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West 37th Street Freight Yard / Pier 77 & 78 - Pennsylvania Railroad

INDUSTRIAL & OFFLINE TERMINAL RAILROADS
OF BROOKLYN, QUEENS, STATEN ISLAND, BRONX & MANHATTAN:


WEST 37TH STREET FREIGHT STATION - PIER 77 & 78
Manhattan

PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD

Pier Station Hudson River Thirty Seventh

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updated:
SUNDAY, 14 OCTOBER 2012 - 15:00


update summary:

date: chapter:
photos of #9316 and #9344 added 14 October 2012 Locomotive Photos

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Visitors please take note !

The collection of images on this website, which continues to grow; is due to the unprecedented and selfless contributions of the current owners of photo archives.

These people made their generous contributions to this website in good will, and allowed me to post their images online for the entire railroading community to view and appreciate, in admiration of these Fallen Flag Railroads.

In return, I strongly request that you please respect the ownership copyrights of those said images.

Other than that, please enjoy the history, thanks for taking the time to visit, and don't forget to sign the guestbook on the main page! 

~ Phil

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INDEX

Overview

Property & Trackage Pier Station Float bridge
Locomotive Overview
 & Photos

Locomotive Roster
builders data, disposition info

Marine Equipment
Overview & Roster

.. ..


Overview

   The date for the start of operations of this facility is unknown, but it is prior to 1897.

   According to the 1920 Joint Report with Comprehensive Plan and Recommendations by the New York, New Jersey Port and Harbor Development Commission; the following figures are given.

Pennsylvania Railroad - West 37th Street

tonnage handled

...

cars handled
inbound

...

cars handled
outbound

inbound

outbound

total

loaded

empty

total

loaded

empty

total




108,172

64,711

172,883 12,317

1,393

13,710

9,180

4,530

1,3710

   This facility would close circa 1975.

 

RETURN TO INDEX

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Property & Trackage

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   The 1885 E. Robinson Property Map seen below, is the earliest map located thus far that shows the presence of the Pennsylvania RR in the vicinity of West 37th Street in Manhattan.

   This "presence" is merely a structure located at the corner of West 35th Street and Twelfth Avenue, and is clearly marked for Pennsylvania Railroad and appears to be a simple bulkhead pier station. It should ne noted that this structure is two blocks south of where the Pennsylvania RR  West 37th Street Freight Yards would actually be located. That property appears to be multitude of semi improved lots. Also, take note that Twelfth Avenue ends at West 37th Street. The E. Robinson map legend denotes the following.
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E. Robinson - 1885

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   The 1891 edition of G. W. Bromley Property Map shows that the basin between West 38th and West 39th Street has been partially filled in and Twelfth Avenue has been extended to connect with West 38th Street. This map also shows that the Pennsylvania Railroad now owns most of the block bordered by West 37th and West 38th Streets and Twelve & Eleventh Avenues with the exception of the row of structures along Eleventh Avenue.

   This map reflects no trackage or float bridge for the Pennsylvania Railroad, and while the West Shore Railroad property located one block south does not show trackage either, we know from the Robinson map above, it in fact does, and this map also reveals the outline of the float bridge and finger piers for the West Shore facility.


G. W. Bromley - 1891

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   By 1897 edition of the G. W. Bromley Property Map, the outlines of a float bridge and finger piers  for the Pennsylvania Railroad are shown, a pier shed ( in  light yellow with light blue border) and a structure at the foot of the float bridge (also in light blue with light blue border) has been constructed and marked "Penna RR Co". Oddly, no trackage is shown, for either the Pennsylvania or West Shore Railroad, yet we know the trackage existed.


G. W. Bromley - 1897

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   By the next edition of the G. W. Bromley Property Maps, (1909) trackage is now shown for the Pennsylvania RR, and West Shore Railroads. We can also see that the Pennsylvania Railroad has already crossed West 38th Street and expanded to the next block north:


G. W. Bromley - 1909

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   According to the legends on the G. W. Bromley map indexes;
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   I have included these construction types to give the reader a better sense of the many types of structure compositions that existed in these freight terminals.

   By 1909, the West 37th Street Yard were quite large and contained a great variety of amenities and services, and in this authors opinion, this location was one of the better equipped Offline Terminal Freight Stations located in Manhattan.

   In viewing all the G. W. Bromley Property Maps above, we can see that Twelfth Avenue ended at West 38th Street and a basin interrupting the right of way of that avenue.

   We can also see that the Pennsylvania Railroad occupied Pier 77 (then numbered 67), but did not occupy Pier 78 (former Pier number 68), and we can see the close proximity of the West 37th Street Freight Yard to its rival West Shore / New York Central Railroad, just across the street to the south. We also see the triangular cattle pens existed at this early date as well as coal pocket and the original freighthouse.

   The following is a Fairchild Aerial Survey Photo from 1924.


Fairchild Aerial Survey Photo -1924
NYPL Digital Archives

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   On 21 June 2010, Jim Guthrie forwarded the Port Facilities Map from 1924. Here is the portion showing the Pennsylvania West 37th Street Freight Yard:


Army Corp of Engineers Port Facilities Map - 1924
courtesy of J. Guthrie

added 22 June 2010

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   In comparing the aerial image from 1924, and the 1950 Valuation Map below, the Pennsylvania Railroad expanded this facility a great deal when the block of buildings between West 39th and West 40th Streets would be razed. This would make room for the construction of the twin diagonal freight houses and an additional four tracks.

   On 30 June 2009, I located the following images in the New York Public Library Digital Archives. The first photo is dated March 17, 1929 and shows the unique lattice frame overhead gantry crane at the Pennsylvania Railroad West 37th Street Freight Station. According to the 1950 ICC Valuation map seen below, this overhead gantry crane has a 30 ton capacity rating.


March 17, 1929
Looking northeast from Twelfth Avenue & West 37th Street.
NYPL Digital Archives

added 01 June 2009

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   The next two images, while also from the NYPL Digital Archives, are erroneously marked for New York Central Railroad in the description, although it is without question that the structure in the photo is marked for the Pennsylvania Railroad.

   The tall structure in the center of the image (behind the box truck) is the ventilation shaft for the first Lincoln Tunnel tube. The Empire State Building can be seen on the extreme right edge of the photo.


October 20, 1939
Looking east from Twelfth Avenue between West 38th and West 39th Streets.
P. L. Sperr photo
NYPL Digital Archives

added 01 July 2009

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October 20, 1939
Looking east from Twelfth Avenue between West 38th and West 39th Streets.
This photo taken just a few feet south of photo above.
P. L. Sperr photo
NYPL Digital Archives

added 01 July 2009

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   Considering the other offline terminals a little farther south in Manhattan (Erie, Lehigh Valley and Baltimore & Ohio), and upon the Pennsylvania Railroad's expansion to the block between West 39th and West 40th Street; the west 37th Street Freight Yard would become the largest offline terminal in the borough.


Pennsylvania RR Valuation Map
- 1950

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   By 1950, as seen in the Pennsylvania Railroad Valuation Map above, this facility offered: 

   The image below, is an aerial photograph taken 1954. From left to right on the west side of the West Side Highway, we can clearly see: 5 loaded station / platform carfloats moored to both sides of  Pier 77, the shadows of the twin float bridge gantries, what appears to be a centercab switcher parked by the north wall of the bulkhead shed, flanking the float bridge lead tracks.

   On the east side of the West Side Highway, we see the triangular stock pens, the twin diagonal freight houses and the long narrow freight platform (running south east / northwest almost the entire length of the terminal) and the original freighthouse in the bottom right corner of the image.

   The grid like object running lengthwise through the middle of the property is excavation work for the south tube of the Lincoln Tunnel, of which construction started in 1951 and completed in 1957. The larger open area towards the left of the opening will be the east ventilation shaft, visible in the 1966 aerial photo below, as the long shadow in the middle of the property.


United States Geological Survey Aerial Photo - 1954

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   By 1966, Piers 77 and 78 would be razed and square building built to the north, and an extra wide pier to the south (out of view in the image below), and it is it is not known if the Pennsylvania Railroad was the occupant of either this new pier and / or structure.


United States Geological Survey Aerial Photo - 1966

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   During 1970, a track connection would be installed between this facility and the former New York Central West 36th Street Yard across the street to the south. Both these yards at this date would be under the ownership of the Penn Central Railroad, and this track connection eliminated the need for the float bridge at this location. Therefore, the West 37th Street float bridge was taken out of service in 1971.

   The photographs below, taken just prior to the installation of this track connection are in all probability, the last images taken of the West 37th Street float bridge in use.

September 1970
Looking west under the West Side Highway at the float bridge and float bridge lead tracks from the freight yard.
A. Roberts photo

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September 1970
Standing under the West Side Highway and looking east.
The lattice girder bracing and supports of the 30 ton travelling crane
can be seen over the nose of the locomotive.
A. Roberts photo

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   It is unknown on what date the freight stations closed, but by 1980 the property is most decidedly vacant, with the structures appearing dilapidated and the float bridge and gantry completely gone.

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Pier Station

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   As mentioned above, the Pennsylvania Railroad West 37th Street Freight Yard was opposite to Pier 77 and 78, which served as Pier Stations for the Pennsylvania Railroad.

   These piers are visible in the 1924 Fairchild Aerial Survey Photo above and would demolished by 1966, in the United States Geological Survey aerial photo of that year.

   These piers would accept and ship car load and less than carload freight. Freight would be transferred directly to and from the freight cars while loaded on the carfloats and moored to the piers.


Pennsylvania Railroad Pier 78 - Stock Yard - May 17, 1927
Looking southwest - G. W. Lewis livestock boat tied up to pier on right and tug approaching on extreme right edge of photo
Rubble in foreground is being used to fill in West 38th Street basin and allow Twelfth Avenue to continue north.
P. L. Sperr photo
NYPL Digital Archives

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Pennsylvania Railroad Pier 78 - Stock Yard - October 31, 1931
Looking west - tracks in foreground lead from float bridge to West 37th Street Freight Yard &
cattle boat tied up to pier on right.
P. L. Sperr photo
NYPL Digital Archives

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Pennsylvania Railroad Pier 78 - Cattle Pens - January 28, 1932
Looking east note PRR West 37th Street Railyard in background.
P. L. Sperr photo
NYPL Digital Archive
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RETURN TO INDEX

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Float Bridge

   The float bridge located the Pennsylvania Railroad West 37th Street facility, was a double apron overhead gantry type, which was quite unusual for a single float bridge location.

   It is believed that this would be the only type of float bridge installed at this facility.

   It is unknown on what date it was removed, but by viewing an aerial photo dated 1980, the float bridge and gantries are completely gone.

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Locomotive Overview

Steam Locomotives

   Based on the start of operations date for the West 37th Street Freight Yard (ca. 1897); it is without question that steam locomotives must have operated at this location until at least 1925 and upon the passage of the Kaufman Act, which in effect eliminated the use of steam locomotives within city limits; those railroads operating with the city confines had to turn to alternate methods of motive power.

   You can read more about the Kaufman Act on the main page of this website: Kaufman Act.

   The Kaufman Act essentially banned steam locomotive operations in the City of New York; and steam locomotives both at this facility and at Pennsylvania Railroad's North 4th Street operated possibly as late as 1928 or 1929, as such time when #3905 and / or #3906 (internal combustion locomotives) were constructed and delivered..

   The overwhelming problem facing my current research at this time is that the Pennsylvania Railroad, being the "standard railroad" of the world, fielded such a large roster of locomotives conducive of switching operations (0-4-0T and 0-6-0T) and of which would be applicable at this facility (i.e: side / saddletank, fuel bunker mounted on locomotive).

   As other trunk line / Class 1 railroads (both at online and offline terminals) used 0-6-0T locomotives in Manhattan, so there is a distinct possibility the Pennsylvania Railroad could have used this wheel arrangement in Manhattan as well.

   According to "Pennsy Power" by Alvin Staufer; the PRR had on their roster on July 1, 1924:

  •  140  "Class A" (0-4-0 wheel arrangement) locomotives, and:

  •  790  "Class B" (0-6-0 wheel arrangement) locomotives!

   

   Granted, not all Class A or Class B locomotives would be of side / saddletank variety, but you can surmise the amount of locomotives that I would have to research just to determine which were and which were not of side / saddletank type, before even beginning to search through photographs to determine which were taken in Manhattan!

   On top of which, most of the Class A and Class B locomotives were used at various roundhouses and service shops throughout the Pennsylvania Railroad system for shifting  larger locomotives around, and with the Pennsylvania Railroad constructing and / or owning rather large fleets of steam powered switchers, it is unlikely any one locomotive was assigned permanently to this facility, not to mention the docks and wharfs in Philadelphia and the industrial sidings at Frankford Junction Terminal. The mere thought of attempting this research is giving me shudders! 

   This being the case, leaves it nearly impossible to find out exactly which locomotives had indeed operated at the Brooklyn and Manhattan locations and basically, the only way to learn which steam locomotives operated at this location would be by locating photographs. Unfortunately, no photographs of steam locomotives operating at North 4th Street Freight Station have surfaced to date.

   So, therefore I call upon those Pennsylvania Railroad historians, experts and photo collectors and dealers to assist in this part of research.

   To give a representative example of the type of locomotive that might be seen in Brooklyn and / or Manhattan; the following three steam locomotive images, are courtesy of North East Rails "Pennsylvania RR Steam Power Roster". Please keep in mind the pictured locomotives have not been confirmed to have operated in Brooklyn or Manhattan locations at this time, but are the locomotives that were most likely to have worked at these two Pennsylvania RR offline terminal locations.


Class A1: (formerly Class Q - 0-4-0T) - unknown location  
years built: 1886-1892
quantity built: 8
driver diameter: 44"

unknown photographer
North East Rails archives

added 12 March 2010

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Class A2a (formerly class Q - 0-4-0T), unknown location
years built: 1887-1891: Altoona, PA
quantity built: 7
driver diameter: 50"
unknown photographer
added 12 March 2010

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Class A3a: (formerly Class A3 0-4-0T) - Meadows, NJ
years built: 1900-1902 - Altoona, PA
P. W. Prescott photo
collection of G. Mittner collection
added 12 March 2010

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Internal Combustion Locomotives

   While it is not known what steam locomotives were assigned to this yard, the "story" is slightly different for gasoline and diesel - electric locomotives and we currently and conclusively know of three such locomotives. But again, based on the large fleet of locomotives fielded by the Pennsylvania Railroad, it is very likely many more operated here.

   The three locomotives known to work at this facility, are PRR #3905, PRR #3906 and PC #9369 seen below. We know there must have been other locomotives to have worked at this facility, but photographs and documentation are disappointingly lacking at this time.

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PRR #3905

   #3905 is no stranger to the the offline terminals of New York area, as this locomotive has also been photographed in 1946, working the Pennsylvania Railroad's offline terminal located in Brooklyn, the North 4th Street Freight Station.

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PRR #3906

   Previously, it was thought that #3906 was assigned to another part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, outside of New York. This is now known to be partially untrue, as the photographs below clearly show #3906 operating at the West 37th Street facility in 1936.

   It is now apparent with #3905 being photographed at the West 37th Street facility as well, that both locomotives could very well be found at either facility, even though at this time we have no photographic proof of #3906 ever having been operated at the North 4th Street Freight Station.

Please take note:

   Unconfirmed at this time; is the authors supposition that the Pennsylvania Railroad may have been "inspired" to construct #3905 & #3906 in response to and as a direct result of the Kaufman Act. As both #3905 & #3906 were constructed shortly after the first (or 1926) deadline of the Kaufman Act, (with #3905 being constructed in 1928 and #3906 following shortly thereafter in 1929), and as both of these locomotives were used at North 4th Street and West 37th Street Freight Stations, of which locations both fell under the jurisdiction of the Kaufman Act.

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PRR #3908 / PRR #5911 / PC #8511

   On 28 March 2010, I happened to be on one of my "bored moment searches" on eBay. This means I hunker down with a snack and a drink, and do a general search without engine number or location. This day, I was searching through the hundreds of Pennsylvania Railroad locomotive photos. In regards to the Pennsylvania Railroad, this means looking at a long list of generic (and mostly uninteresting) photos.

   Looking through the thumbnails, I happened across a image of a Pennsylvania diesel-electric switcher locomotive with a girder framework visible behind the engine. Even at the tiny thumbnail image size, I said to myself, "Wow, that girder framework looks familiar". I clicked on "enlarge", and the image opened to full size.

   As I examined the image more closely, I noticed that the girder frame was in fact an overhead gantry (my original suspicion) that looked remarkably like the overhead gantry at West 37th Street. Unfortunately, the gantry and nothing else stuck out in the photo to identify the location. That is until I looked at the upper left corner of the image and saw a sign that reads: "Lincoln Tunnel / 40th Street Exit". Now I had no doubt, this was Manhattan!

   And what about the locomotive? It was an SW profile bearing #5911. Ok, I now knew I had another locomotive to add to the roster. I took out my copy of Pennsy Power II (obtained from my father before he passed on... Thanks Dad!) and started looking for the diesel pages, but no #5911. There were a few Baldwin VO's in the 5900 range, but no 5911.

   So I took a chance that the locomotive survived into Penn Central era, and looked up the  locomotive number conversions PRR > PC in the back of Penn Central Bi-Annual. Sure enough, #5911 was renumbered Penn Central #8511. Flipping back to the model breakdown pages, I learned this was an EMC model SW1, or Pennsylvania Railroad Class AA5. Ok I thought, a "common" SW1. But reading further I was astounded to learn that #5911 was originally Pennsylvania Railroad #3908! Now that locomotive I knew from the two page spread in Pennsy Power II.

   For those of you "not in the know", #3908 was Pennsylvania Railroad's first "GM" diesel locomotive. #3908 was built by "EMC" (ElectroMotive Corporation). In 1930, General Motors had the foresight to enter the diesel locomotive field with the purchase of the Winton Engine Company. Examining Winton sales records, GM decided to purchase Winton's primary customer, which was EMC. On January 1,1941 and following this great success of locomotive construction, GM merged the locomotive engine division of Winton and EMC into the "ElectroMotive Division of General Motors" better known in railroading industry as "EMD".

   Fortunately, between Pennsy Power 2 and Penn Central Bi-Annual, the history on #3908 / #5911/ #8511 is plentiful:

   #3908 was EMC construction number 680 as part of a one unit order from Pennsylvania Railroad (Order E170). #3908 would be constructed with the standard Winton model 201A eight cylinder engine, having an 8" bore by 10" stroke (which multiplied by the eight cylinders, equalled 4021 cubic inch / 335 cubic feet displacement). Horsepower rating was 600. EMC called this a "SW" model, as it was constructed with a welded frame as opposed to the "SC" which has a cast frame. The electrical systems, generator and traction motors came from General Electric.

    In 1942, Pennsylvania Railroad would renumber #3908 to #5911. In 1958, this locomotive would be re-engined with an EMD 567A V6, which had the same horsepower rating.

    Upon the creation of Penn Central (from the merger of Pennsylvania and New York Central Railroads) on February 1, 1968, #5911 would be renumbered #8511. As this locomotive was retired in April of that year, it would only carry her PC number for about two months.

   At this time, it is unknown if this locomotive was permanently assigned to the West 37th Street Freight Yard, and if it was, during what period of time, or if this locomotive operated at this facility under #3908 or #8511.

   Sadly from online research, it does not appear the #3908 / #5911 / #8511 survived the scrappers torch.

   Thankfully however, with this "little" find on eBay; we have not only added a locomotive to the roster for this location but added a locomotive the fills the time gap in the roster between #3905 & 3906 and the Penn Central locomotive below. As fortune would have it; a rather historic locomotive at that!

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PRR #9316 and 9344

After such a long period of idleness for this location, I happened across not one, but two slides of locomotives operating at this facility. These slides appeared on eBay on two separate occasions from two different sellers but within a few days of one another. And to add to the joy, the slides are of two different GE 44 Ton locomotives at West 37th Street Freight Yard.

   The first slide taken by Norman E. Kohl; is dated 2/18/1954 is of #9316 working the float bridges. Matter of fact, if one looks closely enough, the engineer is reading a newspaper. Must have been break time!

   The second slide, dated 7 years later, and from the collection of Al Chione, (but no photograher is listed) and is dated 4/15/1961. It shows GE 44 tonner #9344 working the yard in the early morning.

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PC #9369

   The Allan Roberts photos of #9369 below provided a few hours of minor angst, followed by a few moments of joy for this author.

   I have never been real knowledgeable regarding the Pennsylvania, New York Central or Penn Central Railroads. While Pennsy had a few locomotives I am fond of, (all their electric models, and a few of their weird experimental steam designs), I freely admit to not being very adept at researching the "common" locomotives.

   Making matters worse, was the merger with New York Central forming the Penn Central. Making matters even more frustrating, was the conversion and merging of New York Central locomotive classification system with Pennsylvania's into the Penn Central's! (i.e: Penn Central #9369 was an ALCo model S3. As New York Central #901, this was a DES9 class. The Pennsylvania Railroad class for this model locomotive was AS6m, and while the Penn Central classed this locomotive as an AS6m as well, it was never a PRR locomotive!)

   But those are just some of the problems incurred in and with research of this type. Then, at one o'clock in the morning, with a foggy brain and blurry eyes, I had a brain storm: reference my copy of "Penn Central System Bi-Annual" by Robert H. Reid. Sure enough after a few minutes of excitedly flipping pages, I found the AS6m roster which, is listed by manufacturer's model: ALCo S3! Simplicity in itself! (Thanks Mr. Reid, wherever you are...)

   So #9369 had been identified, and its builder's information and its New York Central heritage listed.

   


#3905 - unknown date - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY 
Note cattle pens in background.
unknown photographer
courtesy of Bob's Photos
via S. Berliner

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#3905 - unknown date - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY
unknown photographer
courtesy of Bob's Photos
via S. Berliner

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#3905 - unknown date - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY 
Note West Side Highway in left background.
unknown photographer
G. Collora archives
authors collection

added 08 March 2010

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#3905 - ca. 1937 - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY 
Note West Side Highway in left background and lattice girders of the overhead gantry to right of locomotive.

J. C. La Rue, Jr. photo
via S. Berliner

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#3906 - November 14, 1936 - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY
Under West Side Highway - looking south - float bridge to right, freight yard visible to left of engine.
courtesy of Bob's Photos
via S. Berliner

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#3906 - November 14, 1936 - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY
Under West Side Highway - looking north - float bridge to left, freight yard to right.
courtesy of Bob's Photos
via S. Berliner

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#9316 - February 18, 1954 - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY
looking west
N. E. Kohl photo
authors collection

added 14 October 2012

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#9316 - April 15, 1961 - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY
looking northeast
A. Chione duplicate slide
authors collection

added 14 October 2012

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#9369 - September 1970 - West 37th Street, Manhattan, NY
Looking west at the float bridge and float bridge lead tracks.
A. Roberts photo
via T. Flagg

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West 37th Street Freight Station (PRR) Locomotive Roster

railroad number / name builder c/n build
date

gauge
wheel
arrangement
model driver
dia.

cylinders

acquired

disposition
notes ref
PRR 3905 PRR
Altoona Shops
4193 5/22/1928 std. B   38"     PRR class A6
retired prior 1959
65 ton [41]
[45]
[a]
PRR 3906 PRR
Altoona Shops
4206 5/1929 std. B   38"     PRR class A6
retired prior 1959
65 ton  
PRR 3908 EMC 680 6/1937 std. B-B SW1     new PRR class AAA5 / ES6
re# PRR 5911: 1942
re-engined 1952
re# PC 8511: 2/1968
retired: 4/1968
97 ton
[c]
[41]
[42]
PRR 9316 GE 30132 3/1949  std. B-B 44 Ton
centercab
    new PRR Class GS4
seen in 1954 aerial image & 1954 slide

all PRR 44 ton retired  (except 9353 / 9999)
by 1966
[b]  
PRR 9344 GE std. B-B 44 Ton
centercab
new
PC 9369 ALCo 78230 9/1950 std. B-B S3     used
ex-NYC #901
unknown    

Locomotive Footnotes:

[a]

The following information is courtesy of Sam Berliner's website (with J. F. Campbell information) and Pennsy Power II  (A. Staufer &  B. Pennybacker);
#3905 was completed Altoona Shops, 5/22/1928.
It was originally equipped with an 8-cylinder solid injection 500 HP Diesel engine (4-cycle)
purchased from Bessemer Gas Engine Co of Grove City, PA, and a Westinghouse model 476 generator and 355 traction motors.
Testing in the Altoona yards proved that the Bessemer Diesel engine couldn't handle the intended tasks
so it was replaced with a Winton model 148 gasoline engine rated at 400 HP, as was {done to} their second unit (#3906)
#3906 was built a year later. Both locomotives retired prior to 1959.

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PRR #3905 & #3906 (A6) specifications:
weight:
length:
horsepower:
gear ratio:
starting tractive effort:
continuous tractive effort:
maximum speed:
continuous speed:
130,000 lbs. (65 tons)
26' 10" (coupler - coupler)
400 hp
76:16
32,500 lbs.
7,500 lbs.
20 mph
16 mph

[b] In the 1954 aerial image above, a centercab locomotive appears to be "parked" next to north wall of the bulkhead shed, just off the float bridge lead tracks.

.[c]. PRR #3908 / #5911 (AA5) specifications (as built)
weight:
length:
horsepower:
gear ratio:
fuel capacity:
starting tractive effort:
continuous tractive effort:
top speed:
continuous speed
194,000 lbs (97 tons)
44' 5"
(coupler - coupler)
600 hp
62:15
600 gallons
48,500 lbs
23,500 lbs
65 mph
7.5 mph

Sam Berliner has a remarkable website on Boxcab Locomotives. Please feel free to visit at:

S. Berliner Boxcab Index

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Marine Vessels & Equipment

   Being a Pennsylvania Railroad operation; the Pier Stations and float bridge would have been serviced by the Pennsylvania Railroad marine fleet

   Keeping in mind the significant fleet of marine equipment that the Pennsylvania Railroad owned and operated, a Marine Roster on this website would not be beneficial or justified; and therefore will not be forthcoming.

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West 27th St Freight Yard  (LV)

Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal...

New York New Jersey Rail / Port Jersey

South Brooklyn Terminal / Brooklyn Marginal.

West 28th St Freight Sta  (Erie / EL)
Brooklyn Wharf & Warehouse North 1st Street Freight Sta  (NYNHH) 25th St / South Brooklyn Terminal  (DLW) West 37th St Freight Sta  (PRR)

Development of Car Float Transfer Bridges in New York Harbor

Comprehensive List of Float Bridges located in New York Harbor

Railroad Operated Pier Stations of Manhattan

List of Railroad Operated Diesel Powered Tugboats of the Eastern Seaboard

Miscellaneous Freight Railroad Images of New York City

Double Ended Wreckers of the New York Area

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Glossary of Definitions Indicative to Rail / Marine Terminal Operations in New York Harbor

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