Marine-Rail outfits:

   These knuckles had extensions cast into the top and bottom of the knuckle, which allowed for extra vertical movement of the adjoining coupler on the car being towed (which were without eared knuckles).


"Eared knuckle" on coupler for carfloat / float bridge work.
P. F. Strubeck photo

.

   This was crucial when moving cars over the rather sharp and abrupt angle changes in either approaching the apron from land or from the apron to the carfloat.

   Only a few New York Cross Harbor Railroad locomotives were equipped with these types of eared knuckles, and if they were so equipped, it was early on in the 1980's.

   For an unknown reason, the eared knuckles were removed.

   It is also believed that when a new locomotive was acquired, the eared knuckle off the locomotive that it was replacing was transferred to the newly arrived locomotive,; but this has not been positively confirmed.

   The photo above, is of the eared knuckle on BEDT 16. All of BEDT's locomotives (steam & diesel) were equipped with eared knuckles, front and rear.

Rerail Frogs

   On the original New York Cross Harbor Railroad fleet, a special sheet metal side was added to the last handrail sanction on the engineers side extending to the cab. This small box like enclosure was on there to hold rerail frogs and heavy ropes.

Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #16

   In late 1992, BEDT 16, a H. K. Porter 0-6-0T; was moved from is long abandoned state in front of the old Kent Avenue enginehouse to the Bush Terminal enginehouse. At this time, a few different groups tried to claim ownership. Later on, shop forces of New York Cross Harbor Railroad painted 16 to a makeshift BEDT scheme and even replaced the number plate.

   While this restoration was not 100% correct or prototypical, this makeshift restoration made it presentable. It has since been said, that the this makeshift restoration was done to commemorate the retirement of Harry Lynch; a locomotive engineer for Bush Terminal Railroad, New York Dock and subsequently the New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

   In 1999, the Railroad Museum of Long Island acquired 16 and it was moved to their Riverhead Restoration Site.

RETURN TO INDEX


New York Cross Harbor Railroad Police

.

   Beginning in the early 1990's, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad organized and employed its own police force.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad Police Department employed a full time Police Chief, in addition to about a dozen "Reserve Special Agents" , who in turn were commanded by the "Reserve Superintendent of the Railroad Police".

   In reality, the principal duty of the New York Cross Harbor Railroad Police Department was traffic control on freight movements that transversed First Avenue among the other city thoroughfares.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad Police Reserve held training drills on the property, as well as assisting with security during events and affairs concerning Robert Diamond and Brooklyn Historic Railway Association.

   Most of the Reserve Agents had been previously employed in some facet of law enforcement. The uniform was a light blue shirt, with blue jeans and work boots. Gold colored badges were also issued for use. A pair of patches were used: one design was for property protection, and the other design for train protection. Both were worn, with one on each sleeve of the shirt.


Property Protection



New York Cross Harbor Railroad
"Train Protection Unit" patch.
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

RETURN TO INDEX


Locomotive Overview

.


Greenville, NJ - April 3, 1986
A. Tillotson photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 02 June 2010

   When the New York Cross Harbor Railroad was organized, it acquired all the locomotives from the 1978 New York Dock / Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal merger. Some of these locomotives would go on to be used, others would become parts donors, and some surplus for sale.

   From the beginning of operations in August 1983, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad used several of the ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal American Locomotive Company Model S-1 locomotives. Locomotives used were 22, 25; with 21 originally being stored with the remainder of the surplus locomotives but would be reactivated by New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

   Also, New York Cross Harbor Railroad operated the pair of ex-New York Dock ElectroMotive Division Model NW-2's: which were numbered #58 and 59. Number 59 would have the honor of being the first locomotive to be painted in the new New York Cross Harbor Railroad livery scheme.

   New York Cross Harbor Railroad chose not to utilize three of the former Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal S1's (#23, 24 & 26) which served as parts donors for #21, 22 and 25, nor did they operate either of the pair of the former New York Dock's American Locomotive Company Model RS-3's or any of the four General Electric  Model 44 Tonners (#51, 52, 54 or 55).

   The unused and surplus locomotives  (the two RS3's, four 44 tonners and three S1's were first stored in the Brooklyn Army Terminal for eventual parts use (as the BEDT S1's would be) or stored in the hopes another railroad would purchase them outright for use. This only occurred with one locomotive: New York Dock #55. This locomotive was sold to Eastern Railcar in New Jersey, which has since be resold to East Penn Railroad.

   Soon after the locomotives being placed in the Brooklyn Army Terminal however, the remaining locomotives would be stored on a carfloat, and moved to the former New York Dock Fulton Terminal. It would be moored to the pier until January 1986, at which time the carfloat that the locomotives were stored on, was relocated to Newark, NJ; and all units were scrapped at this location.

   The first locomotive to actually have been purchased by New York Cross Harbor Railroad was #11, an American Locomotive Company model S4. This locomotive was purchased from the Massena Terminal Railroad in upstate NY, where it was also their #11. Massena Terminal purchased this locomotive new. Unfortunately in 2000, #11 blew it's turbocharger and sat idle until June 2006 which at such time it was scrapped in the Greenville Yard.

   The Alco model S4 is almost identical in appearance to the model S1, with the only differences between the models being that the engine on the S4 was equipped with a turbocharger, which resulted in a trapezoidal base exhaust stack. The S1 model is not turbocharged and has a conical base exhaust stack. The other significant difference is that the S4 model rides on AAR Type A switcher trucks and the S1 model rides on Alco "Blunt" trucks, which have a "thinner" and "lighter duty" appearance.

   In October of 1997, New York Cross Harbor leased SW1500 #9607 from Conrail for an as yet unknown span of time.

   In 2000, New York Cross Harbor Railroad purchased a General Electric model U23B. This locomotive did not see service often, and would be sold in 2006.

   Also in 2000, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad purchased three ex-Green Bay & Western American Locomotive Company model C424 (Century 424) locomotives. The New York Cross Harbor Railroad planned to make "mother-slug" sets out of these locomotives with the retired ex-BEDT Alco S1's. But this never happened and the plans came to naught.

   In 2004, New York Cross Harbor Railroad purchased two ex-Union Pacific Yard (UPY) Electro Motive Division model SW-1500 Switchers. One of these locomotives remains in service today. The other unit was sold / traded to Juniata Terminal and is no longer on the property.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad has leased other locomotives over the years. These mostly BDLX units, of which denotes Big Dog Leasing. One of these locomotives, #2293 was overhauled in 2006. During this period, New York Cross Harbor Railroad borrowed / leased a locomotive from the Morristown & Erie Railroad, #563.

RETURN TO INDEX


Locomotive Livery & Paint Schemes

.

   Over the years, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad has employed the use of a few interesting paint schemes and heralds that were used on the locomotives.

First Generation, 'A' Variant: 1983 - 1989

.

   Originally when New York Cross Harbor Railroad was organized, in those first few weeks of operation, they used "patched", i.e. the letters BEDT on the engine doors and cab sides painted over, and with NY Cross Harbor Railroad lettering now on the side of the cabs. The handrails remained yellow.

   Locomotives 22 and 25 wore this patched BEDT livery for the first few months of operation in 1983. Shortly thereafter, the locomotives were painted blue with a white hood stripe, white handrails, white safety stripes on the front & rear pilots, white cab roof, but with the same text on the cab sides.

  When locomotive #21 was re-activated in 1985, it too wore this patched BEDT livery for a few weeks of operation until being repainted, of which by this time the B Variant was in use.

.

First Generation, 'B' Variant: 1984 - 1989


original design by B. Schaeffer
website artwork by J. Otto

.

   In 1983, Locomotives #58 and 59 were also painted into the blue scheme as mentioned above, however they did not receive the cab lettering. #58 and 59 operated with no lettering on the cab sides until late 1984. At this time, the herald designed by Benjamin Schaeffer (a very prominent and well regarded railroad historian and railfan of the Metro New York Area) was adopted for use on the New York Cross Harbor Railroad locomotives.

   As mentioned above, #21 received this logo.

.

Second Generation: 1989 - 1998

   In 1989, a more refined variation of Ben Schaeffer's herald was created. The new design now had an "air brushed" style to the images of the tugboat and locomotive (as opposed to the outline drawing appearance of the first generation herald).

    However, while the diagonal "CROSS HARBOR" in the first generation herald is solid, the diagonal lettering of "CROSS HARBOR" in the second generation appears to be a stencil.

   At this time, the color scheme of the overall locomotive was also changed. Locomotives were now painted with the majority of the carbody in medium blue, with a white hood stripe and the top of the carbody in teal blue. However, #59 was an exception in that it did not have the white stripe and the medium blue and teal blue were next to each other with no dividing line.

   Locomotives #11, 21, 22 and 25 received this livery circa 1989, with #59 following in 1991. #58 did not receive this livery as it was already out of service.

.

Third Generation: 1998 - 2006

 .

    In 1998, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad completely changed the livery of it's locomotives. The locomotives would now be painted in all black with yellow highlights. A new herald: "Cross Harbor" with opposing arrows above and below the letters, held its debut.

   Locomotive #1337 & #11, would receive the new black & yellow paint scheme, however #11 would receive only the new "opposing arrow"  herald.

   All other operable locomotives obtained and utilized after this livery was released, remained in their original or as delivered liveries, until New York New Jersey Rail ownership.

RETURN TO INDEX


Locomotive Photo Index

..

21

22

25

58

59

11

9607

1337

2293

2395

1068

1133

563

21


In front of the enginehouse at Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - unknown date
Phase 2 livery.
S. Milstein photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - circa 1986?
Note the different safety stripes on the front pilot. It appears one side was replaced due to damage.
S. Milstein photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Greenville, NJ -
 October 4, 1989
Note: A rare photo of the crew & locomotive working 12 Bridge!
Also note that the "Brooklyn III" can partially be seen to the right of the BEDT Bicentennial Boxcar,
and speaking of which, the crew is using two idler cars: the Conrail gondola and the boxcar.
Carl G. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Bush Terminal - January 1990
Bewteen 42nd and and 43rd Street. Interdynamics siding and 42nd Street behind locomotive.
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

.

.


Brooklyn Army Terminal - January 1990
Looking north.
M. DeLuca photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 01 May 2012

.

.


Atlantic Terminal Float Bridge - February 28, 1990
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - May 30, 1992
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 14 October 2012

.

.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - unknown date
Note the plated over windows
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.

22


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - August 28,1983
Note "patched" BEDT livery: the grab irons and hand rails are yellow, the cab has NY Cross Harbor.
The New York Cross Harbor Railroad is but two weeks old when this photo was taken.
Note the switch lining bar in the front grab iron / hood ladder.
Carl G. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - November 20, 1984
Hand rails and grab irons now white.
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.

   
50th Street "Bush 1" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - November 30, 1984
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Greenville, NJ - April 3, 1986
Allan Tillotson photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Greenville, NJ - August 26, 1987
Allan Tillotson photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Greenville, NJ - August 23, 1989
Phase 3 livery. Can you smell the fresh paint? Also, note the BEDT Boxcar.
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Greenville, NJ - January 10, 1990 - with Valley Railroad #1647
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 30 April 2012

.

.


Bush Junction / South Brooklyn Railway Interchange, Second Avenue & 39th Street - 1992
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

.


Bush Terminal Yard - First Avenue, Brooklyn, NY - July 5, 1993
With South Brooklyn Railway General Electric 47 Tonner N2
C. G. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck archives

.

.

25


Bush Junction / South Brooklyn Railway Interchange. Second Avenue and 39th Street, Brooklyn NY - unknown date
Very likely the first week of operation (August 1983) as "NY Cross Harbor Railroad" has not yet been painted on the cab.
Pulling new R62 subway cars into South Brooklyn Railway Yard.
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Atlantic Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - August 28,1983
Phase 1 livery.
Richard O. Adams photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - August 25, 1985
The red bicentennial sash has been painted over and white cab roof added.
Also note the NYD Reach Car (#101) in front of locomotive.
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Greenville, NJ - November 17, 1997
Coupled to the X31 boxcar MoW #3 with matching livery (albeit with a touch of graffiti)!
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - ca. 1990
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 03 May 2012

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - February 1998
J. Maggio photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 03 May 2012

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - March 16, 1998
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 03 May 2012

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58


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - February 1984
J. Maggio photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 03 May 2012

.

.


Greenville, NJ - December 1984
Fred Breimann in cab.
T. Trechansky photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 03 May 2012

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - December 26, 1984
Note subway car on right edge of photo.
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck Collection

.


October 1987
B. McBride photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 28 April 2012

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.


50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - unknown date
S. Goldstein photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

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50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge lead with Idler #101; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - unknown date
S. Goldstein photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - unknown date
P. F. Strubeck collection

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58 (left) & 21 (right), Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - March 12, 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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59


Brooklyn Army Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - March 15, 1984
Note no logo on cab sides!
Also note the New York Central steam powered supply boat in the background, above gondola,
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck Collection

.

.


50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 21, 1984
George E. Votava photo
Dave Keller archives

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50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge approach; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 21, 1984
George E. Votava photo
Dave Keller archives

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - February 6, 1986
Phase 2 livery.
Note locomotive is derailed!
R. H. Lehmuth photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Crossing First Avenue - February 1988
Pulling a hopper out of Franklin Polymers at First Avenue & 47th Street
Bill Myerr photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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Brooklyn Army Terminal, First Avenue - May 30, 1992
Shoving towards the 65th Street Yard.
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


Brooklyn Army Terminal - May 30, 1992
Note the caboose!
T. Trencansky photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 14 October 2012

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.


50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - 1994
The red containers on flatcars are the containers that are used to haul semi- solidified sewerage sludge.
John McCluskey photo

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Greenville, NJ - May 7, 1994
The red containers on flatcars are the containers that are used to haul semi- solidified sewerage sludge.
Carl Perelman photo
P. Strubeck Collection

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Greenville, NJ - May 7, 1994
Note locomotive is on a carfloat!
Alan Tillotson photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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Jersey City, NJ - September 2007
At Clean Earth Soil Remediation / Recycling.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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11


In front of the enginehouse at Bush Terminal - January 1990
Freshly painted.
Note the compromise coupler for subway car moves.
unknown photographer
P. Strubeck collection

.


March 1991
B. McBride photo
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 28 April 2012

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.


Greenville, NJ - May 1991
Carl G. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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Greenville, NJ - May 30, 1992
unknown photographer
P. F. Strubeck collection

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Greenville, NJ - April 14, 1994
With NYCH reacher gondola 58172
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 30 April 2012

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.


Greenville, NJ - May 12, 2006.
Note #2395 behind.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Greenville, NJ - May 12, 2006.
P. F. Strubeck photo

.

9607


Greenville, NJ - October 30, 1997
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 02 May 2012

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.

1337


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - 1998
Pulling a carfloat.
John McCluskey photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - 1998
Pulling a carfloat.
John McCluskey photo

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Greenville, NJ - October 15, 1998
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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2293


Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - May 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal Yard, Brooklyn, NY - May 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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2395


Greenville, NJ - 2006
Prior to being sold.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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1068


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - March 12, 2006
P. F. Strubeck photo

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1133


Greenville, NJ - March 12, 2006
Waiting on an incoming carfloat.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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.


Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - September 2007
In front of the enginehouse.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY -September 2007
P. F. Strubeck Photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Spotting an empty  bulkhead flat from Davidson Pipe.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Pulling an empty boxcar out of Yi Pin / Plywood Specialties siding at First Avenue & 40th Street - 2007
P. F. Strubeck photo

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First Avenue and 42 Street, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Heading to Plywood Specialties.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Making up a train.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Heading down to the float bridge.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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.


50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
Ready to refuel at the diesel pump.
P. F. Strubeck photo

RETURN TO INDEX

.

.

Please note:
All locomotives listed in the rosters below are standard gauge (56.5" / 4' 8 ½ ") and are of B-B (four powered axles) wheel arrangement.

New York Cross Harbor Locomotive Roster

number /
name

builder
model
c/n
build
date
hp

previous
owners


acquired

disposition

notes
21 ALCo S1 74351 8/1947 660 Union RR #453;
Duffy (RR Equipment dealer);
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)

BEDT #21
used 8/1983 (stored)
ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
retired 1991
scrapped 7/2006
originally stored 8/1983;
activated 3/1985;
stored for possible slug use
22 ALCo S1 75525 10/1947 660 New Orleans & Lower Coast #9013
Missouri Pacific #6604
Duffy (RR Equipment dealer)
Silcott (RR Equipment dealer)
BEDT #22
used 8/1983
ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
retired 1993
scrapped 7/2006
stored for
possible slug use
25 ALCo S1 74962 10/1946 660 Erie #307
Erie Lackawanna #307
BEDT #25
used 8/1983
ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
Saved for preservation & painted to 
New York Central #8625 livery.
Currently on display at
Riverside Park, NY
 
58 EMD NW2 3645 9/1946 1000 Southern  #2234
Southern #1026
used 8/1983
ex-New York Dock
retired 1987
scrapped 7/2006
stored for possible slug use
59 EMD NW2 4753 11/1946 1000 Southern #2253
Southern #1044
used 8/1983
ex-New York Dock
sold 2001 to
Clean Earth Remediation,
Jersey City, NJ

stored (out of service?)
 
11 ALCo S4 79219 12/1951 1000 Massena Terminal #11 used 1989 scrapped 6/2006 blown turbo1 ca. 2001
for sale 5/2006
9607 EMD SW1500 36155 12/1969 1500 EMDX demonstrator #111
Indianapolis Union #29
Conrail #9607
leased 1997 to CSXT #1096
to LLPX #208
leased by NYCH
for unknown period of time.
1337 EMD SW1200RS A1574 12/1958 1200 Canadian National #1337
Ohio Central #1337

Big Dog Leasing #1337
leased 1997 returned to lessor 2000  
2293 EMD SW1200 31574 4/1966 1200 St. Louis Southwestern #2293
Ohio Central #2293
Big Dog Leasing #2293
used 2000
from Big Dog Leasing;
rebuilt summer 2006
by Juniata Terminal;

transferred to NYNJ Rail 2006
 
2395 GE U23B 40126 1/1975 2250 Louisville & Nashville #2816
CSXT #3317
Reading, Blue Mt. & Northern #2395
used 2001 sold 5/2006
Fore River Railroad
#2372
1068 EMD SW1500 33152 10/1967 1500 Southern Pacific #2461
Union Pacific Yard #1068
used 2004
National Railway Equipment;

traded 5/06 to Juniata Terminal
for?
 
1133 EMD SW1500 35242 11/1967 1500 Southern Pacific #2549
Union Pacific Yard #1133
used 2004
National Railway Equipment
transferred to NYNJ Rail 2006  

.

Locomotives acquired but not used by New York Cross Harbor

23 ALCo S1 75526 10/1947 660 New Orleans & Lower Coast #9014
Missouri Pacific #6605
Duffy (dealer)
Silcott (dealer)
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #23
used 1983 scrapped 1/86 used for parts
24 ALCo S1 75527 10/1947 660 New Orleans & Lower Coast #9015
Missouri Pacific #6606
Duffy (dealer)
Silcott (dealer)
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #24
used 1983 scrapped 1/86 used for parts
26 ALCo S1 75354 8/1947 660 Erie #313
Erie Lackawanna #313
Neosho Construction #460
American Electric Power
#313
Silcott (dealer)

Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal #26
used 1983 scrapped 1/86 used for parts
51 GE 44 Ton 30851 3/1951 380 New York Dock #51 used 1983 scrapped 1/86 ballasted to 50T
52 GE 44 Ton 30852 3/1951 380 New York Dock #52 used 1983 scrapped 1/86 ballasted to 50T
54 GE 44 Ton 31224 12/1951 380 New York Dock #54 used 1983 scrapped 1/86 ballasted to 50T
55 GE 44 Ton 31225 12/1951 380 New York Dock #55 used 1983 sold 1985 to Eastern Railcar ballasted to 50T
56 ALCo RS3 78756 5/1951 1600 Central of Georgia #114
New York Dock #56
used 1983 scrapped 1/86
57 ALCo RS3 78755 5/1951 1600 Central of Georgia #113
New York Dock #57
used 1983 scrapped 1/86
319 ALCo C424 84547 5/1963 2400 Pennsylvania #2415
Penn Central #2415
Conrail #2474
Green Bay & Western #319
Caddo, Antoine and Little Missouri #319
used 2000 sold to
Livonia, Avon &
Lakeville RR
to be used as slug mother
never received or used
320 ALCo C424 84554 6/1963 2400 Erie Lackawanna #2412
Conrail #2486
Green Bay & Western #320

Caddo, Antoine and Little Missouri #320
used 2000 sold to
Livonia, Avon &
Lakeville RR
to be used as slug mother
never received or used
321 ALCo C424 84557 6/1963 2400 Erie Lackawanna #2415
Conrail #2489
Green Bay & Western #320

Caddo, Antoine and Little Missouri #321
used 2000 sold to
Livonia, Avon &
Lakeville RR
to be used as slug mother
never received or used

Roster research by P. F. Strubeck, D. Keller, T. Darnell & P. M. Goldstein

Footnotes:

1 According to Mike DeLuca, New York Cross Harbor attempted to reuse fuel oil from one of the tugboats in this locomotive, however the fuel had been contaminated with seawater,
and caused engine failure.

   Paul Strubeck's resources including an advertisement in "RailSwap Classifieds" for this locomotive being sold by New York Cross Harbor and as having a blown turbocharger. The classified ad only ran a couple of weeks before engine was scrapped.

.

RETURN TO INDEX


Marine Equipment

.

Tugboats

   In the early years of operation, New York Cross Harbor Railroad used a pair of ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal tugboats: the "Brooklyn III" and the "New Jersey", to transport carfloats around New York Harbor.


The "Brooklyn III" & "Cross Harbor I" northbound on the East River.
Daniel Hormann photo

.

.


The "Brooklyn III" & "Cross Harbor I" continue heading north on the East River.
Daniel Hormann photo

.

.


"Brooklyn III" and "Cross Harbor I" - unknown date
Brooklyn Army Terminal near the end of their days in Brooklyn.
John McCluskey photo

.

.


"Cross Harbor I" - Melville, RI - July 2011
Rhode Island Island Yacht Club
P. F. Strubeck photo

added 02 May 2012

.

.


Greenville, NJ - February 1993
The "James M. Witte" (former "Liberty" of the Central Railroad of New Jersey) in use by Hepburn Towing.
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

.

.


Greenville, NJ - February 1993
The "James M. Witte" inbound with a carfloat of waste containers.
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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.


July 1, 1994
Eklof "Algonquin"
Carl Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

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50th Street "Bush 2" Float Bridge; Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, NY - June 11, 2007
The "John P. Brown" of Brown Towing prepares to moor a loaded float to Bush 2.
P. F. Strubeck photo

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New York Cross Harbor Railroad Marine Vessel Roster

vessel
name

builder
build
date

hull
number
hp

previous
owners


acquired

disposition

notes
Brooklyn III Jakobson Shipyard
Oyster Bay, NY
1953 344 1590 ex-NYNH&H "Cordelia"
ex-NYNH&H "Transfer 23"
ex-BEDT "Petro-Arrow"
ex-BEDT "Williamsburgh"
used 1983
from BEDT
canopy removed ca. 1991
released back to NYCH
scrapped 1996
wore BEDT livery
entire career
Cross Harbor I Jakobson Shipyard
Oyster Bay, NY
1953 345 1590 ex-NYNH&H "Bumblebee"
ex-NYNH&H "Transfer 24"
ex-BEDT "Petro-Flame"
ex-BEDT "Greenpoint"
ex-BEDT "New Jersey"
used 1983
from BEDT
painting NYCH blue 1986;
sold 1998 to Eastern Towing;
for sale as of 2005;
sold 2007 to Rhode Island Yacht Club
to be used as a breakwater
sunk 11/2007 in storm,
future uncertain.
originally the NYCH
"New Jersey"
until 1985.

Tugboat Footnotes:

   Apparently these two tugboats were owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and leased to New York Cross Harbor Railroad. More research is required in this area and is ongoing. Anyone with information is invited to contact me at: bedt14@aol.com

Carfloats:

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad utilized four carfloats in its operation. As constructed, carfloats can range from 200 to 350 feet long and each carfloat can hold between 10 to 15 cars, depending on the car lengths and loads.

  An interesting side note is that New York Cross Harbor Railroad Carfloat #29 was involved in a lawsuit between New York Cross Harbor Railroad and their insurance underwriter in 1987, when #29 sank with its compliment of 15 loaded cars in the Brooklyn Army Terminal.

   This carfloat has since been refloated and is still in service today.


Greenville, NJ - November 30, 1990
A New York Cross Harbor Railroad carfloat (presumed to be either #16 or #17)
with rebuilt subway cars and New York Cross Harbor Railroad flatcars.
Carl G. Perelman photo

New York Cross Harbor Railroad Carfloat Roster

number configuration official and/or construction # shipyard hull laid launched info notes ref.
#16 three track interchange Bethlehem Steel 1957 steel hull
290'
L x 41' W
ex-New York Dock
purchased from New York Dock Properties 8/1983
rehabilitated in 1998 with new rail.
refurbished in 2009.
Transferred to NYNJ Rail.
.

#17 three track interchange Bethlehem Steel 1957 steel hull
290'
L x 41' W
ex-New York Dock
purchased from New York Dock Properties 8/1983

rehabilitated in 1998 with new rail.
refurbished in 2009.  Disposition unknown.
[1]
.

#29 three track interchange steel hull
360'
L x 41' W
ex-New York, New Haven & Hartford
purchased from New York Dock Properties 8/1983
sunk 1987, refloated
completely overhauled in 1999
.
Transferred to NYNJ Rail.
.

#30 three track interchange steel hull
360'
L x 41' W
ex-New York, New Haven & Hartford
purchased from New York Dock Properties 8/1983
sunk January 8, 2006 at Pier 7 Brooklyn.
[2]
.

#25 station / platform ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
leased 8/1983 from New York Dock Properties,
returned
.

#28 ? ex-Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
leased 8/1983 from New York Dock Properties,
returned


72 ex- New York, New Haven & Hartford?
leased 8/1983 from New York Dock Properties,
returned


207 ex-Baltimore & Ohio
leased 8/1983 from New York Dock Properties,
returned

Carfloat Footnotes:

[1]

Carfloat #17 had its original "box style" track bumpers removed, and a "railroad tie" style bumper installed in place across each track. Removing the box style bumper yielded a few extra feet of track and this modification allowed accomodation of one extra MSW (municipal solid waste) car to feet on each track, thereby increasing the car capacity of the carfloat. (BJS)

[2]

Carfloat #30 after sinking on 1/2006, was salvaged by DonJon Marine Salvage Co. for a cost of $397,000. The carfloat was successfully raised on May 3 2006, and sold for scrap value to DonJon for $60,000.

.

.

RETURN TO INDEX


Non-Revenue Equipment

.

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad also came to own several of other pieces of various non-revenue equipment, as listed below:

MOW #3 Boxcar

   This was an ex-Pennsylvania Railroad X-31 round roof boxcar and this car was used for general storage, Maintenance of Way service and as fuel storage by the New York Cross Harbor Railroad. Inside, a workbench, a hanging winch, 55 gallon drums and a large diesel generator were installed.

   This car was landlocked on the #12 bridge lead in Greenville, NJ. A number 3 was painted on it in the New York Cross Harbor blue and teal, although it became heavily covered in graffiti.    

   This boxcar was scrapped in 2006 (believed to be July 2006).


April 19, 1990
A.Tillotson photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 02 May 2012

.

.


Greenville, NJ - March 2006
P. F. Strubeck photos

.

.

BEDT Bicentennial Boxcar

   Inherited from the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. The origins of this car are not known. It had been painted red, white and blue by Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal shops in 1976 for the Bicentennial Celebration of the United States and for Operation Sail..

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad had this car in ownership from August 1983 until at least 1997. During this time, it was used for storage in Greenville, NJ. This car also had holding tanks for diesel fuel for the locomotives which were gravity fed.

   The disposition of this car is unknown and is presumed scrapped:


Greenville, NJ - 1997
John McCluskey photo

.

.

N5 Class Caboose - Yard Office

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad and now New York New Jersey Rail has a caboose, which was used as a Yard Office at Bush Terminal but is now vacant. It was originally a Pennsylvania Railroad N5 class caboose.

   Careful examination by both this author and fellow historian Philip M. Goldstein in July 2007 and again in February 2009 has revealed that this caboose has a layer of red paint and then green paint under the current blue paint. Therefore, this caboose is in all likelihood the caboose formerly used as the master mechanics office of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, and of which was located behind the enginehouse and shops of that railroad at North 8th Street and the East River Bulkhead.

   Information received from Benjamin W. Schaeffer, clarifies the history:

   This was the third of three cabooses purchased by New York Dock circa 1968. This caboose which went to BEDT is understood to have suffered a minor fire. During tenure at New York Dock, it is unknown if used. If one takes notice, the caboose is first seen at BEDT in the same dark "New York Dock green" with black roof and yellow rungs as C58 above. Due to this, and according to anecdotal information supplied to Benjamin W. Schaeffer, this caboose is almost certainly to have been from the NYD group of three cabooses. In 1980, (following the BEDT / NYD merger in 1978), the caboose was sent to Bush Term enginehouse and repainted green with large triangle NYD logo. It was then moved to the First Avenue entrance gate at the Brooklyn Army Terminal and used as an office for the Trailer on Flatcar (TOFC) operation. Upon cessation of this service, caboose was then moved to back (south end) of Brooklyn Army Terminal property at the south end of the buildings. Circa 1986 New York Cross painted out NYD logo in green, moved caboose to south side of 65th Street Yard. Subsequently moved again to Bush Terminal enginehouse, repainted blue and Cross Harbor herald (type two) on one side only (facing First Avenue) and moved to Greenville to be used as office for TOFC bogie operation. Moved back to Bush Terminal following cessation of bogie operation and unused. The FBI used the caboose for an undercover sting operation circa 1992. In 1993, the caboose was used on a railfan day photo shoot at end of train. In 1994, made into office for Safety Kleen Corp. Porch and bar-b-que pit believed to have been added at this time. Used until ca. 1996 and then vacated. Currently stored at Bush Terminal on and property of New York New Jersey Rail.


(east side - facing First Avenue)
.


(west side - facing warehouses)

New York Cross Harbor Railroad Caboose / Office, Bush Terminal Yard - September 2006
P. F. Strubeck photos

.

.


New York Cross Harbor Railroad Caboose / Office - June 28, 2008
P. M. Goldstein photo

.

.

New York Dock Caboose:

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad also acquired this caboose as well in 1983. It was painted blue and was heavily covered in graffiti in 1995. It was painted in red primer and sat on the First Avenue track for awhile.

   This caboose might have been the Bush Terminal Railroad's Yard Office which was located at 50th Street and First Avenue at the base of the coal silo. Images of the caboose show it was numbered C31. However, this is unconfirmed at this time.

   Disposition is unknown and presumably scrapped.

LIRR C-70 Caboose

   This caboose was stored in Bush Terminal for a period of time, and would eventually be towed to Gershow Recycling and scrapped.

   It is not confirmed at this time if in fact it was even owned by New York Cross Harbor Railroad.

89' Flatcars

   In 1988 through 1991 (?), the New York Cross Harbor Railroad leased their own fleet of flat cars. These were leased from ITEL Rail Corporation by Interstate BiModal Inc on behalf of New York Cross Harbor Railroad. These cars were former Canadian Pacific Railway 89' 4" Trailer On Flat Car (TOFC) flatcars and The cars were numbered 89100-89199.

   They were equipped to move three 20' containers. It appears that these were also used for the short move of liquid sugar done dockside.


New York Cross Harbor #89111 - May 6, 1990 - Bush Terminal / First Avenue Yard
Loaded with 20' containers of municipal waste.
R. Montag photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 02 May 2012

.

.


New York Cross Harbor #89108 - May 6, 1990 - Bush Terminal / First Avenue Yard
Loaded with 20' containers of municipal waste.
R. Montag photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 06 March 2012

.

.


New York Cross Harbor #89195 - May 6, 1990 - Bush Terminal / First Avenue Yard
Loaded with 20' containers of municipal waste.
R. Montag photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 14 October 2012

   Disposition of these flatcars is unknown, but it is presumed that they have been returned to lessor.

NYCTA Flatcars

   In 1997, the New York Cross Harbor Railroad acquired a pair of ex-New York City Transit Authority flatcars to use as rail & tie cars.

   These cars were located in Greenville, New Jersey until March 2006, it is assumed they were scrapped.

Conrail Gondola #539891

   Conrail gondola #539891 was an old beat up and battered 50' gondola that New York Cross Harbor Railroad used through the 1980's as a carfloat reacher car.

   #529891 had friction bearing trucks and was severely deteriorated. Its disposition is unknown and it is presumably scrapped.

New York Cross Harbor Gondola #58172

   This was a former Western Maryland 50' gondola. Referencing other online archival sites, the 58000 series numbering corresponded to the Western Maryland gondola numbering as well.

   The disposition of this gondola is unknown.


Greenville, NJ - April 14, 1994
C. Perelman photo
P. F. Strubeck collection

added 03 April 2011

.

.

New York Dock Idler Car 101

   #101 was another idler car used by New York Cross Harbor Railroad in the 1980's.

   #101 was acquired from New York Dock, who in turn got it from Bush Terminal. This car was filled with rails for weight and was notched on the ends for ladders.

   Information received from Fred Breimann, (retired Bush Terminal / New York Dock / New York Cross Harbor locomotive engineer) has it that this car was originally an outside braced high side gondola and modified by Bush Terminal.

   It was last seen on its side in Greenville , New Jersey in 1997, and it has presumably been scrapped:


Greenville, NJ - 1997
That is one of the container cranes used in the experimental bogie service behind the reacher car.
Both were presumably scrapped.
John Teichmoeller photo

.

.

Kalmar Container Crane

   New York Cross Harbor Railroad acquired a Kalmar 42-1200 container loader for use at Bush Terminal for the loading of the sludge containers.

   It was painted red and black and had "NYCHRR" painted on the side.

   Disposition unknown.

Pick-up Truck

   The New York Cross Harbor Railroad had an old Ford truck in the 1990's. It was painted blue and was equipped with a work body.

   Disposition unknown.

RETURN TO INDEX


Modeling

.

   Here is a chapter that has needed to have been composed for quite a while. Modeling!

   If anyone has anything they would like to submit, please send it to bedt14@aol.com for inclusion

Prof Klyzlr Models

   John was gracious enough to include articles about modeling the New York Cross Harbor Railroad locomotive #11, #25 and #59!

   Please click the photos below to view each page (PDF format).

#11    #25    #59

Paul  F. Strubeck models:

Tugs

   Here is my model of the "Brooklyn III". It is a stock Walthers kit. However, I have removed some of the Lehigh Valley Railroad details from the model (of which was used as a prototype) and started to rework it to confirm to the Brooklyn III.

   I will also be adding the canopy of course.

RETURN TO INDEX


Memorabilia

.


Locomotive Inspection Report
a gift to from Benjamin W. Schaeffer 
P. M. Goldstein collection
added 10 March 2011

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Switch List
a gift from Benjamin W. Schaeffer 
P. M. Goldstein collection
added 10 March 2011

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pad of Daily Time Record sheets (blank)
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 11 June 2010

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Car Return Label
P. M. Goldstein collection

added 11 June 2010

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Waybill attached to stack of Straight Bills of Lading - January 13, 1995
for Safety Kleen Corp
.
P. M. Goldstein collection

.

RETURN TO INDEX

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As this particular webpage deals with an active railroad, viewers should be aware that:

this webpage or the author is not affiliated with:
.

the New York City Transit Authority,
Metropolitan Transit Authority,
or the City of New York;

.
or any of their subsidieries, holding companies or parent organizations, employees or otherwise;
and no affliation or connection with those companies or municipalities is suggested or implied.

This website and the information contained within has been compiled for the use of reference only, and any inaccuracies are purely accidental.
This webpage sees revision for the purpose of the addition of information, or correction of inaccurate data.

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