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Industrial & Offline Terminal Railroads of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx & Manhattan; New York

Industrial
Offline
Contract
Switching
Rail Marine
Pocket Terminal
Brooklyn
Kings
Queens
Staten Island
Richmond
Bronx
Manhattan
New York City
Long Island
Freight
Harbor
Port
Pier Station
Shortline
Wharf
Railroad
Trains
Steam
Diesel

Gas
Gasoline
Oil
Electric
Mechanical


Locomotive
Locomotives
Sidetank
Saddletank
Dockside
Tank Engine
Street Running
Steeplecab
Boxcab
Switcher
Dinky
Dummy
All Over Cab
Carfloat
Interchange
Platform
Centerpipe
Car Ferry

Tugboat
Barge
Lighter
Wood
Howe Truss
Pontoon
Pony Plate
Steel Girder
Float Bridge 
Transfer

www.freightrrofnyc.info

clockwise from top left:

Bush Terminal #4 Brooklyn
Atlas Terminal no # Queens
American Dock #1 Staten Island
Erie RR #612 Manhattan
Harlem Transfer #1 Bronx

ail marine pier station lighterage contract independent

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Website updated:

TUESDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 2014 - 18:20

. This website designed to be viewed on widescreen (16:10 ratio) monitors and MSIE @ 100%.


UPDATE LIST
(last 60 days)

update summary

date

location

leased locomotives GMTX 2200, 2202, 2213, carfloat 278, service to Sims Recycling added
Atlas Terminal locomotive donated to Shore Line Trolley Museum

Goodwin Gallagher page removed
18 February 2014 New York New Jersey Rail / Port Jersey
Atlas Terminal


MAIN INDEX

  • Alphabetical Page Index of Industrial & Offline Terminal Railroads in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx and Manhattan:
SI

American Dock Company

.. Brx Harlem Station  (Erie / EL) .. Bkn

South Brooklyn

Qns

Astoria Light, Heat & Power

Brx Harlem Transfer  (Erie / Joint / DLW) Bkn

South Brooklyn Terminal / Brooklyn Marginal

Bkn

Atlantic, Gulf & Pacific

Bkn Jay Street Terminal / Connecting Bkn

25th St / South Brooklyn Terminal  (DLW)

Qns Atlas Terminal Bkn New York Cross Harbor Mn 207th St Yard  (IND / NYCTA)
Brx Bronx Terminal  (CRRNJ) Bkn New York Dock Bkn Wallabout Terminal  (DLW)
Brx Bronx Terminal  (LV) Bkn New York New Jersey Rail / Port Jersey Bkn Wallabout Station  (Erie)
Bkn

Brooklyn Ash Removal

Bkn North 1st Street Freight Station  (BO / NYNHH) Bkn

Wallabout Union  (PRR, NYC, LV, BO)

Bkn

Brooklyn Dock & Terminal

Bkn North 4th St Freight Station  (PRR) Mn

West 15th Street Freight Yard  (CRRNJ)

Bkn

Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal

Qns Phelps - Dodge Mn

West 23th St Freight Sta  (NYLE&W / Erie)

Bkn Brooklyn Wharf & Warehouse SI Pouch Terminal Mn West 26th St Freight Sta  (BO)
Bkn Bush Terminal SI Procter & Gamble Mn West 27th St Freight Yard  (LV)
Qns Degnon Contracting / Degnon Terminal Qns Queens Subway Apartment & Loft Building Mn West 28th St Freight Sta  (Erie / EL)
Bkn G & R Packing Bx Rikers Island Mn West 37th St Freight Sta  (PRR)
Bkn Seatrain Shipbuilding


Hello & Welcome!

   This website is a compilation of the histories of the offline freight terminals, industrial concerns with railroad operations and pier stations that were operated by railroads and that were located throughout Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, the Bronx and Manhattan.

   Included in each chapter you will find the data (where known) for the locomotives that operated for the companies and facilities listed on this website. To date, almost all of the steam locomotives that operated for these concerns, were of sidetank or saddletank in some configuration or another. The electric "juice jacks" and internal combustion locomotives were as eclectic and varied as one can find: center cab, offset cab, box cab, steeple cab, and open cab; gas-mechanical, oil-mechanical and diesel-electric. These chapters also include, where known and where applicable; the marine equipment (tugboats, carfloats, lighters, etc) and the respective specifications for those vessels for the companies that operated them.

    For those of you who are just "finding" this page for the first time, this particular website grew out of my primary research topic, the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal. As I found it difficult if not impossible, to discuss the BEDT and not refer to the histories and rosters of the neighboring Rail - Marine / Offline Contract Terminals, Industrial Railroads and some of the businesses associated with them; this page was created to cover the histories of those companies and their locomotives.

   In searching through the records of various locomotive builders for data concerning the locomotives owned by the rail - marine companies on this website, in turn led me to "discover" small industrial concerns in the New York Metropolitan Area that operated locomotives as well. So these companies in turn were researched and listed on this website as well.

   While the content of this website was originally concerned only with those railroads operating in Brooklyn and Queens, it gradually expanded over time to include two very small but old terminal railroads in Staten Island, that operated some very unique locomotives. And then the website expanded to include the offline terminal operations in the Bronx. The final expansion of the website came about while I was researching railroad operated pier stations and offline terminals located in Manhattan, so those pages were created as well.

   It should also be noted that this website and the information contained on those webpages is constantly evolving, being updated and in some cases, corrected. Revisions are listed by individual page in the "update list" located at the very top of this page.

   It must be noted that I cannot take full credit for all the efforts on this website, as the information you see before you is due to the collaborative efforts of many people who have contributed to this website  and they should be recognized as well. These people and their contributions are listed in alphabetical order in the "special thanks" chapter at the bottom of this page, but I am especially indebted to and grateful for the continuous contributions and assistance from many people, most notably: Joseph Roborecky, Fred Breimann, (both of whom are retired Brooklyn Offline Terminal locomotive engineers) as well as Thomas Flagg, Benjamin W. Schaefer, Jay Held, Ed Bommer and Paul Strubeck; all fine historians in their own right.

   Photographs come from a variety of notable "old time" collections; Everett DeGoyler, F. Rodney Dirkes, Harold Fagerberg, Gerald Landau, Bradford Stiles, Frank Zahn and from the digital archives of the Brooklyn Public, New York Public and New York State Libraries. Images also come from "modern" collections such as Gene Collora, Tim Darnell, Mike DeLuca, Matt Herson and Dave Keller, among many others and from either photographs they themselves took or acquired over the years.

   Of course, all photographs pertaining to the locations covered are welcome!  If you have images you would like to have displayed, please feel free to contact me at the email link below.

   Be sure to visit my website on:

Military Railroads of the New York Metropolitan Area
www.militaryrrofnyc.info

   All photographic contributions (specific to the locations covered) are welcome!  Please free free to submit your images to BEDT14@aol.com. You will of course be given due credit!

  ~ VISITORS PLEASE READ ~

The collection of images contained within this website,
is due to the unprecedented and selfless contributions of the current owners of those photo archives.

These people have made their generous contributions to this website in good will and have allowed me to post those images online for the entire railroading community to view and appreciate in admiration of these fallen flag railroads.

In return, I strongly request that you please request the ownership copyrights on those said images.

.

   Other than that, please enjoy the history and thanks for taking the time to visit this website and don't forget to:

Sign the Guestbook !

Philip M. Goldstein
Margaretville, NY


Preface

.

   When one actually stops and compiles a list of all the railroads that once operated in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, the Bronx or Manhattan, that list actually becomes quite impressive, and in fact will reflect more operating entities than some states in the U.S. and most countries in the world!

   Normally, when railroads of Brooklyn are mentioned, one tends to either think of the four Rail-Marine contract terminals, those being the: Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, Bush Terminal, New York Dock and the Jay Street Terminal.

   Or, one may think of the many steam powered (and later electric streetcar) passenger railroads that once operated and that were eventually absorbed into the Transit System. If one thought of Staten Island, the Staten Island Railway (another predominant passenger railroad once operated by the Baltimore & Ohio RR) is forefront in the majority of railfans recollections.

   While Queens was home to the LIRR's Long Island City Freight Yards & Float Bridge, this facility wasn't "technically" off line, being it was connected to the Hell Gate Bridge after 1917 via Sunnyside Junction, but BEDT's Pidgeon Street Yard was indisputably offline. As far as I can tell, this was the only offline terminal located in Queens. 

   The Bronx and Manhattan also had several offline terminals as well, but these were all operated by trunk line / Class 1 railroads (B&O, LV, Erie & PRR). There was also the New York Central freight routes running through city streets, but I consider this operation to be "online" (and therefore not covered by this website) as it was in fact connected to mainline trackage via bridges in the Bronx.

   Yet despite all the knowledge of these operations, there were in fact other offline freight railroads located in Brooklyn, that have hardly been mentioned in contemporary accounts, if at all; as well as the hardly known industrial railroads that operated in the the five boroughs of New York City.

   As such, all of the terminal railroads covered on my websites, are known as "offline terminals". The accepted definition of an "offline terminal" is such that a railroad terminal with no physical rail connection to the mainland rail network of the United States. The only method of freight car transfer to and from the mainland rail network to these terminals was by carfloat.

   Until December 2008, this website did not cover the following "offline" terminals operated by the Class 1 railroads:

Trunk Line / Class 1 - Offline Freight Terminals
(previously not covered by this website)

borough facility railroad
Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bronx
Bronx
Bronx

Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan
25th Street
Wallabout Basin
North 4th Street
North 1st Street
Bronx Terminal
Bronx Terminal
Harlem Station

West 37th Street
West 28th Street
West 27th Street
West 26th Street

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western

Pennsylvania
New York, New Haven & Hartford
Central Railroad of New Jersey
Lehigh Valley
Erie
/ Erie Lackawanna
Pennsylvania
Erie / Erie Lackawanna
Lehigh Valley
Baltimore & Ohio

.

   While the Harlem Transfer has been covered on my website for some time, this was largely due to the fact it was originally a joint venture (shared facility) until 1906, when at such time it was purchased outright by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. But even after this occurred, it had been operated as wholly owned subsidiary of its own accord and identity. The design of the Harlem Transfer Company, which it shares in most degrees with two other Bronx facilities; is unique in the fact that is has a circular freight house and concentric circular access trackage.

   Save for that one facility though, I had intentionally omitted all the other Class 1 offline terminals from my website. This decision was made for the most part, because I felt that with the plethora of information already published both in bound form and on the internet, and with so many leisurely and professional historians working on the histories of the Long Island Railroad and the Baltimore & Ohio / Staten Island Railway, as well as the other Class 1 railroads, I would be duplicating efforts already undertaken. I eventually realized this was an error on my part.

    In fact, there did not appear to be an overwhelming amount of published material on quite a few of these Class 1 terminals located outside of Manhattan. In my opinion, detailed histories of Pennsylvania Railroad's North 4 Street Terminal, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad's 25th Street and Wallabout Terminals (all of which were located in Brooklyn); were practically non-existent and desperately needed.

   I also found a severe lack of information on the web of the Lehigh Valley and Erie Railroad facilities in the Bronx. The Central Railroad of New Jersey's Bronx Terminal has received a bit more publicity (being the subject of Tim Warris' model building website); but an actual dedicated history on that Central Railroad of New Jersey Bronx Terminal was not to be found either. In the process of researching the Pennsylvania Railroads' North 4th Street Freight Station, it was discovered that a very early and short lived offline terminal had been located at North 1st Street! This facility was constructed by the Baltimore & Ohio RR in 1898 and subsequently sold to New York, New Haven & Hartford RR until it's demise around 1918; but until now, this location eluded discovery or mention in contemporary accounts or in research by present day historians.

   I also did not intend to create a page on the shared Wallabout Union Freight Station operation (Pennsylvania, New York Central, Lehigh Valley and Baltimore & Ohio Railroads) or the Wallabout Station of the Erie Railroad. Both of these facilities are kind of odd balls, as they were pier stations only; with no trackage or float bridge. Carfloats would simply be moored to the pier, and freight and commodities removed directly from the freight cars to the pier sheds. But their contribution to railroading history in Brooklyn was without fanfare until now.   

   Therefore, with the dedicated assistance of Joseph Roborecky, Tom Flagg, Paul Strubeck, Jay Held, John Teichmoeller and many other fine contributors, these Class 1 Offline Terminals located in Brooklyn, Bronx, Manhattan were researched, images located and now pages have been created and added to this website detailing the histories of these locations. Also added was the New York City's Float Bridge located at their 207th Street Yard in north Manhattan.  

   All told, there are now forty separate locations on which the histories and operations of Industrial & Terminal Railroads in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island & the Bronx & Manhattan are covered by this website, plus the "photo albums" of the Manhattan Pier Stations & Inland Freight Stations, the page of photos of street running freight trains of New York Central railroad in Manhattan and current modern day freight operations in Brooklyn & Staten Island, the Glossary page, the page on the Development of the Carfloat Transfer Bridge in New York Harbor, the Comprehensive List of Transfer Bridges in New York Harbor page and the List of Diesel Powered Railroad Tugboats of the East Coast!

.

Trunk Line / Class 1 - Online Freight Terminals Not Covered

   For the time being, the following locations in New York will remain to be omitted from this website for the following two reasons:

      a. These rail marine / carfloating terminals were technically connected to the mainland United States rail network; and / or
      b. They have been extensively covered in printed and internet publications.

   Those locations being the:

borough facility railroad
Brooklyn 65th Street / Bay Ridge Terminal

New York, New Haven & Hartford / Long Island Rail Road 1

Queens Long Island City Long Island Rail Road 2
Staten Island.. St. George Baltimore & Ohio 3
Manhattan West 130th, 60th, 36th, & 33th Streets..
and St. Johns Park
New York Central & Hudson River /
New York Central 4
Bronx Oak Point
Hell Gate Yard
Port Morris
Bronx Terminal Market
New York, New Haven & Hartford
"     "  "     "  "    "  "      "      "          " 
New York Central
"     "  "    "  "        "

      1  via the Hell Gate Bridge
      2  
via Sunnyside Yard and the East River Tunnels or over the Hell Gate Bridge
      3  
via the Arthur Kill vertical lift bridge to New Jersey
      4  
via several bridges crossing the Harlem River

.   

   Again, even though I had no intention to cover online terminals in the New York Metropolitan Area, I came across several interesting photographs of New York Central Freight Service (street running albeit "pre-High Line") in New York City. As I feel the photos are historically important, so I have included those images on their own page strictly as a photo album. You may view those images here. 

   If you should desire information on those first three locations above, I highly recommend these three resources:

      1.   Steve Lynch's & Dave Keller's "LIRR website", and the books:
      2.  "The New York Connecting Railroad" by  Robert C. Sturm and William G. Thom, as well as
      3.  "New York Harbor Railroads in Color, Volumes 1 and 2", by Thomas Flagg.

.


"What you see here" or:
Accuracy & Contradictions in Data & Opinion

.

   I also think is bears mentioning that every so often, a contradiction in data surfaces. Research from one publication or author contradicts information from another. Naturally, on occasion; it becomes very difficult to determine the truth. I know this personally after many exchanges of dialog and research with other historians, and it can become confusing.

   But I assure you, the contributors to this website and myself have taken the utmost care and great pains to uncover, discover, research, reiterate and elaborate on this data accurately. Matter of fact, I and other contributors to this website take our research to extreme levels, and verify information through several sources and where possible, through former employees and documents, including but not limited to official documentation: Interstate Commerce Commission / Surface Transportation Board Reports, Sanborn Maps, Department of Docks & Ferries Annual Reports, Moody's Investment Reports, Real Estate, Property & Tax Maps, Vessel / Locomotive Builders Records, and where possible Company Documents; etc.

   While this does not always guarantee 100% accuracy, you can be assured the information contained in this work is of the highest quality possible and not merely copied from sources such as popular railfan publications and accounts, etc; and assumed to be correct.

   There is the reason for this. I have said so many times; once errors (whether accidental or intentional due to obstinance or ignorance) have been published in printed & bound format, they cannot be repaired. Hence one reason why I have chosen NOT to publish this website in bound & printed format. Which is also why you see an update list at the top of this website.

   Therefore in cases of contradictory data from independent sources, both (or all) versions are usually listed with my/our notes. Only where and when I state that text or information is of personal opinion or hypothesis, is information not conclusive.

   After discussing the finer points of this website with many established authors, recognized historians, former employees, et al; you will find the majority of the information on this website correct and extremely well researched.

   Despite our best efforts and every so often, a genuine error rears its ugly head. Please do not hesitate to contact us with correction submissions at: bedt14@aol.com.

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Facility Definitions

.

   As for the definition of facility, some readers might find themselves asking what is the difference between an "industrial railroad" and an "offline terminal railroad". There are now actually five distinct categories of freight railroads discussed within this website:
.

Offline Terminal Railroads.
.

.
Industrial or Private Railroads.
.

.
Pier Stations

.
   For an in-depth list of terms and definitions with illustrations; please visit the Glossary.

   With that being stated; any readers who might have questions, comments, suggestions, information or contributions are more than welcome to contact me:


Philip M. Goldstein
(845) 586-4672
bedt14@aol.com




   Now, without further delay; I present to you Industrial & Offline Terminal Railroads of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, the Bronx and Manhattan...


A Glimpse of the Way Things Were

.

   It is the year 1870. Ulysses S. Grant is in the White House after being elected president following a successful victory in the Civil War. Walrus mustaches are popular among men, and top hats are in. The Department of Justice is created as a government agency. The Army Weather Bureau is created, and this would become the National Weather Service. The current Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is placed in service, the transcontinental railroad celebrates its 1 year anniversary. There are no electric lights and either the mail or the telegraph is the means of communicating long distance, (even though a gentleman inventor by the name of Alexander Graham Bell is tinkering with acoustic telegraphy, which in a a few years yields a device that will eventually become known as the telephone).

   In New York City; the Statue of Liberty does not exist and just north, Ellis Island, known then as Castle Garden, is beginning to bustle with freshly arrived immigrants looking to become Americans. North Manhattan is wild forests. Staten Island is similar with a smattering of farms. Brooklyn and Queens are highly developed the closer you get to New York Harbor, but the eastern edges of Brooklyn & Queens are what would be considered "rural", and farmland dominated the view. Long distance travel, primarily via horse drawn wagon; is beginning to give way to the railroads. But, horse drawn carriages and small steam locomotive drawn street cars were the way to travel anywhere out of walking distance within the city.

   Long Island (which is comprised of Kings [Brooklyn], Queens, Nassau & Suffolk Counties, and Staten Island [Richmond County] were truly isolated from the mainland US. There are no bridges or tunnels spanning the East or Hudson Rivers. The Brooklyn Bridge would not be opened until 1883 and the Manhattan, Williamsburg, Queensboro or George Washington Bridges would not be built until many years after that. There are no Holland, Lincoln or Queens Midtown Tunnels.

   The only way to transport anything to these locations was by water: either by ship, boat, lighter or barge. If you found it necessary to go from Brooklyn or Queens to Manhattan, or from Staten Island or New Jersey to Manhattan, you would have to take a ferry. The waterborne vessels of this period are powered either by wind and sail or primitive steam power and coal is starting to increase as the fuel of choice for furnaces and boilers, which are used for heat or propulsion power.

   The "second" industrial revolution is underway in earnest, and the mass production of consumer goods is taking hold. To get the raw materials, commodities and items from the mainland to Long Island, everything was shipped by water from New Jersey to Manhattan and Long Island. Today, it is difficult to envision this isolation with the myriad of bridges, highways, and tunnels (and gridlock!) linking Brooklyn, Queens and Long Island with the mainland.

   As a result of this waterborne traffic, many dockside terminals and warehouses were built around the New York City proper for storage. The large mainland trunk line (or known later on as Class 1) railroads had their own equipment and properties; namely: tugboats, lighters, barges and ferries to bring these commodities to and from various mainland railroad points around the NY Harbor. To get the commodities to the New Jersey shoreline; many railroads, their locomotives themselves powered by steam, have built a vast network of tracks radiating towards the New York area
.

   In the pre-float bridge days, freight had to be manually transferred at the docks and wharves from newly arrived trains to barges and lighters (a lighter is essentially a barge with a enclosed structure on it, similar in design to a one room warehouse). Of the lighters that carried products that need to be kept chilled, (i.e.: milk, meat, fruits and vegetables), these lighters were insulated (usually with double walls filled with sawdust) and were equipped with roof hatches for the loading of ice to be carried on board.

   This was a time consuming and back breaking method, of having to unload a freight car on the dock, load it onto a lighter or barge, transport the lighter cross-harbor out of New Jersey, then unload it. Then repeat the process again for the trip back. It also required vast labor pools.

   There had to be a better way...

.

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Development of Carfloat Transfer Bridges in New York Harbor

.

   The following link will take you to the comprehensive history of the development of the carfloat transfer bridge in New York Harbor. This page includes all illustrations and information of float bridges previous located here, as well the addition of separate apron history as published in the 1905 Railway Age, the Mallery and French patent filings, and scans of James B. French's 1917 book "Development of the Car Float Transfer Bridges in New York Harbor"

   Naturally, an undertaking of this scope may have encountered unintentional omissions or erroneous data. Please direct all questions, corrections, and suggestions to bedt14@aol.com.

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DEVELOPMENT OF CAR FLOAT TRANSFER BRIDGES IN NEW YORK HARBOR

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Comprehensive List of Float Bridges throughout New York Harbor
including New Jersey

.

   The following link will take you to a comprehensive list of all known float bridges that existed from 1866 to present, and that were located throughout New York Harbor and all adjoining estuaries, basins and rivers including but not limited to: Hudson / North River, Harlem River, East River, Upper New York Bay, Morris Canal, Wallabout Basin, Gowanus Bay and the Arthur Kill.

   This table was compiled by both Paul Strubeck & myself; with the cooperation of Tom Flagg and Ben Schaefer and others. This comprehensive table of all float bridges was born out of the previous list located here of surviving float bridges in the New York Harbor. Therefore it is only fitting that those surviving float bridges (whether they be derelict, in service or not yet placed in service) are listed in the comprehensive list and all data (where known) for all float bridges is now listed.

   Naturally, an undertaking of this scope may have encountered unintentional omissions or erroneous data. Please direct all questions, corrections, and suggestions to bedt14@aol.com.

.

COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF FLOAT BRIDGES LOCATED THROUGHOUT NEW YORK HARBOR
INCLUDING NEW JERSEY

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Float Bridge Appliances

   The illustration below shows the appliances found on almost all pontoon type float bridges used throughout New York Harbor. Clicking on the illustration below will bring you to close up off the appliances. Use the back arrow on your web browser to return you here.

   Please take note that the only appliance not shown is the float bridge jack and a-frame. The reason for this is that this component has not been used in day to day float bridge operations for the last 20 years. Matter of fact, by referencing current images of New York New Jersey Rail float bridge operations in Brooklyn, the float bridge jack is not even mounted on the Bush Terminal float bridge in service.

   This appliance, if  it were to have been included in the diagram below, would have been located between the center two toggles with the hydraulic piston overhanging from the edge of the float bridge.

DIAGRAM NOT TO SCALE

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Carfloat Mooring & Float Bridge Pinning Procedures

..This chapter, once the reader has familiarized themselves with the components of a floatbridge; is to give the reader an understanding of the procedures involved in mooring and pinning a carfloat to a float bridge.

Pontoon Float Bridges

  To moor carfloats at pontoon type float bridges; the following procedure applies:

  1.  Tugboat approaches float bridge with carfloat, and holds it in position for mooring;

  2.  Four hawser lines attached to front mooring cleats (two on each side) of carfloat and are tightened up via winch wheels to bring carfloat into initial
         alignment. The winch wheels turns the winch drum (which holds the hawser line) via a gear reduction / torque multiplier system;  

  3.  Locomotive slowly proceeds onto right track (facing water) of float bridge to weigh it down into the water; and to match height of float bridge with deck of carfloat;

  4.  The right toggle bars are slid into carfloat receptacles and fastened with the toggle block;

  5.  Hawser lines would be tightened again via winch wheels, and mooring lines from carfloat side cleats are attached to finger pier (if applicable);

  6.  Locomotive reverses and backs off float bridge, switches to left track, and proceeds forward on float bridge left track until left side toggle bars
         are aligned with carfloat toggle receptacles;

  7.  The left toggles (pins) are slid into carfloat receptacles and fastened with the chock;

  8.  Hawser lines are tightened again;

  9.  Hand jacks on the rails on the float bridge would be turned to adjust the horizontal alignment of the rails on the float bridge to match with rails on carfloat;

  10.  Locomotive now "drills" (unloads cars from carfloat). For the procedure on this operation, please proceed to the next chapter below:
     "Carfloat Unloading Procedures"

Overhead Suspension Electrically Operated Transfer Bridges

   Carfloat mooring and pinning procedures were a little different at electrically operated (separate apron & contained apron) type float bridges; as those float bridges has electric winches for drawing in the carfloat tight against the float bridge:

  1.  Tugboat brings carfloat in, and the float bridge is raised or lowered by bridgeman in control cabin to bring it into correct height alignment with
          carfloat.

  2.  Hawser lines from power winch attached to front mooring cleats on each side of carfloat.

  3.  Carfloat would be drawn in tight to float bridge.

  4.  All toggles (pins) would be slid into carfloat receptacles and chocked in.

  5.  Secondary hawser lines from manually powered winch wheels added and tightened.

  6.  Hawser lines from carfloat side cleats attached to "finger piers" on both sides of carfloats.

  7.  Hand jacks on the rails on the float bridge would be turned to adjust the horizontal alignment of the rails on the float bridge to match with rails on
         carfloat;

  8. Locomotive now "drills" (unloads cars from carfloat). For the procedure on this operation, please proceed to the next chapter below:
     "Carfloat Unloading Procedures"

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Carfloat Unloading a/k/a "Drilling" Procedures

Please note:

  1. Train crews involved in carfloat operations refer to the tracks on a carfloat as north, south and middle.
    .

    However due to differing orientations of the carfloat depending on location (with a train crewman facing the carfloat from land) i.e.:

    .

     - At New Jersey locations, the bow of the carfloat points west, making the left track the north track.
     - At Manhattan or Brooklyn locations the bow of the carfloat points east, making the left track the south track.

    .

    Therefore, for reasons of clarity; the diagram below refers to the carfloat track orientation as starboard, center and port;
    which would remain constant regardless of direction or orientation.

    .

  2. The procedure illustrated & described below is for normal freight car unloading / loading. The loading or unloading of
    oversize or heavy loads (including multiple or road locomotives) would require a modified procedure.

    .

  3. Most switching locomotives (both steam and diesel) could go onto the float bridge and/or ride the carfloats as they did not
    weigh "much" at 64 tons (steam) and up to 125 tons +/- (diesel) respec
    tively. When a locomotive was needed to ride a carfloat,
    the outer tracks would be loaded first, and the center track freight cars loaded last, with the locomotive being the last to load.

    .

  4. Use of dedicated idler or reacher car is not shown in below diagram as idler/reacher use was practiced by some
    but not all railroads, and as any freight car could be used as an idler/reacher.

  1. Locomotive is inched forward onto float bridge to bring it into same height as carfloat. Carfloat is secured to float bridge using method and appliances outlined in above
       chapter. Locomotive then couples up to cut of cars on starboard side track.

  2. Locomotive pulls cut of cars on starboard side track half way off the carfloat and onto the float bridge lead; leaving part of the cut of cars still on
       float bridge and carfloat;

  3. The locomotive uncouples from starboard side cut of cars, and locomotive continues past float bridge lead turnout. Turnout is thrown and aligned for port side track.

  4. Locomotive heads forward onto port side carfloat track, and couples up to cut of cars on port side track.

  5. Locomotive reverses direction, and pulls entire cut of cars off of port side track of carfloat and past float bridge lead turnout; and float bridge lead turnout is thrown and aligned for starboard side track.

  6. Locomotive proceeds forward pushing port side cut of cars and couples up to starboard side cut of cars.

  7. Locomotive reverses direction and pulls combined port and starboard side cuts of cars off carfloat to clear the turnout on float bridge for carfloat center track, and points of center track turnout are thrown and aligned for center track;

  8. Locomotive pushes combined port and starboard of cars onto carfloat, coupling up to string of cars on the center track of carfloat.

  9. Locomotive reverses direction, and pulls entire cut of cars (combined port starboard and center track cuts of cars) into the yard.

    Carfloat is now unloaded. To load carfloat, reverse procedure.

Would you like to see this operation in real time? Visit my videos on YouTube at:
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Kaufman Act / Anti-Smoke Legislation of New York State - 1925
(Enter the diesel-electric locomotive...)

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   The Kaufman Electrification Act of 1923, ratified by the New York State Assembly, mandated that all railroads located in the City of New York City be electrified by January 1, 1926. The bill was sponsored by recently elected Assemblyman Victor R. Kaufman (R) (hence it being called the Kaufman Act) and signed by Governor Alfred Emanuel Smith (D) on June 2, 1923. News of this act was published in the June 5, 1923 issue of the New York Times. As a result of this act, all railroads (freight as well as passenger railroads) operating in New York City would face a significant change pertaining to their operations with the passing of the State of New York's "Kaufman Act".

   Actually, the State of New York had already enacted legislation as early as 1903 prohibiting the operation of steam locomotives on Manhattan Island south of the Harlem River after June 30, 1908. This legislation was in response to the January 8, 1902 wreck in the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad's Park Avenue Tunnel, leading to and from Grand Central Station. In this incident, smoke had obscured the view of an engineer and he collided with another train. As a result, fifteen passengers were killed and two score (forty) of people were injured.

   Even though this legislation was enacted, clearly exemptions had been made as there are several photographs within this website showing several of the trunkline railroads operating steam locomotives in Manhattan right up through the mid 1920's (i.e.: Erie RR at West 28th Street, New York Central RR along Tenth and Eleventh Avenues).
.

   By way of this new 1923 legislation however, the State of New York attempted to force the railroads to electrify their lines. This new legislation required that:

"No railroad or part thereof operating within the limits of the city
of New York or within the limits of an adjoining city shall on or after January 1, 1926, use any motive power in its operation within
these cities except electricity, to be generated, transmitted and
used in said operation in a manner to be approved by the Public Service Commission."

   As some of these railroads in the list at below right are covered in this website, I felt it necessary to include a "universal" explanation of the Kaufman Act that is applicable to all.

   Following this legislation, the Kaufman Act (as this legislation was to be known as) banned steam locomotives from New York City because of severe pollution problems.


Brooklyn Daily Eagle - March 12, 1925

   .
   The response to this law was to electrify high-traffic rail lines. However, electrification was uneconomical to apply to low traffic areas, freight terminals and small industrial concerns.

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   Naturally, this legislation did not sit well with many of the railroads in the New York City area, and several railroads (trunk line and independent alike) filed an appeal.

   The Kaufman Act would, without any doubt; incur serious financial hardships on many of the independent contract terminals operating in New York City.

Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal;
Bush Terminal;
New York Dock;
Degnon Terminal;
New York, New Haven & Hartford;
New York Central; and

Staten Island Rapid Transit
.

   One would only need to calculate the total cost of replacing all eleven of Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal's steam locomotives (those in use in 1925 and all at the same time) with electric locomotives plus having to string trolley wire or catenary to power those electric locomotives. Quite simply, here is where "sticker shock" sets in.

    The Long Island Rail Road estimated it was going to cost between 25 and 40 million dollars for them to comply with the Kaufman Law. This figure translates to 306 to 490 million in 2009 dollars. Almost half a billion dollars!

    But the true loser however, is really the small one or two locomotive terminal like Degnon, which would most likely just "fold up" rather than attempting to electrify.

   Taking into consideration that research into gas / diesel locomotive technology had yet to be perfected, which is why the Kaufman Act specified "electric". Other than steam there was no real alternative other than electric.


Brooklyn Daily Eagle - December 31, 1925

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Enter the Oil (Diesel) - Electric Locomotive

   In response to the Kaufman Act, several railroads operating in the New York City area approached Ingersoll-Rand to build a prototype diesel-powered switching locomotive. Actually, both General Electric and Ingersoll-Rand had been experimenting separately with internal combustion powered locomotives for some time. But the looming compliance date of the Kaufman Act really spurred on advances with this form of locomotive.

   This is not to say Baldwin Locomotive Works was ignoring this situation either. They too developed a diesel electric locomotive, however their design was more conducive of road service. Therefore, the Ingersoll-Rand was the logical choice for the various offline contract terminals in New York City. 

   Ironically, the Jay Street Connecting Railroad, an offline rail-marine terminal in Brooklyn; had already hosted a diesel-electric locomotive prototype built by General Electric in 1918. But unfortunately this design was not successful due in most part to electrical control issues.

   This prototype GE-IR model (X3-1) is known by it's construction number: #8835; was fitted with an inline six cylinder (10" x 12" cylinders) diesel engine constructed by Ingersoll-Rand utilizing the Price-Rathbun design and solid injectors.  This engine in turn powering an electrical generator designed by General Electric. This in turn supplied electricity to traction motors with voltage and current being regulated using controls designed a few year prior by Hermann Lemp of General Electric. The carbody was a left over, laying around at General Electric's Erie, PA facility.

   Sam Berliner, has authored an extremely knowledgeable (and enjoyable) website containing an in-depth history on the development of the oil-electric locomotive, including the resulting commercial models sold. This website contains images, rosters, and specifications thereof. I strongly recommend this website be visited at: ALCO / GE / IR Boxcabs. Further info may also be ascertained from the December 1970 issue of Trains magazine.

   Sam also had this to add and it should be noted:

 "By the way, CNJ #1000 (and the other early diesel electrics) were NOT called "diesel-electric" (not then, anyway); they were referred to as "oil-electric".
The reason for this being Rudolph Diesel was a German and anti-German sentiment following World War I was still running very high in the early Twenties;
so Ingersoll-Rand called their compression ignition engines "oil engines".


Ingersoll-Rand / General Electric Demonstrator #8835 - December 17, 1923
image courtesy of S. Berliner, III

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. #8835 would be "unveiled" on February 28, 1924 to the representatives of the railroads showing interest in a diesel locomotive: Baltimore & Ohio, Pennsylvania, Boston & Maine, New York Central, Reading & Lehigh Valley. While the men were impressed, they remained unconvinced of the design which had not seen day to day service. So, beginning in June 1924, and for the next thirteen months, the unit went through rigorous (and to some extent, abusive) testing on ten different railroads and three industries (to which the locomotive had been leased on a trial basis). #8835 would come to spend quite a bit of time operating on the West Side of Manhattan along Tenth and Eleventh Avenues for the New York Central Railroad:


Ingersoll-Rand / General Electric Demonstrator #8835 - sometime between June 9 and August 23, 1924 - 10th Avenue, Manhattan, NY
from Diesel Spotters Guide, Jerry Pinkepank / Kalmbach Publishing

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   According to Diesel Spotters Guide, by Jerry Pinkepank, Kalmbach Publishing; the locomotive was broken in at the Ingersoll-Rand plant at Phillipsburg, NJ. The breakdown of hours of service per railroad are as follows. Details of the service performed are from Sam Berliner's website on ALCO / GE / IR Boxcabs.

railroad conducting test hours of service dates of service remarks
New York Central 833 6/9/1924
8/23/1924.
Placed in yard switching service (New York City West Side Yards) on July 19th for a daily recording of
performance data. In one test,  this unit was operated 24 hours per day (almost continuously),
handling 3 shifts daily from 7/24 to 8/7. Inspection of the locomotive could only occur during crew changes.
On 8/14 a "Tonnage Test" was conducted. #8835 pulled "93 loaded freight cars on level track" for 36 minutes.
1, 2
Note: The Ingersoll-Rand record does not indicate what these loads consisted of or total tonnage pulled.
Baltimore & Ohio 81 8/25/1924
9/4/1924
A local freight service test was conducted on 8/29 to record performance data.
Central Railroad of
New Jersey:
35 9/5/1924
9/9/1924
A light yard drilling test was conducted during this period to record performance data.
Ingersoll-Rand   9/12/1924 Returned to Ingersoll-Rand for a complete inspection. Measurements were taken of various parts and
compared with the first full inspection record taken on February 12, 1924. No deficiencies noted, 
no parts needed replacing. Wear was so insignificant that it doesn't bear mentioning.
After the wrist pin, crank pin, and main bearings were set up to standard clearances
the engine was closed exactly as it was taken apart and returned to service.
3
New York, New Haven & Hartford 271 9/22/1924
11/4/1924
Yard switching service tests were conducted during this period to record performance data.
Union Freight 40 11/6/1924
11/8/1924
Tested in the Boston, MA area.
Boston & Maine 132 11/10/1924
11/20/1924
Various testing operations were conducted by this railroad.
Long Island: 362.5 11/28/1924
2/16/1925
Yard switching service tests were conducted 12/7/24 to record performance data.
Second period of demonstration trials was begun in which it is reported that an
additional 234 hours of testing was concluded on 2/16/25.
Bethlehem Steel 9   After LIRR - Tested for 9 hours on the Philadelphia, Bethlehem & New England RR.
passenger service test 11 2/27/1925
2/28/1925
Two passenger coaches were pulled between Jersey City, NJ and Harrisburg, PA
(approximately 175 miles)
in a little over 11 hours to record performance data.

Reading

207 2/27/1925(?) 3/17/1925 Received at the end of February 1925 and beginning on 3/4 participated in yard switching
service tests to record performance.
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 120 3/23/1925
3/28/1925
Yard switching service tests were conducted to record performance.
Hoboken Manufacturers 26 3/31/1925
4/2/1925
Various testing operations were conducted by this railroad.
New Jersey Zinc
(Palmerton, PA)
79   Tested on the Chestnut Ridge Railway.
Alan Wood Iron & Steel
(Conshohocken, PA)
32 7/9/1925
7/11/1925
Steel plant yard service tests were conducted to record performance data in conjunction
with the Upper Merion & Plymouth RR.

   

   Three notable accomplishments took place during this trial phase:
.

1
  On August 14, 1924; during one of many tests by the New York Central in Manhattan; #8835 started and pulled a train of 93 cars on level track. This is not a bad
    accomplishment considering you only had 300 horsepower to work with!

2   It also "partook" of a tug of war with a Shay type locomotive of New York Central's, in which it won that battle due to smoother torque of the electric drive and greater coefficient
    of friction (and a little overzealousness on the part of the Shay's engineer, who got the Shay's wheel's slipping). Needless to say, the "Central's" men we very impressed.

3   Midpoint through its so-far successful testing, (in which it operated for seven months in almost continuous use), the locomotive was returned to Ingersoll-Rand. The engine was
    disassembled for examination and here it was seen that wear and tear was extremely minimal: .0005 inch on cylinders and .0025 on main bearings. And this from a relatively
    unproven design! The engine was subsequently reassembled without replacing, repairing or modifying a single component and returned to service.

   Without any room for doubt, it was clear that the prototype design of this locomotive proved to be durable, efficient, easy to maintain and easy to operate. It was now that Ingersoll-Rand felt secure that it was time for commercial production of the design. This resulted in the production of the American Locomotive / General Electric / Ingersoll-Rand  (a/k/a "AGEIR") 60 ton 300 hp boxcab locomotive, with Ingersoll-Rand supplying the power plant, General Electric furnishing the electrical components and American Locomotive supplying the carbodies.

   The first AGEIR unit constructed for sale was a  Model B3-1: "B" denoting boxcab, "3" denoting horsepower (in hundreds) and "1" denoting body style.

   This first production locomotive was purchased by and delivered to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Bronx Terminal in October 1925 and was numbered 1000 by the CRRNJ. This highly successful Ingersoll-Rand locomotive went on to further demonstrate that diesel-electric locomotives could in fact provide many of the benefits of an electric locomotive without the cost of the railroad in having to install overhead trolley wire / catenary to power that locomotive, which was a significant expense of electrification.


Central Railroad of New Jersey  #1000 at Bronx Terminal, Bronx, NY - November 2, 1925
authors collection

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   So, following the success of the AGEIR locomotive at Bronx Terminal; several railroads ordered identical models for use at their offline terminals in the New York area:
.

  • Erie Railroad would purchase two: one for use at their Harlem Station in the Bronx and one for their West 28th Street Freight Station in Manhattan;
    (to be numbered 20 & 19)

  • Lehigh Valley would purchase one for use at their West 27th Street Freight Station in Manhattan;
    (to be numbered #100)

  • Baltimore & Ohio would purchase one for use at their West 26th Street Freight Yard in Manhattan;
    (to be numbered 1 and subsequently renumbered 195 and 8000); and

  • Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad would also purchase two: one locomotive for their 25th Street Terminal in Brooklyn (numbered 3001) and one for their Harlem Transfer facility in the Bronx (ordered as DLW #3002 but delivered Harlem Transfer #2).
    .

Meanwhile, back at the ranch... the Kaufman Act "battle" continues...
.

   Returning to the Kaufman Act; the Long Island, New York Central, New York, New Haven & Hartford, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, New York Dock, Degnon Terminal, and Staten Island Rapid Transit were still maintaining that the law was unjust and were successful in obtaining temporary injunctions.

   The Kaufman Law would eventually be held as unconstitutional as evidenced by the Brooklyn Daily Eagle September 10, 1926 article seen at far right. The following railroads: Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, New York Dock, Degnon Terminal and Staten Island Rapid Transit, were awarded preliminary injunctions against the State of New York as stated by the Brooklyn Daily Eagle article.

   The Kaufman Act was subsequently amended in 1926 to extend the deadline five more years, to 1931. This extension was partially made in consideration of the fact that diesel-electric locomotive technology (as discussed above) was now past the experimental and prototypical phase and had entered successful railroad applications.

    As diesel-electric locomotives were deemed to be in compliance with the intent of the legislation, the Kaufman Act was further amended to include diesel locomotives as an option to replace steam locomotives.


Brooklyn Daily Eagle
March 27, 1926


Brooklyn Daily Eagle
September 10, 1926

   This amendment allowed a second "power" option for the railroads to use in order to comply with the law, and obviously of which some railroads took this route.

   Others did not: the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad would electrify their Staten Island Railway, Degnon Terminal would simply sell out their operation to the Long Island Rail Road in September 1928, with the Long Island Rail Road both electrifying and dieselizing their routes within Brooklyn and Queens, and Bush Terminal would "dieselize" in 1931 with their purchase of seven H3 high hood models from Ingersoll-Rand.

   Also, if I understand correctly; the Kaufman Act was further amended to consider those railroads that were too small to consider electrification, but I cannot locate either a newspaper article or legal document to reflect this amendment. Apparently some form of allowances or exemptions were proposed and adopted, as both the New York Dock Railway and Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal operated steam locomotives through 1951 and 1963 respectively.

   What has not been learned as yet, is under what specific allowances / exemptions the New York Dock and Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal operated their steam locomotives. One possible hypothesis which is unconfirmed at this time; is that about the early to mid 1930's the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal converted their locomotives from coal fired to oil fired, using Bunker-C oil. As evidenced by many of the photographs of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal steam locomotives, they burned rather "clean" with little evidence of heavy smoke typical of a coal fired locomotive. I believe this is how the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal complied (circumvented?) with the Kaufman Act.

   Referencing several photos of New York Dock steam locomotives show tall enclosed style oil bunkers on the rear of the locomotives post-1931, while others show short open coal style bunkers, and even piles of coal and coal bins on the docks (which may have been for indoor stove use, but cannot be discounted for powering the locomotives as yet). New York Dock would continue to operate their steam locomotives as well, but eventually "dieselized" in 1951 with their purchase of five General Electric 44 ton centercab switchers, leaving only the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal to continue to operate steam powered locomotives until 1963; when they too would dieselize with their initial purchase of four (eventually to add two more, making a total of six) used American Locomotive Company model S1 switchers.

   As a footnote, I have to add that researching the Kaufman Act was no quick and simple task. When steam locomotives faded into obscurity and diesel-electric locomotives became the standard throughout the 1940s and 1950's, details about the Kaufman Act also faded into obscurity. I still have not been able to locate the original legislation. It also appears to date at the time of this writing, that no railroad historian had yet assembled a definitive history of the Kaufman Act (with the exception of a quick blurb or paragraph), and both the negative and positive repercussions of the Kaufman Act upon the railroad industry. That is until now.

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Firsts, Lasts & Onlys

   The various terminals (online & offline) in the New York Area would become the location for many "firsts" of railroading that would occur, not to mention "lasts" and "onlys".

   The following table is a compilation of those occurrences or events. Please feel free to submit others or corrections. Criteria is that the event or occurrence pertain to an offline terminal or industrial railroad in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, Bronx or Manhattan.

railroad 

location

description

date

Central RR of New Jersey New Jersey
(exact location ?)
First pontoon float bridge in New York Harbor 1866
Palmer's Dock Brooklyn First offline terminal and floatbridge operation located in Brooklyn.
First float bridge operation east of Manhattan as well.
1876
Pennsylvania New Jersey
(Harsimus Cove)
First separate apron transfer bridge. 1888
Harlem Transfer Bronx First circular freight house and concentric trackage. 1898
Long Island Queens
(L.I.C.)
First swiveling head block (Mallery design) transfer bridge. 1904
Bush Terminal Brooklyn First offline terminal to combine terminal operations, overseas shipping
and manufacturing facilities on one property.
1905
New York Central Manhattan
(W. 69th St)
First overhead suspension contained apron transfer bridge (French design)
placed in service.
1911
Jay Street Terminal Brooklyn First diesel electric locomotive
#4 (General Electric)
1918
Central RR of New Jersey Bronx First successful commercially produced diesel electric locomotive
#1000 (American Locomotive Co / General Electric / Ingersoll-Rand)
1925
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Brooklyn
(Wallabout)
Wallabout Terminal is only offline terminal to utilize overhead catenary power
for complete operation including locomotive operation on float bridge.
1926
(may predate this)
Bush Terminal Brooklyn First independent offline terminal to completely dieselize railroad operations. 1931
Lehigh Valley Manhattan
(W. 27 St.)
First building to house various manufacturing and commercial tenants and to offer
enclosed rail service with loading / unloading and distribution services (Starrett - Lehigh)
1932
Baltimore & Ohio Manhattan
(W. 26 St.)
Oldest steam locomotive in regular operation for a Class I Railroad
#316 was originally built in August 1865.
1937
Jay Street Terminal Brooklyn Only known composite steel plate girder & steel truss float bridge. ca. 1940 - 1959
Baltimore & Ohio Manhattan
(West 26th St.)
Last wood Howe Truss float bridge constructed new for use. 1954
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Brooklyn Last operation of steam powered locomotives concludes for daily freight use. 1963
Lehigh Valley &
Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal
Brooklyn First & only usage of centerpipe carfloat for unloading
of bulk powder / grain material for Schaefer Brewery.
1960's - 1974
New York New Jersey Rail Brooklyn, NY/
Greenville, NJ
Last carfloating operation in New York.
(between Greenville, NJ & Bush Terminal Brooklyn, NY)
current

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Railroad Operated Pier Stations & Inland Freight Stations

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   In all honesty, I never intended to create pages on the Pier Stations or Inland Freight Stations. My sole page on these facilities regarded those Pier Stations located in Wallabout Basin in Brooklyn. However, after expanding my research into the Class 1 offline terminals in Manhattan, images began to creep into my collection.

   Therefore as of April 2009, you will now find a page on pier station facilities located in Manhattan. After all, it was only fitting I refer to those pier stations in Manhattan since I squirrelled away several images of those pier stations that I locating in the various archives.

   It must also be remembered, that almost any pier could receive freight via carfloat. As such, a great majority of piers on West side of Manhattan handled freight in some way or another, so I had to differentiate between the railroad operated piers and those of the many shipping lines in Manhattan as well.

   Also, most of the fruit and produce wholesalers had one or more piers on the Hudson and / or East Rivers, therefore station carfloats could be found next to a pier that was not a railroad operated pier station and have not been included. In any event, pier stations on the Hudson and East Rivers, were very ubiquitous to say the least and were not often photographed. Therefore even the small amount of photos I have acquired, should provide some enjoyment to the interested reader.

   It was then in doing some quick research on those pier stations (for pier dimensions), that I learned the railroads had "inland" freight stations as well. These were nothing more than multi-story warehouses located some blocks from either the pier stations or offline terminals. Photos of these are what I consider "rarest of the rare". There were not many of these inland freight stations and both data and images are scarce, so I have included these as well on the page.

   In regards to this topic, one person stands out above the rest a unique contributor: Mr. Joseph DeMay. Joe is a historian of piers and wharves in the New York Harbor area and is constantly acquiring images of those piers and wharves to which some are over 100 years old. Special thanks goes to Joe for sharing his collection of images of pier stations with us.

   The following link will take you to the page showcasing the collection of images taken throughout New York Harbor of Railroad Operated Pier Stations and Inland Freight Stations that were located in Manhattan:
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RAILROAD OPERATED PIER STATIONS & INLAND FREIGHT STATIONS OF MANHATTAN

   The following link pertains to the only documented railroad operated pier stations in Brooklyn. This was the wallabout Union Freight / Pier Station in Brooklyn, NY and of which a bit of research I have compiled a bit of research on:

WALLABOUT UNION FREIGHT STATION OF BROOKLYN
(PRR, NYC / WS / NYO&W, LV, B&O, CRRNJ)

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Miscellaneous Freight Railroad Images of New York City
(historical & present day)

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   This page is dedicated to images of Freight Railroad Operations in the City of New York, that do not specifically apply to my areas of interest, but are of significant importance to be archived.

   While most are images of the New York Central Railroad street operations in Manhattan prior to the construction of the "High Line", there are also present day images of the freight operations at the New York Container Terminal in Port Ivory, Staten Island. This is significant due to the fact that it incorporates use of a historical railroad landmark, the Arthur Kill Vertical Lift Bridge.

   Also included are a few images of the current operator of Bush Terminal in Brooklyn and Greenville, NJ; that being New York New Jersey Rail.

MISCELLANEOUS FREIGHT RAILROAD IMAGES OF NEW YORK CITY
(H
ISTORICAL & MODERN ERA)

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List of Miscellaneous Locomotives, Owners & Operators
in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island & the Bronx

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   The following is a compilation of firms listed in the various builders records I have acquired, that were located in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and the Bronx, and which are shown to have received, owned or operated locomotives.

   In several circumstances, I have come across firms shown on property tax maps (Bromley, E. Belcher Hyde) that show trackage, but I could not find an entry for a locomotive for this firm. A link to an image of that property map is listed under those entries.

   It should be noted, that with the industrial railroads that I have listed above, they had some significant data or history records in one form or another that I have been able to compile, and this information made it feasible to create a separate page on that company. The owners listed below however, have no such recorded history of operations, and so until such a history is found, they are relegated to a simple list.

   Frankly, there are dozens if not hundreds of locomotives listed in the builders records for firms in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island, NY; and I have only located one entry for the Bronx. When I first started this venture, it was brought to my attention that some of those locomotives may have indeed operated in Brooklyn and / or Queens, while others may have simply been registered to an owner or company that was located in Brooklyn or Queens, but the locomotive may have actually been used at another location not in the City of New York.

   There were also many machinery equipment suppliers and brokers located in Brooklyn (and Queens, Manhattan, etc), so some of those locomotives were actually purchased by one of these brokers and resold, i.e: to a plantation railroad in South America, a quarry railroad in Manitoba, etc. Those locomotives cleared marked for export or lease in the builders records have been excluded altogether.

   However, one factor to consider in regards to several contracting and construction firms listed below, these firms are also found to be named or seen in photographic records of some of the various New York City subway system construction contracts. Therefore it is a possibility that the locomotives were used in some capacity or another to excavate new tunnel construction and / or existing tunnel expansion projects throughout the early half of the Twentieth Century.

   One of the things I took note of when reviewing the expanded this list below (which now includes the locomotive models and dates of acquisition), is that the majority of dates of acquisition are in the 1920's, prior to the Great Depression, with extremely few entries dated afterwards. Whether there is any real correlation between the fall off of locomotive purchases and the stock market crash of 1929, remains unknown.

   For now, here is a list of firms that are listed in the builders records as being in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island and show as to having received locomotives, or in some cases a property tax (Belcher - Hyde, Bromley), or fire insurance (Sanborn) map shows trackage for that firm. I have listed the pertinent data for each locomotive where known.

   Please note, this list does not include the recipients of steam or other locomotives for passenger use.

firm location manufacturer model c/n gauge date acquired
(u) = used
date sold (s)
returned (r)
transferred (t)
scrapped (x)
note
American Brick Annadale, Staten Island Plymouth 7T BL2 1188 36" 3/14/1922    
American Linoleum Linoleumville (Travis)
Staten Island

as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]
Awixa Corp. Long Island City Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
6T MO
6T MO
7T MO
7T MO
7T MO
11402
11403
11616
11689
11690
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
8/1922
8/1922
9/1923
2/1924
2/1924
(r)

(s) 12/1926

6/1925
 
Barber Asphalt Paving Long Island City Porter
Porter
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
2358
2430
30"
30"
4/1901
10/1901
   
E. W. Bliss (Munitions) Co Brooklyn Whitcomb 45DE27A 60111 std. 1/1942 (u) (s)  
Campbell Motor Co. Brooklyn Brookville 4 WGM B1  341 24"  3/11/1924       
P. J. Carlin Construction Brooklyn Whitcomb 7T MO 12227 36" 7/1926    
Carleton Company Brooklyn Whitcomb 6T ESB 1990 36" 1/1929    
Con Edison Staten Island EMD? SW _?_S          
Connor Brothers Contracting.. Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
6T MO
6T MO
6T MO
6T MO
7T CKU
7T CKU
7T CKU
1186
1187
1188
1189
12767
12768
12769
24"
24"
24"
24"
24"
24"
24"
8/1920 (u)
7/1928
7/1928
7/1928
10/1928
10/1928
10/1928
(r) 12/1928 (s) 3/1931
(r) 12/1928 (s) 3/1931
(r) 12/1928 (s) 3/1931
(r) 12/1928
12/1935
12/1935
12/1935
 
Cornell Contracting
Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
4T UF
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
12015
1992
1993
1994
1995
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
7/1925
7/1929
7/1929
7/1929
7/1929
  [d]
Corson Construction Brooklyn Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
4wGM FCR 4T
4wGM FCR 4T
4wGM FCR 4T
4wGM FCR 4T
957
959
983
985
36"
36"
36"
36"
11/10/1926
11/10/1926
12/28/1926
12/28/1926
   
Crawford Co. Brooklyn Porter 
Porter
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
5594
5595
24"
24"
8/1914
8/1914
   
Thomas Crimmins Contracting Long Island City Porter
Porter
Plymouth
Plymouth
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
AL 2
AL 2
4058
4059
608
609
36"
36"
36"
std.
4/1908
4/1908
6/5/1919
6/5/1919
   
Dolan Brick Great Kills, Staten Island Whitcomb 7T MO 12360 36" 12/1926 11/1937
Downey Shipbuilding Howland Hook,
Staten Isalnd

as seen on the 1924 Army Corp of Engineers Port Facilites Map

John Duncan Co. Brooklyn Whitcomb 7T MO 11760 36" 4/1925 (s) 7/1928 Synder Eng, NJ  
Emerson - Garden Electric Brooklyn Plymouth FLB 3404 std. 2/4/1930 (u)    
Empire Mills Brooklyn Porter 2-6-0 1148 3/1890    
Erickson Engineering Staten Island Plymouth 4½T RF 2 3624 std. 4/30/1931    
Faircroft Engineering Brooklyn Whitcomb
Plymouth
Plymouth
7T MO
5T FLB 2
5T FLB 2
11953
3671
3672
36"
std.
std.
3/1925
1/22/1932
1/22/1932
(s) 1/1934 to Erie Cnrtg NJ
(to A. Paino)
 
James Ferry & Sons Woodhaven, Queens Plymouth 3½T AL 2 685 30" 9/4/1919    
Fortis Contracting Jamaica Plymouth
Plymouth
5T FLB 2
5T FLB 2
3671
3672
std.
std.
(used)
(used)
   
Funch Edye Co. Brooklyn Porter 0-4-0(T?) 1989 24" 6/1899    
T. A. Gillespie Bay Ridge, Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
12T MO
12T MO
12T MO
12T MO
11707
11708
11709
11789
36"
36"
36"
36"
3/1924
4/1924
4/1924
7/1924
(s) 5/1928
(s) 11/1928
(s) 11/1928
(s) 2/1928
 
Gregg Company South Brooklyn Davenport  0-4-0T  872 40" 3/1909    
E. Harry Howard Little Neck, Queens Brookville
Brookville
4T 4wGM
4T 4wGM
715 24" 9/9/1925
Hubbard - Floyd Co. Brooklyn Whitcomb 7T MO 11953 std. 3/1925 (s) 7/1932 to Faircroft   
International Ultramarine Works.
(possibly S. I. Kaolin)
Port Mobil,
Staten Island

 as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

Arthur A. Johnson Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Plymouth
4T UF    
4T UF
4½T CS4
4½T CS4
4T CL3
12015
12016
12657
12686
1334
36"
36"
36"
36"
std.
7/1925
7/1925
7/1928
8/1928
2/23/1928 (u)
  .
.
[a]
[a]

.
James D. Leary Brooklyn Porter 0-4-0 (T?) 996   1/1889 (s) 4/1910  
McElroy & Kerwin Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
4½T CS4½
5T CS4
5T WVK
12425
12823
13109
std.
std.
std.
4/1927
2/1929
7/1931
   
Patrick McGovern Long Island City Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Plymouth
Plymouth
5T ESB
5T ESB
5T ESB
4T FL 2
4T FL 2
1528
1541
1542
2664
2665
24"
24"
24"
30"
30"
11/1917
12/1917
12/1917
7/5/1927
7/5/1927
   
James Marino Long Island City Davenport 0-4-0T 1021 36" 6/1910
Kreischer Brick Charleston, Staten Island

as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]
Mason & Hanger Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1990
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
12/1928
12/1928
1/1929
1/1929
1/1929
1/1929






(s) to Carleton Co.

[c]
[c]

[c]
[c]
[c]
Mideastern Contracting

Long Island City Plymouth
Plymouth
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
7T DLC 6
7T DLC 6
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
6T ESB
2315
2408
1970
1971
1996
1997
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
7/26/1928
8/24/1926
7/1928
7/1928
3/1929
3/1929
 



(s) to Danco Supply, Pa
(s) to Danco Supply, Pa


[b]
[b]
Milliken Brothers
(Steel Mill)
Staten Island Porter
Porter
Porter
Porter
Porter
Porter
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
3353
3354
3446
3447
3448
3576
std.
std.
36"
36"
std.
std.
1/1906
1/1906
5/1906
5/1906
5/1906
8/1906
(s) Montray Corp.




(s) Colonial Iron
 
Montrose Engineering Brooklyn Vulcan 8T Gas 3602 36" 9/1926    
National Sugar Refining of NJ Long Island City Whitcomb  2½ T ESB-SW 2013 36"  6/1929   [f]
Necaro & Co Brooklyn
.
.

Jamaica, Queens
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
3½T 4wGM
3½T 4wGM
4T 4wGM FCR
4T 4wGM FCR
4T 4wGM FCR
4T 4wGM FCR
4T 4wGM FCR
373
625
903
933
935
937
939
24"
24"
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
7/15/1924
3/12/1925
7/7/1926
10/16/1926
10/16/1926
10/16/1926
10/16/1926
   
New York & Boston Dye Wood Co Greenpoint, Brooklyn

as seen on 1916 E. Belcher Hyde Property Map

[pm]
Oakdale Construction /
Oakdale Contracting
Flushing, Queens Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
7T MO 
7T MO
7T MO
4T UF
4T UF
4T UF
11561
11562
11628
12015
12016
12017
36" 
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
6/1923
6/1923
9/1923
7/1925
7/1925
7/1925
(s) 1/1928
.
.

(s) 2/1920
(s) 5/1928
(s) 5/1928
 
Oakland Chemical Rossville, Staten Island

 as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]
O'Rourke Engineering & Contracting
(some units possibly shipped
to Sheldon, Iowa)

Long Island City Baldwin
ALCo
ALCo
ALCo
Baldwin
Baldwin
Whitcomb
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
0-4-0T
Mule 8HP
Mule 8HP
6T ESB-SM
22360
29661
29751
29752
27173
27174
2002
36"



24"
24"
24" 
6/1903
2/1904
6/1904
6/1904
12/1905
12/1905
4/1929
[e]
Angelo Paino Brooklyn Whitcomb 7T MO     3/1925 (s) 7/1932  
Paladino Engineering Brooklyn Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
Whitcomb
12T BJD
12T BJD
12T BJD
12T BJD
12097
12098
12099
12100
36"
36"
36"
36"
11/1925
11/1925
11/1925
11/1925
(r) 12/1928
(r) 5/1930
(r) 10/27
(s) 9/1927
 
Harry Perissi Far Rockaway, Queens Plymouth 4T CL2 2027 23½" 5/20/1925    
Carlo Petrillo Brooklyn Vulcan
Vulcan
Vulcan
4T Gas
4T Gas
4T Gas
3987
3989
3999
24"
24"
24"
6/1929
6/1929
6/1929
   
Pioneer Iron Works Brooklyn Porter 0-4-2T 774 30" 9/1886    
T. H. Reynolds Construction Brooklyn Plymouth 4T CL3
4T CL3
1334
1335
std.
std.
11/9/1922
11/9/1922
   
Richmond Brick Rossville, Staten Island

as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]
Riter - Coaley Mfg. Astoria Porter 0-4-0T 2956 36" 7/1904    
Robins Dry Dock & Repair Brooklyn Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
Brookville
8T 4wDM BMD UD-6
4w flatcar, 6' long
4w flatcar, 6' long
4w flatcar, 6' long
8T 4wDM BHA D00C
4w flatcar, 6' long
4w flatcar, 6' long
4w flatcar, 6' long
2648
2649
2650
2651
2697
2698
2699
2700
std.
std.
std.
std.
std.
std.
std.
std.
7/26/41
7/26/41
7/26/41
7/26/41
12/26/1941
12/26/1941
12/26/1941
12/26/1941
 
Rossville Brick Rossville, Staten Island

as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]
Charles F. Schmitt Brooklyn Whitcomb 3½T     11/1920    
Emmett B. Simpson Queens Plymouth 10T JLA 2 2799 36" 1/27/1928    
Slattery & Daino Astoria Vulcan
Vulcan
Vulcan
Vulcan
Vulcan
14T Gas
14T Gas
14T Gas
14T Gas
14T Gas
4035
4113
4114
4115
4126
36"
36"
36"
36"
36"
12/1930
10/1930
10/1930
10/1930
12/1930
   
Staten Island Kaolin

Charleston, Staten Island

 as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]
Henry Steers Bronx Baldwin 0-4-4T 5573 std. 4/1907 (u)    
Todd Erie Basin Dry Docks
(merged w/ Robins Dry Dock)
Brooklyn Brookville 4w flatcar 9' 8" long
40t capacity
2950 std. 11/24/43    
Wagner - Larsen Construction Brooklyn Whitcomb 5T WVK 12991  std. 12/1929    
Walsh Construction Long Island City Whitcomb
Whitcomb
25DE17 (23DE1?)
23DE1
60104
60118 
std.
std.
8/1941
8/1941
(s) 6/1945
John Weber Rossville, Staten Island

as seen on 1917 G. W. Bromley Property Map

[pm]

Locomotive Footnotes
[a] Sales records show this locomotive being shipped through the Brookyn Eastern District Terminal, Brooklyn, NY
[b] Sales records show this locomotive being shipped: Pidgeon St Station, Brooklyn, N Y
(the BEDT Pidgeon Street Station / Terminal was located in Queens, but the BEDT main offices was Kent Avenue, Brooklyn)
equipped with 20" wheels and Westinghouse V53 motor
[c] Mason - Hanger won the contract to bore and construct the Fulton Street subway tunnel under the East River for the 14th Street line.
These five 6 Ton ESB locomotives were shipped to the Fulton Terminal (of the New York Dock Railway), Brooklyn, NY.
Another five identical Whitcomb 6 Ton ESB locomotives were purchased as part of this contract (for a total of 10 locomotives) and delivered to
Pier 16 & 17, East River, New York, N Y; presumably so that boring could commence from both sides of the river and meet under the center of the riverbed.

equipped with 20" wheels and Westinghouse V53 motor
[d] trade in - $400 for Oakdale locomotive
equipped with 20" wheels and Westinghouse V53 motor
[e] equipped with 20" wheels and Westinghouse V53 motor
[f] this unit believed to have been brought in by BEDT and used in Jack Frost Sugar Refinery @ Pidgeon Street, Long Island City.
equipped with 18" wheels and Westinghouse V54 motor
[pm] trackage shown on property maps, no locomotive data found in builders records.

   ESB  = Electric Storage Battery

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Reference Number Chart

[1] . ALCo builders records ..... [21] . Trains Magazine, December 1973
[2] Baldwin builders records [23] Thomas R. Flagg; NY Harbor RR's
[3] H. K. Porter builders records [24] Jay Bendersky; Brooklyn's Waterfront Railways
[4] Pittsburgh builders records [25] Joseph A. Strapac, Industrial Electric Locomotive - GE
[5] Davenport builders records [30] data from photographer notes, D. Keller archives
[6] Plymouth builders records [31] Shore Line Trolley Museum website
[7] Birmingham Loco & Rail sales records [32] Colin Churchers Industrial Locomotives in Canada
[8] Vulcan Iron Works builders records [33] Robert Brendel compilation
[9] Rhode Island builders records [34] Gene Gerstner research
[10] Mack builders records [35] Donald Nute website
[11] BEDT records & sales prospectus [36] Illinois Railroad Museum website
[12] Lima builders records [37] Erie Lackawanna Historical Society website
[13] Whitcomb builders records [38] Ed Bommer research
[14] Schenectady builders records [40] Pennsy Power (1962)
[15] Diesel Shop (J. Komanesky) GE Roster [41] Pennsy Power II (1968)
[16]

North East Rails website & photo rosters

[42] Penn Central Bi-Annual (1973)
[17] B & O Power, Sagle / Staufer [44] Bill Russell website
[18] Critters, Dinkys & Centercabs [45] Sam Berliner, III website
[19] General Electric records via R. Lehmuth via J Taubeneck [55] Paul Strubeck research
[20] Trains Magazine, December 1970 [56] John Taubeneck research (builders records)

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Bibliography, Resources & Suggested Reading:

New York Times

  various issues and years
Brooklyn Eagle   various issues and years
Annual Reports of the Dept of Docks & Ferries CoNY   various years
Eads Johnson's Steam Vessels of the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific Coast   various years
Merchant Vessels of the United States   various years
The Pennsylvania Railroad: Its Organization, Construction & Mgmnt Dredge, James 1879 London Engineering
History of the Pennsylvania Railroad Watkins, J. Elfreth 1886
Engineering News: Freight Transfer Bridge 1890
Monthly Meeting, Western Railroad Club   September 1900
Engineering News: Standard Car Transfer Bridge NYC&HR RR December 1901
Transfer Floats, Ferries & Bridges Snow, J. P. 1901
New Transfer Bridge, Harsimus Cove, Jersey City Bensel, John, A. 1901
Passenger & Freight Terminal Transfer System at Harlem River, NY Chamberlain, W. E. 1904 AREA Proceedings
Notes of Track Construction and Maintenance Camp, W. M. 1904
Railway Age: The Greenville Yard & Transfer Arrangements of the PRR March 1904
Yards & Terminals and their Operation Droege, John A.   1906 McGraw - Hill?
Electrical Age: Electrically Operated Transfer Bridge September 1906
City of New York Department of Docks Atlas   1907
Engineering Record: The Weehawken Transfer Bridges of the WSRR February 1908
Track Mileage Book Brooklyn Rapid Transit January 1910
Engineering Record: The Oak Point Float Bridges on the East River March 1910
Documents of the Senate of the State of New York   1910
Engineering News: 69th St Car Transfer Bridge of NYC&HR RR December 1911
Freight Terminals and Trains Droege, John A. 1912 McGraw - Hill
Report of the Committee on Terminals & Transportation;   1913
Water Terminal & Transfer Facilities US Army Corp of Engineers 1913
The Floating Equipment of a Railroad duBosque, Francis L. 1915 Area
Railway Age Gazette   1915
Ports of the United States Jones, Grosvenor M. 1916
Municipal Year Book of the City of New York   1916
City Planning Nolen, John 1916
The Development of Car Float Transfer Bridges in New York Harbor 1917
Car Float Transfer Bridges in New York Harbor French, James B. January 1918
Joint Report with Comprehensive Plan & Recommendations NY NJ Pier Development Commission 1920
discussion after paper presentation on Carfloat Strength duBosque, Francis L. 1927 Society of Naval Architects
Working With The World Bush, Irving T. 1928 Doubleday Doran
Railway Age: Floating Operations Rendered More Efficient March 7, 1931
Railroad Magazine: Boxcar Navy Rohde, William L. September 1945 Popular Publications
Railroads of New York O'Connor, William L. 1949 Simmons - Boardman
Railroad Model Craftsman Magazine: CNJ Bronx Freight Terminal Crater, Warren B. February 1950 Carstens Publications
Erie Railroad Magazine internal publication February 1952
Railroad Magazine: Railroad Across The River Krampf, Melvin June 1952 Popular Publications
The Lackawanna: Harlem Station internal publication August 1956
Train Sheet, Vol.. XIV, No. 2 Railroadians of America 1959 Rairoadians of America
Locomotives & Cars since 1900 Lucas, Walter A. 1959 Simmons - Boardman
Railroad Magazine: Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Plowden, David April 1961 Popular Publications
Pennsy Power Staufer, Alvin F. 1962
The Twilight of Steam Locomotives Ziel, Ron 1963 Grosset & Dunlap
Trains Magazine: Railroad News Photos: BEDT #21 Jaeger, Alfred R. February 1963 Kalmbach Publications
Railroad Model Craftsman Magazine: Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Arcara, Roger September 1964 Carstens Publications
B & O Power Sagel, L. W. & Staufer, A. 1964 Standard Printing & Publishing
The Locomotives that Baldwin Built Westing, Frederick 1966
Diesel Spotters Guide Pinkepank, Jerry A. 1967
NYC Early Power Staufer, A.F.; Edson, W.D. & May, E.L. 1967 Staufer Publishing
Rail Freight of the Tri-State Region August 1967 Tri State Transportation Comm
Pennsy Power II Staufer, Alvin F. & Pennypacker, Bert 1968
Railroad Magazine: Hobby Club (BEDT #15) Reich, Sy June 1968 Popular Publications
Trains Magazine: South Appalachin #15 (ex BEDT) Huss, William J. October 1969 Kalmbach Publications
Trains Magazine: Ingersoll - Rand Hamley, David December 1970 Kalmbach Publications
The Second Diesel Spotters Guide Pinkepank, Jerry A. 1973
Penn Central System, Bi-Annual (First) Reid, Robert H. 1973 PC Railroader
The Boats We Rode Roberts, F. B. & Gillespie, J. 1974 Quadrant Press
Uptown Downtown, A Trip Through Time on New York's Subways Fischler, Stan 1976
Railroad Magazine: Information Booth Popular Publications May 1976 Popular Publications
Under the Sidewalks of New York Cudahy, Brian J. September 1979 Stephen Greene Press
The Port of New York: A History of the Rail & Terminal System... Condit, Carl 1980 Chicago University Press
Brooklyn's Waterfront Railways Bendersky, Jay 1988 Meatball Productions
Railroad Ferries of the Hudson Baxter, R. J.  & Adams, A. G. 1987 Lind
Over & Back Cudahy, Brian J. 1990 Fordham University
Railpace: The Cross Harbor Perelman, Carl  & Krattinger, John P. September 1992 Railpace
Bridge & Trestle Handbook Mallery, Paul 1992 Carstens Publishing
Keystone: V. 25 #1: Steam & Saltwater 1992 PRR H & TS
Keystone: V. 26 #2: Long Island City Float Yard Operations Kalis, Nicholas Summer 1993 PRR H & TS
Headlights Electric Railroaders Association May-June 1993 ERA
Classic Locomotives The Series - Vol.. 1: Alco Switchers Szachacz, Keith 1993 H & M Productions
Historic American Engineering Record
Greenville Transfer Bridges - HAER #NJ-49-A
National Park Service 1996 Lind Publications
Where Rail Meet the Sea Kreiger, Michael 1998 Metrobooks
Critters, Dinkys & Centercabs Reed, Jay 2000 Rio Hondo
The Diamond, Vol. 15, #1: Brooklyn 25th Street Erie Lackawanna Historical Society 2001 ELHS
New York Harbor Railroads in Color, Vol..1 & Vol.. 2 Flagg, Thomas R. 2000 & 2002 Morning Sun Publishing
Comprehensive Guide to Industrial Locomotives, 3rd Ed Reed, Jay 2002 Rio Hondo
The Diamond, Vol. 18, #4: Erie West 28th Street Lee, Vince & Flagg, Thomas 2004 ELHS
The New York Waterfront Bone, Kevin 2004 Monacaelli Press
Interurban Electric Locomotives from Baldwin - Westinghouse Strapac, Joseph A. 2004 Shade Tree Books
Interurban Electric Locomotives from General Electric Strapac, Joseph A. 2005 Shade Tree Books
Tugboats of New York Matteson, George 2005 New York University Press
Alco's HH Series Cupper, Sweetland & Withers 2006 Withers
The New York Connecting Railroad Sturm, Robert C. & Thom, William G. 2006 Sunrise Trail Chapter NRHS
The New York Central System (Images of Rail) Levy, Michael 2006 Arcadia Publishing
Jersey City's Hudson River Waterfront, Book 1 (PRR) Caldes, Charles P. 2009 Journal Square
Jersey City's Hudson River Waterfront, Book 2 (LV, CNJ, E, DLW, EL) Caldes, Charles P. 2010 Journal Square
Pennsylvania Railroad in Jersey City Caldes, Charles P. 2011 Journal Square
Transfer, various issues various authors   Rail Marine Information Group
Joseph Roborecky research   continuous
Fred Breimann research   continuous
Thomas Flagg research   continuous
John Teichmoeller research   continuous
Benjamin W. Schaeffer research   continuous
Erie Lackawanna Historical Society Jay Held  
Railroad Webpages Sam Berliner, III  
Long Island Rail Road website Steve Lynch  
Rail Marine Information Group John Teichmoeller  
NYCSubway.org - work cars & locomotives Dave Pirmann  
Arrt's Arrchives - NY Railroads Arthur Huneke  
TheJoeKorner - NYC Railroads Joseph Korman  
North East Rails Photo Archives Clint Chamberlin  
Don's Depot Don Ross  
Brooklyn Public Library    
Queens Public Library    
New York Public Library    
New York State Library    
Library of Congress    
Historic Map Works    
Historic Aerials    

Please note, I am not responsible for inaccuracies published by other sources.

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RETURN TO INDEX

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Special Thanks To:

   It has to be stated for the record, I cannot take sole credit for this website and contents.

   The associated pages within, would not be possible without the generous assistance and contributions from many avid railfans of the Offline Terminals, railroad and locomotive historians, descendants of owners or principals of the industrial railroads, as well as those representatives at repositories where information and photographs are stored.

   I have listed, in alphabetical order, those who have given their time and assistance in searching catalogs and locating and contributing images from their vast files:

Jim Arbuckle
descendant of John & Charles Arbuckle
(Jay Street Terminal founders) for John's birthdate

.

Dave Keller
for the use of his extensive photo archives,
photo developing of my negative collection and constant
answers & information on LIRR
.

Morgan Askew
for scanning and providing access to images in the
Kalmbach Memorial Library

.

John Komanesky
disposition info of Harlem Transfer #53 (and an
awesome website on GE EMD demonstrator locos!)

.

Sam Berliner, III
Atlas Terminal photo; Pennsylvania Long Island, Erie,
Lehigh Valley & New York Central Boxcab Info
.

Joseph D. Korman
for the use his South Brooklyn and Bush Terminal images
please visit his website at:
http://www.thejoekorner.com

Bob's Photo Archives
for use of his many photos
.

Stephen Lacey
post-New York Dock (Cuban) disposition info
of New York Dock 44 Tonner #53

. .

. John Bartelstone
for furnishing images from the Seatrain Shipbuilding
sales prospectus
.

Walt Lankenau
information on various locations, and
furnishing location on Harlem Transfer #53 image

.

Jim Blackstock /
Norfolk & Western Historical Society

for furnishing the picture of N&W #93 (BD&T #1)

Schuyler Larrabee
builders and disposition information of Erie locomotive #612

Edward F. Bommer
photo of Procter & Gamble #125, info and photo of
Pouch Termi
nal loco and most B&O historical info

.

John La Rue, Jr.
extensive contributions, information and research material for the
Double Ended Wreckers of New York Area

Robert Brendel
Bush Terminal and New York Dock locomotive information
.

Vince Lee
contributing material on the Bronx offline terminals,
his surviving Erie Harlem Statio
n gantry image.

.

Fred Breimann
Bush Terminal, New York Dock & NY Cross Harbor
loco engineer for extensive operational information
.

Steve Lynch
images, maps and research on Brooklyn Ash Removal &
G & R Packing located along the
LIRR Bay Ridge Branch, visit his website on the LIRR
.

Bob Caramore
for allowing me to procure his New York Area
offline terminal railroad slide collection
.

Bill McBride
photos and info on additional Procter & Gamble
Port Ivory locomotives

James Christie
General Manager, New York New Jersey Rail
for providing access to Greenville Yard and float bridges

.

Stojiny McCoy
history clarification of vessel "John A. McCormick"
and biographical information of John A. McCormick

Gene Collora
for prints and extensive use of his photo archives

.
.

Roger & Leah McEnery
for the gracious use of the Goodwin Gallagher glass
plate negative and all assistance in researching the location

Bob Cornett
for use of his John Arbuckle image
.
.

Conrad Milster
for the gracious use of his tugboat image collection
(JST, HT, EL, BT, BEDT)

.

Tim Darnell
for entrusting his NY area slide collection to my presence
so as to rescan all his images of BEDT, NYD, etc

David Pearce
contributing material on Lehigh Valley and
Bronx offline terminal locations
.

Dave's Rail Pix / Dave's Electric Railroads
for use of the American Dock Co.,
South Brooklyn and Bush Terminal Trolley images.

.

Dave Pirmann
for use of his South Brooklyn Railway photos
please visit his outstanding website on NYC Subways
.

Joseph De May
for contributing several very old pier station images!

.
.

David Ramos
photos and info on the Erie West 28th Street Freight Station

.

Gino DiCarlo
photo of Southern New York Railway #123
(ex-Procter & Gamble)
.

Jay Reed
furnishing info on several industrial locomotives
(Seatrain, Phelps-Dodge, G&R Packing)

.

Harold Fagerberg
for use of his photographs
.
.

Joseph Roborecky
for his continued assistance in research, proofreading,
contributions in all subjects and his support and friendship
.

Jose Feliciano
friend & fellow railroad historian, BEDT fan, and
for subway car identification

.

Don Ross
for use of his Bush Terminal trolley photos

Nathan Fenno
President of the New York, Susquenhanna & Western Rwy.
for information on NYS&W service to Proctor & Gamble
Port Ivory from 1985-1991
.

Benjamin W. Schaeffer
for extensive cooperation, information, corrections and gifts of
South Brooklyn Railway, G&R Packing, Bay Ridge Branch

Ben Fiorello
for the use of his 1970 G & R Packing images

.

Allen Stanley
for furnishing his indispensable collection of builders records
.

Thomas R. Flagg
for his continuous assistance, use of maps and data,
and answering my ever growing amount of questions!

.

Paul F. Strubeck
stalwart friend & fellow railroad historian for research,
editing, tugboat data, and allowing me to "take over"
his Bush Terminal, New York Dock & Cross Harbor pages.
.

Cynthia Franco
images from the
DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University
.

John Taubeneck
builders information for American Hoist, Bucyrus &
Ohio Locomotive cranes in the New York Area

Jon Franz
for furnishing many documents on DL&W
Wallabout Terminal closure, information on Harlem Transfer,
and photos of CRRNJ Bronx Terminal
.

John Teichmoeller
Rail Marine Information Group Coordinator
join the RMIG here:
RMIG Membership
.

Charles Gerow
retired NY Harbor Pilot (Sandy Hook) for his insight into
NY area harbor operations

.

Joseph Testagrose
for use of his South Brooklyn, Bush Terminal
and New York Dock locomotive photos
.

Gene Gerstner
for his Queens Subway, Apartment & Loft Building,
and Degnon Terminal contributions

..

Frank J. Trezza
history of Seatrain Shipbuilding operations at
the Brooklyn Navy Yard

Steve Grande
for hosting my websites on trainweb.org,
and allowing me all the ftp space I ask for!

.

Arie Van Tol & Gary Smith
of The Port Authority of NY & NJ
for access and escort to former Procter & Gamble
property in Port Ivory, Staten Island

.

Jim Guthrie
for several Port Facilities maps
that added one page (AG&P) and helped others (ALH&P)
(LV W27), (ERR W28) & (PRR W37)!

.

Alton Underwood
construction, engine & ownership information
on CRRNJ #100

Jay Held /
Erie Lackawanna Historical Society;

for information, photos and solving many Erie RR
history dilemmas!
visit at: http://erielackhs.org/
.

Tim Warris
for his contributions on, and use of his
Central RR of NJ Bronx Terminal images

Matt J. Herson
for the furnishing of, and the use of a large assortment
of his images

.

Robert Yanosey
for the use of his photos and reprint permission of photos
from his Morning Sun Books publications

Evan Jennings & the Trolley Museum of NY
for ownership info on IND / NYCTA Drill Motor #41
and identifying the ex-TMNY interurban car being hauled by
the South Brooklyn Rwy.
.
visit at:
www.TMNY.org
..

Lillian Zahn
for allowing me to procure Frank Zahn's NY
Industrial / Terminal Railroad photo archives

.

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Interested in Rail - Marine / Offline Terminal Operations?

.

   Then consider joining the Rail Marine Information Group!

.

Rail Marine Information Group Website

.

.

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For those of you who wish to visit my other railroad websites, please click here:

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Website Dedication

This website is fondly dedicated to the memory of my father Stan.
Quite simply, he is solely responsible for my interest in railroading, and for that I shall forever be indebted.

See you at the next stop dad.

 ~ STANLEY GOLDSTEIN ~

December Twenty-fifth Nineteen Hundred and Forty-two


October Fifth Two Thousand and Nine


In the cab of BEDT #16 while stored on 7A9 track (next to the airshaft) - 1981

   It is with great honor that I also dedicate portions of this website to the memory of Francis "Frank" George Zahn. I never had the pleasure of actually meeting Frank, but I knew of him and his extensive railroad archives. The railfan community suffered a significant loss with his passing.

   His wife Lillian was gracious enough to allow me access to Frank's archives and to procure his vast collection of New York Industrial & Terminal Railroad photos (Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, New York Dock, Bush Terminal, American Dock and Atlas Terminal), so that he and his photographs may be remembered and kept in the public eye. This was my first collection purchase and I am proud that it was formerly Frank's.

   So in recognition for her graciousness, I found it necessary to see to it that we all remember Frank for his selfless contributions to the railfan community. Henceforth, those pages of which his images are on (Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, Bush Terminal, New York Dock and Atlas Terminal) are now dedicated in his memory...

Francis "Frank" George Zahn

February Twenty-Third, Nineteen Hundred Twenty Five


June Eighth, Two Thousand Eight

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About the author:

Please click here to learn about the
AUTHOR
.

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